"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Food and Kitchen Safety
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-02-2008, 11:41 AM   #21
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 298
It's not just about botulism. There's plenty of other bacteria that will make you sick.
__________________

__________________
thymeless is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2008, 12:48 PM   #22
Senior Cook
 
mozart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 419
Quote:
Originally Posted by thymeless View Post
It's not just about botulism. There's plenty of other bacteria that will make you sick.
Not if they aren't alive. Bacteria can't live in an oven at 350-400 degrees. The only pathogenic spore I know of that can survive that type of environment is the one that causes botulism and that needs an anaerobic condition to germinate.

The two hour rule that may apply to cooked, leftover foods is based on the premise that when the food is removed from the oven(stove, Grill), and you serve it, you are potentially contaminating it from the serving utensils, your skin as you reach over it, cross-contamination, and other factors in the environment like fans, air conditioners, open windows, or you or other people in the room stirring up dust or coughing.

None of those factors apply to an untouched potato in a hot oven. Pathogenic bacteria don't just appear on food, they have to be introduced.
__________________

__________________
mozart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2008, 01:12 PM   #23
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 298
Remember those fork holes you poked in the potato? They penetrate the dirty skin first and transfer it all to the insides of the potato.
__________________
thymeless is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2008, 01:21 PM   #24
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Quote:
Originally Posted by thymeless View Post
Remember those fork holes you poked in the potato? They penetrate the dirty skin first and transfer it all to the insides of the potato.
That kind of thinking will get you no potato at all!

By Mozart's reasoning, the potato will have become hot enough to kill any germs in or around it as it cooks.

Also by Mozart's reasoning, you would not be able to open the oven door to collect the potatoes you plan on eating without fear of allowing contaminants into the oven. Unless you leave it turned on to kill all the new nasties you just introduced.

Maybe the OP should start eating rice for their starch
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2008, 01:22 PM   #25
Senior Cook
 
mozart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 419
Quote:
Originally Posted by thymeless View Post
Remember those fork holes you poked in the potato? They penetrate the dirty skin first and transfer it all to the insides of the potato.
Likely you are correct. Now find me a reference to a pathogenic bacteria, other than botulism spores, that can survive the internal temperature that a potato reaches while baking; at least 212 degrees but likely higher.
__________________
mozart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2008, 03:43 PM   #26
Senior Cook
 
mozart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 419
Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
That kind of thinking will get you no potato at all!

By Mozart's reasoning, the potato will have become hot enough to kill any germs in or around it as it cooks.

Also by Mozart's reasoning, you would not be able to open the oven door to collect the potatoes you plan on eating without fear of allowing contaminants into the oven. Unless you leave it turned on to kill all the new nasties you just introduced.

Maybe the OP should start eating rice for their starch
My reasoning goes something like this. If you google baked potato, you will see that the perfect baked potato is done at 210 degrees. However, most of us go beyond that point, since we don't use a thermometer. There is no pathogenic bacteria that I am aware of that can survive 210 degrees anyway, except botulism spores.

When I open an oven door to take out the potatoes I'm eating, it is still 375 degree inside, so the new "nasties" are killed immediately even though the oven is turned off.

My reasoning is based on food science. As I've said many times here, most food poisoning occurs from contamination after cooking due to poor handling and storage practices. But is requires the introduction of new bacteria after cooking in a environment that the new bacteria can survive. That is the reason for the 2 hour rule. A 375 degree oven isn't such an environment.
__________________
mozart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2008, 04:36 PM   #27
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Mooresville, NC
Posts: 3,102
Speaking only from personal experience, I've eaten potatoes that have been left out all night on more than one occassion with no ill effects.
__________________
Callisto in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2008, 07:46 AM   #28
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Callisto in NC View Post
Speaking only from personal experience, I've eaten potatoes that have been left out all night on more than one occassion with no ill effects.
Yes, but, everyone that stopped posting on this thread has obviously died from eating left over left out potatoes.
__________________
blissful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2008, 08:49 AM   #29
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Mooresville, NC
Posts: 3,102
Well, I'm still here. Then again, I'm eating the 7 day old spaghetti sauce from the other thread too. I must have some form of cast iron stomach.
__________________
Callisto in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2008, 09:45 AM   #30
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,113
__________________

__________________
blissful is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:52 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.