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Old 04-29-2006, 07:28 PM   #51
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i'm relieved you didn't consume it. i had a course for around 40 days on food safety, & got nationally certified after that with a lengthyexam.
so many foodborne illnesses!
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Old 05-07-2006, 06:37 AM   #52
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In the winter, my kitchen gets as cold overnight as my fridge, so I wouldn't hesitate to use it. In the summer, forget it, trash. What I always do when in doubt, throw it out. When it is a little iffy (in other words, I'd have died at age 2 if mom obeyed all the "laws" about food safety, and I'd never have been conceived if my grandmothers did) I take a bite of the food in question early in the day. I've never gotten sick, and none of my freinds (who eat at my house often) have, either.
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Old 05-07-2006, 08:28 PM   #53
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"I have no idea how thick a copper layer has to be to be effective in cookware. I do know I have no interest in polishing copper."

Restaurant copper is 2.5mm to 3mm thick and is heavy..if bonded with SS it is called bimetal (very thin ss inner lining) if not it is tinned and a good thick tinning looks uneven (done by hand) or if plain it is only useful for candy making or polenta.

copper is a heavy metal, and some of the stuff sold is quite lightweight...that's a giveaway that something is amiss. Copper for cooking should not be laquered.

Brands to look for are Mauviel, Bourgeat, Falk Culinair, (French and Belgium) Delerhin (also French), Hammersmith (American) Lara (Australian) Most Italian brands are a little thinner but still well made. (Pupuenni and Ruffoni)

Copper cladding by Allclad or Calphalon is a nice look, but their pans are aluminum more or less. (still good pans for sure)

Polishing...easy to do with today's cleaners only needed as you wash the pot. Not a big deal.

As for looks copper could be black and I wouldn't care ...it's the cooking properties that I like.
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Old 05-08-2006, 08:40 AM   #54
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I think too, that you should trash it rather than chance it. For me such a faux pas depends on the time of year and where I live -- here in NW IL, in the winter, I'd keep it (I swear my kitchen is colder than my fridge sometimes). In Florida or here in the summer, down the drain.
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Old 05-08-2006, 10:22 AM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robo410
...Restaurant copper is 2.5mm to 3mm thick and is heavy..if bonded with SS it is called bimetal (very thin ss inner lining) if not it is tinned and a good thick tinning looks uneven (done by hand) or if plain it is only useful for candy making or polenta.

copper is a heavy metal, and some of the stuff sold is quite lightweight...that's a giveaway that something is amiss. Copper for cooking should not be laquered.

Brands to look for are Mauviel, Bourgeat, Falk Culinair, (French and Belgium) Delerhin (also French), Hammersmith (American) Lara (Australian) Most Italian brands are a little thinner but still well made. (Pupuenni and Ruffoni)....
Thanks Robo. Good info!
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