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Old 10-14-2008, 11:14 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by Callisto in NC View Post
Well, I'm still here. Then again, I'm eating the 7 day old spaghetti sauce from the other thread too. I must have some form of cast iron stomach.
Would that be non-reactive enameled, like Le Crueset, or just well seasoned cast iron?
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Old 10-14-2008, 12:25 PM   #32
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Would that be non-reactive enameled, like Le Crueset, or just well seasoned cast iron?
Just the well seasoned variety.
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Old 10-10-2016, 11:39 AM   #33
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I'd agree with Mozart.
How can a food you leave on the shelf for thirty days become poisionous after being baked at 400 degrees for an hour?
Now as for freshness, I don't know how fresh it will be. Kind of like leaving a slice of pizza at room temperature too long. It will dry up, and that CAN upset your stomach a little. But not make you sick.
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Old 10-10-2016, 01:50 PM   #34
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I'd agree with Mozart.
How can a food you leave on the shelf for thirty days become poisionous after being baked at 400 degrees for an hour?
Now as for freshness, I don't know how fresh it will be. Kind of like leaving a slice of pizza at room temperature too long. It will dry up, and that CAN upset your stomach a little. But not make you sick.
Hi and welcome to Discuss Cooking Funny to see this ancient thread resurrected.

I think Michael's response is the best one: Just avoid the problem by not leaving leftovers in the oven, no matter what they are. Put them on the counter or in a dish and you'll be reminded to put everything away when cleaning up the kitchen.

Btw, dryness in food does not give people an upset stomach. Mild food poisoning does that.

And raw and cooked foods are chemically different. Raw potatoes obviously have pathogens in them, since they do eventually develop soft spots and decompose. Cooking potatoes releases moisture from within them, which, as they cool, creates a hospitable environment for any pathogens present to reproduce to harmful levels. Best to just avoid the problem
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Old 10-15-2016, 05:21 PM   #35
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Hi and welcome to Discuss Cooking Funny to see this ancient thread resurrected.

I think Michael's response is the best one: Just avoid the problem by not leaving leftovers in the oven, no matter what they are. Put them on the counter or in a dish and you'll be reminded to put everything away when cleaning up the kitchen.

Btw, dryness in food does not give people an upset stomach. Mild food poisoning does that.

And raw and cooked foods are chemically different. Raw potatoes obviously have pathogens in them, since they do eventually develop soft spots and decompose. Cooking potatoes releases moisture from within them, which, as they cool, creates a hospitable environment for any pathogens present to reproduce to harmful levels. Best to just avoid the problem
Sorry, GG, but what you are saying is not correct. First, you are confusing pathogens with bacteria. The bacteria that eventually spoils a potato is not a pathogenic bacteria. Second, potatoes have to reach a temperature of 212 degrees to cook and become soft. 212 degrees will kill any bacteria on or in the potato. In addition, we prick potatoes to let the moisture out, so there is far less moisture after cooking than before. However, as soon as the potato reaches a temperature that will support spoilage bacteria, it can begin to spoil. My memory of this case was the potatoes were left, untouched in the oven. In that case, it would take a long time for spoilage bacteria to get in the oven and act. But I would not eat 12 hours potatoes, because life is too short to eat dried out stale food.
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Old 10-15-2016, 05:27 PM   #36
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Well, there are toxins from pathogens that are not inactivated by high heat, so I wouldn't risk it.
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Old 10-16-2016, 07:08 AM   #37
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Well, there are toxins from pathogens that are not inactivated by high heat, so I wouldn't risk it.
Toxins are produced by live bacteria. So if there are toxins on the potato, they would have to be there when it was first put in the hot oven. And if that is the case, then the potato will have the toxin as soon as it is baked and 12 hours later. You get sick either way.
That, and I've never heard of toxins on potatoes, except for botulism after the potato was put in anaerobic conditions.
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Old 10-16-2016, 08:23 AM   #38
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Staph. http://scienceblogs.com/effectmeasur...-poisoning-an/
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Old 10-16-2016, 08:34 AM   #39
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Not even in the ballpark. Staph toxin is associated with potato salad, because of the mayo.

If staph bacteria could live on potato skin, the toxin would be there when you put the potato in the oven, then the bacteria would die, and then the toxin would still be there an hour or 12 hours later. the same amount of toxin. So what you seem to recommend is that folks not eat baked potatoes at all.
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Old 10-16-2016, 09:01 AM   #40
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For clarity, the problem with potato salad is that the potato raises the PH of the mayo to the point that the mayo can support growth of staph and thus produce the toxin. This only happens when the salad is left out for long periods AND staph has been introduced during preparation after the potatoes have been cooked. This process is nothing like baking a potato and leaving it in the oven.
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