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Old 12-30-2010, 08:59 AM   #31
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I definitely do not follow every government guideline. I eat raw fish, raw eggs, "undercooked" meats, and allow lean meats to reach 50-60F on the counter before searing/roasting. I also allow stocks to cool 3-4 hours before packaging/freezing, and often leave cooked meat out for that same time frame before moving them to the refrigerator.

That said, if I cooked a pork loin to 145F (my preferred doneness) and left it out overnight, I would toss it while muttering profane comments about my state of affairs.
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Old 12-30-2010, 11:23 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by mozart View Post
There is a limited number pathogenic bacteria that even produce toxins. Most are in the Clostridium genus and need anaerobic conditions to form and most are not heat resistant. For example botulism toxin is not generally heat resistant.

The only common bacteria that I am aware of that produces a heat resistant toxin would be Staph. It is not uncommon to be on the skin, hair and nose of healthy people. It is not considered deadly and clearly not as deadly as the common flu. In order for that to be present, someone handling the roast would have to be a carrier of the organism, and pass it on to the food.

Heat doesn't kill toxins because they aren't alive in the first place. It destabilizes them.

Most of the concern and regulation about food borne illness is based on commercial food service conditions; many people handling the food, many different bacteria being brought into the establishment and less interest on the part of the workers to be safe then one has in their home.

So home cooked foods are inherently safer that commercially prepared foods just because there is far less opportunity for contamination.

So the best we can say is reheating the roast to 165 degrees might make it "safe". There is no way to know for sure, and that is why some will choose to eat and some will choose to throw.

Bacterial Food Intoxications, Bacterial Toxin, Metabolities, Tuberclosis, Typhoid Fever, Cholera, Salmonella, Bacillus

Bacillus is another food-related bacteria that throws of heat resistant toxins.

I got sick from it once and it was ghastly.
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Old 12-30-2010, 03:13 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by GB View Post
As oldandcrotchety said, you are never too old to learn something new. Thanks mozart. You are someone whose word on this stuff I trust immensely. So based on what you have seen here mozart, would you have eaten the pork in question?
No. Nine hours is way too long for me. Food spoilage bacteria could certainly grow in that time, and while reheating would potentially make it safer, I would have to believe the quality would suffer a lot.
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Old 12-30-2010, 04:14 PM   #34
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Bacillus is another food-related bacteria that throws of heat resistant toxins.

I got sick from it once and it was ghastly.
Bacillus cereus does, but it is not very common. In this case, a roast might be contaminated on the outside before it is cooked with spores, but the cooking process would likely kill them all since the outside of the roast would reach 325-400 depending on the cooking process. Contamination after cooking would be less likely as it is not something the OP would likely be carrying around. But it is possible, and if you are the one who gets it, you really don't want to hear how rare it is. Thanks for pointing that out.
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