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Old 04-27-2006, 03:38 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
You have been lucky...
Neah, I disagree. Nothing to do with luck. I often leave soup on the stove to cool down. There is really no problem with that. As the matter of fact soup tastes better if left to cool down slowly rather than in refrigerator. I would not leave cold soup just to seat on the table for a day, but cooling down is fine.
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Old 04-27-2006, 03:45 PM   #32
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I do it like Allen put pot in sink with cold water and ice.I do it for spaghetti sauce,soups,stews you name it.It chills it fast so you can go ahead and refridgerate in about 20 minutes or so.
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Old 04-27-2006, 03:47 PM   #33
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Anytime your chicken soup stays in the 40-140 degree range for a prolonged amount of time you really are just playing with fire. If a restaurant did that the board of health would not be very happy. There is a reason that is called the danger zone.
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Old 04-27-2006, 03:52 PM   #34
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"spaghetti" or tomato sauce really falls into another category even if it contains meat, because of the acidity of the tomatoes. i often make a pot o' gravy (tomato) and leave it on the stove overnight to cool before divvying it up into containers for the fridge and freezer. sometimes, the bigger pots are still pretty warm to the touch 12 or more hours later.

i wouldn't mess with chicken stock tho. it's something easily and inexpensively replaced, but the risks of getting sick are far greater than it's worth.
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Old 04-27-2006, 04:05 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
You have been lucky.
When it comes to things like chicken, always buckle up

So true. Leaving it out overnight is a real no-no. When something is warm to the touch, that's when the bacteria are multiplying the fastest.

Food poisoning isn't pleasant.
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Old 04-27-2006, 04:22 PM   #36
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Here is some info on proper food handling.

Here is a quote from this page.
Quote:
5. Temperature
Bacteria grows rapidly between the temperatures of 40 degrees F and 140 degrees F. This temperature range is known as the "Danger Zone". To properly store, hold, and cook foods, it is imperative to minimize the amount of time foods are at these temperatures. Pathogenic bacteria thrive in the Danger Zone; certain strains can double in number every 20 minutes. These are the bacteria that cause foodborne illnesses, but do not affect taste, smell, or appearance of the food.

* Any foods that have been in this temperature range for two hours or more should be discarded; they might taste all right, but can make you very sick.
* Don't marinate food at room temperature for longer than 1 hour.
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Old 04-27-2006, 04:44 PM   #37
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GB, the thing about all this food handling is that they do not point out factor that it is true when temperature is from 40 to 140, but not other way around. When food cools down from 220 + it is not the same when you simply leave pot of soup on the table all day. That is why i said that overnight wouldn't be a problem, but the whole day - I wouldn't risk it.
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Old 04-27-2006, 04:49 PM   #38
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Charlie,

Are you suggesting it's ok to simmer chicken stock at 212 degrees and then just turn off the heat & leave it on the stove overnight?

Because that's definitely not ok.

The stock will drop in temp 'till it is under 140 and if it's not refrigerated, it will stay in the danger zone for way too long. Unless your house is unheated and it's winter time.

If that's not what you are saying, can you clarify?
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Old 04-27-2006, 06:00 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
You have been lucky. In most cases yes you can do this and you will be fine, but it is like playing Russian Roulette (sp?). That one time that you do get sick from doing this will be the last time you would ever think of trying it.

You could drive for years without a seatbelt and be fine, but that one time you get hit by the mack truck you will be wishing you took the small precaution of buckling up.

When it comes to things like chicken, always buckle up
I will say this, I was making a strawberry cake and was eating the left over batter... within 4 hours I was in the hospital. The docs say it had nothing to do with the batter, but that batter had raw eggs in it. If it did or not, I never touch/eat cake batter anymore or anything with raw eggs. 3 days in the hospital was enough for me. What ever I had was eating the lining of my tummy and moving very very fast.
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Old 04-27-2006, 09:14 PM   #40
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oh, my, throw it out. i'm certified in kitchen sanitation so hear me on this if you may.
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