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Old 09-10-2015, 12:05 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FoodieFanatic View Post
Did you know that you don't have to add any liquid when you use the slow cooker? The fat and water content (especially if the meat is placed in the slow cooker frozen) will make enough liquid. Slow cooking without liquid is the only way I use it for meat. It comes out really flavorful and tender.

But if you really feel the need to add liquid, no more than half a cup to cover the bottom. You will be surprised when it is done, lots of liquid.

Of course, this doesn't apply when making soup.
I agree and would not add any liquid to the slow cooker. I also would never put frozen raw chicken in there to start with.
I am also a believer in browning meats before putting them into a slow cooker.
If I were to add anything, it would be stock, beer or wine in most cases.

Quote:
Originally Posted by iamcliff View Post
My mom and grandma (and me) always thawed chicken out by leaving it on the counter for several hours. Years later, I read something similar where this can be bad and cause bacteria, so I got nervous and stopped doing it for some time. Didn't take long before I was back to doing the same thing and I still do the same thing even today. None of us has ever gotten sick that I know of.
Is the bacteria thing an old wives' tale, or is there some truth to it?
I still thaw chicken (and other meats) on the counter. I even give it a head start by using the defrost function in the microwave.
I do not allow it to sit out until its fully thawed. When its close, into the fridge it goes.
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Old 09-10-2015, 12:13 PM   #12
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Thawing poultry is always a bit of a guessing game for me. For instance, they say to thaw a turkey for 3 days in the refrigerator, yet when I try that, it's still hard as a rock after 3 days. I have never found any choice but to alternate countertop and fridge to get it thawed in 3 days.

A whole chicken is a little bit easier, but it still takes at least a couple of days in the fridge, while a head start on the counter for 3 or 4 hours then back in the fridge gets the job done in one day. Even then, when I extract the giblets from the cavity, they are still half frozen with ice and frost clinging to them.

Chicken parts I will usually put in a ziplock bag and then into lukewarm water. The water turns cold quickly but at least cuts through the frost.

Like Iamcliff above, nobody has ever gotten sick from any poultry I've cooked, so it can't be all that wrong.
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Old 09-10-2015, 12:22 PM   #13
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A lot of people put frozen meat in a slow cooker on a regular basis, but a number of sources recommend that you don't because it takes too long to reach 140 F to kill bacteria. Here's some info from WebMD and the University of Minnesota:

Slow Cooker Food-Safety Guide

Slow Cookers and Food Safety : Preparing Safe Meals : Preserving and Preparing : Safe Meals : Preserving and Preparing : Food Safety : Food : University of Minnesota Extension
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Old 09-10-2015, 12:28 PM   #14
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I can't imagine putting frozen meat or poultry in the slow cooker. People often forget that even though heat over 140 kills bacteria, it doesn't destroy the toxins that bacteria create as a side effect of reproduction.

Just because you haven't died doesn't mean you haven't had food poisoning. There's no such thing as the 24-hour flu. Symptoms often don't develop for a few days after exposure and then people don't connect the symptoms to something they ate.

I thaw frozen chicken parts in the microwave and whole chicken in the fridge. I have a fairly new microwave that does a good job of thawing.
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Old 09-10-2015, 12:39 PM   #15
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I really try to remember to take something out of the freezer the night before. It goes on a plate at the bottom of the fridge. Then when I get up it comes out with the plate and sits on the counter until thawed. Back into the fridge until I am ready to cook it.
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Old 09-10-2015, 12:51 PM   #16
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I've never started cooking with frozen meats of any kind. For one thing, it makes it difficult to cook it evenly - much harder to control the doneness.
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Old 09-10-2015, 12:54 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
I've never started cooking with frozen meats of any kind. For one thing, it makes it difficult to cook it evenly - much harder to control the doneness.
+1..
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Old 09-10-2015, 01:13 PM   #18
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While we are on the topic, it is also recommended that you remove any leftovers from the crock and put them in another shallow dish before your put them in the refrigerator. The warm crock takes too long to cool down, keeping food in the danger zone (40 F to 140 F).
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Old 09-10-2015, 11:37 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
While we are on the topic, it is also recommended that you remove any leftovers from the crock and put them in another shallow dish before your put them in the refrigerator. The warm crock takes too long to cool down, keeping food in the danger zone (40 F to 140 F).


Good point.

Also crock pots destroy chicken breasts by overcooking them to death...
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Old 09-11-2015, 11:53 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I can't imagine putting frozen meat or poultry in the slow cooker. People often forget that even though heat over 140 kills bacteria, it doesn't destroy the toxins that bacteria create as a side effect of reproduction.

Just because you haven't died doesn't mean you haven't had food poisoning. There's no such thing as the 24-hour flu. Symptoms often don't develop for a few days after exposure and then people don't connect the symptoms to something they ate.

I thaw frozen chicken parts in the microwave and whole chicken in the fridge. I have a fairly new microwave that does a good job of thawing.
Good point on the "24 hour flu".
Seems theres always someone with this dreaded disease each season.
Just the use of the word flu when no blood test were taken and blood tested is just wrong.
I hear so many exclaim they have or had the flu, yet when i ask how the testing went and how the reporting to the CDC went, they have no idea as to what I mean.
Real flu is very serious and can only be diagnosed with a blood test. A positive flu test is then reported to the CDC isn't it?
I am asking.

BTW, I have had whats called the "blue can flu". This infirmity is achieved by ingestion of many alcoholic drinks when you damn well know to stop!
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