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Old 04-26-2006, 10:03 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
This is a definite 'throw it out' situation.

It's easy to say,"Throw it out to be on the safe side.", and that bothers me because you waste a lot of good food that way.

This does NOT fall into that category. Toss it!
That is so true and what makes it so hard... I HATE waste, and strive to make anything stretch. But at the cost to your health, well..... not sure that it is worth it!
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Old 04-27-2006, 10:04 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sattie
It was covered, and for some reason I like playing with fire. I was a pyromaniac as a kid! I appreciate the responses and I think the consensus is to ditch the "ye ol chicken stock". As much as I hate to, I can't help but hear the "better safe than sorry" credo in my head as I lay miserably in my bed because I just had to save the stock!!!

I still can't resist entertaining the question that if you boil something, would that not in fact kill anything living on the boil-ee? Just so there are no misconceptions, I am not keeping the stock!
Like GB said, you can't kill all the bacteria by boiling. Also, some bacteria produce toxic substances, so while you might kill them by boiling, their toxic by-products are still present in the food, and that can make you sick. Be safe, chuck it!

I always chill my stock by placing a cake rack in a plugged sink, pour ice cubes around the pan, fill the sink (not the pan!) with water, then place a two-liter soda bottle, label removed and cleaned, filled with water and frozen, straight into the stock. I can chill two gallons of boiling stock (212 degrees) to 40 degrees in about 30 minutes.
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Old 04-27-2006, 10:26 AM   #13
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Thanks Allen, I appreciate the suggestion on cooling the stock. I normally just let it cool for about 20 minutes and then place it in the frig. I let it set for a day so that the fat comes to the top and I can scrape it off. Then I pour it into baggies and freeze. Is that process ok or do I need to take steps to cool my stock quicker?
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Old 04-27-2006, 10:32 AM   #14
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It depends on how much stock you made, how cool it got in those 20 minutes, and what else is in your fridge.

Basically the reason you cool it before putting it in the fridge is so the heat from the stock does not raise the temp inside the fridge thus bringing everything into the danger zone (40-140 degrees F). If your stock is going to raise the temp of the fridge to that range then it needs to be cooled more before you stick it in there.

Now if you only have things like ketchup, lettuce, soda, and things that would be OK in the danger zone then it really doesn't matter much.
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Old 04-27-2006, 10:40 AM   #15
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Allen's method is a really good one for quick cooling. Keep the ice water moving in the sink, swirl it around with your hands or a utensil. That will draw the heat from the pot a lot faster than just letting it sit.

The frozen water bottle part is also good as it draws heat from the middle of the pot while the ice water in the sink handles the outside. Several smaller bottles (one liter size) will work even better as the present a larger surface area to the hot stock.

After a few minutes of this treatment, the stock will be cold enough to pop into the fridge.
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Old 04-27-2006, 10:41 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
It depends on how much stock you made, how cool it got in those 20 minutes, and what else is in your fridge.

Basically the reason you cool it before putting it in the fridge is so the heat from the stock does not raise the temp inside the fridge thus bringing everything into the danger zone (40-140 degrees F). If your stock is going to raise the temp of the fridge to that range then it needs to be cooled more before you stick it in there.

Now if you only have things like ketchup, lettuce, soda, and things that would be OK in the danger zone then it really doesn't matter much.
I have a second frig with nothing but spirits and soda in it... I don't think it will hurt that stuff much.
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Old 04-27-2006, 10:43 AM   #17
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I have a second frig with nothing but spirits and soda in it... I don't think it will hurt that stuff much.
Nope that should be fine. The only thing I might be concerned about is the motor. If it needs to run extra hard to cool down the contents then it could burn out prematurely. I would guess in most cases that would not happen though.
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Old 04-27-2006, 11:40 AM   #18
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Dang if you don't eat the stock, how will we really know????? (just jokin' wif ya)
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Old 04-27-2006, 11:55 AM   #19
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(This is for next time)
I've been using this stuff for a while. Makes the best broth
& takes no time to make a homemade tasting broth.
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Old 04-27-2006, 12:06 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by jkath

(This is for next time)
I've been using this stuff for a while. Makes the best broth
& takes no time to make a homemade tasting broth.

I've used the veggie broth from this brand and find it very tasty.
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