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Old 02-16-2008, 01:51 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
but, but... mayo = more moist surface area, as well as fats and proteins.

awww, nevermind.
Y'know, I really don't just make this stuff up. I work at a medical school, I'm married to a former scientist teacher who once taught experimental design, and I'm dealing with two chronic illnesses, one of which sometimes requires me to take drugs that depress my immune system. So I'm a big believer in evidence-based medicine, which is actually the name of a class taught by a friend of mine to medical and physician assistant students. I look for evidence to back up claim X, and if I find it from several credible sources, I tend to believe it.

re: mayo and spoilage:
Fun anecdote: My uncle and his wife sailed around the world with no refrigeration; it took seven years. They had various kinds of sandwiches with mayo all the time with no ill effects. She also made huge pots of soup and left them on the stove all day. Then she would boil them for five minutes before serving up some more, again with no ill effects. Yes, I know this isn't a legitimate study, but it's interesting nonetheless.
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Old 02-16-2008, 01:58 PM   #12
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oops, forgive me. (i'm being sarcastic about the subject, not your life or experience ),

i didn't know that eating mold was better than eating bacteria.

ok, i will give you that this one, from what you just posted (i have to do more research on the pH of the acid in mayo) this seems to be somewhat of a myth, but bad practices will still lead you to problems. calling one thing or another a busted myth is really just advertising ignorance in another direction.

it's still not safe to eat mayo that been warm too long.
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Old 02-16-2008, 02:18 PM   #13
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There's such a thing as pasteurized and unpasteurized eggs?
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Old 02-16-2008, 02:19 PM   #14
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I know there is still such a thing as unpasteurized milk.. guy at the farmers market brings it mostly for a Muslim couple that requests it.
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Old 02-16-2008, 07:29 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Well, we have the same ultimate goal, but I do believe that it's accurate to say that a myth exists that plastic boards are safer than wooden ones. I hear TV chefs say it all the time, which irritates me a lot

The same goes for the idea that mayo causes foods to spoil more quickly, when the opposite is true. What people generally don't understand is that it *used to be* true, back when people made their own homemade mayo from unpasteurized eggs. But now most people use commercial mayo, which is made from pasteurized eggs and often contains vinegar and lemon juice - acids that inhibit the growth of bacteria.

So I'm on a mission to spread the word about these myths
GG,

What you are saying is true. On a previous thread here about flavored mayo and butters I said:

"I still don't know if the OPs question dealt with fresh made or commercial Mayo. It would be nice if someone takes the time to post a question is she/he would follow up.

There is a ton of mis-information about mayo. Commercial Mayo is a relatively safe product, doesn't not "cause" food poisoning, and will not support significant bacterial growth even if left at room temperature.

The reason is that is has a ph of about 3, and anything below 4.5 is generally considered safe at room temp. Commercial mayo is mainly oil, pasteurized egg products, and vinegar or lemon juice. The refrigerator shelf life is mainly a quality issue, not a safety issue when it is left in its original state.

The two month throw out recommendation is when the quality will begin to be compromised.

Of course, it could just be a big conspiracy by Hellman's and Kraft to sell more mayo"

Many restaurants that serve sandwiches during the lunch rush leave the mayo out in a container and are not given a violation by the health department upon inspection.

I too am interested in dispelling the myths, because they are dangerous in that they often take our focus away from what is important.

As to the safety zone temps, these change with jurisdictions. 45 degrees was a common standard for many years. 40 is now the federal guideline. Both have some "fudge factor" built in.

Did it ever seem odd to anyone that all these guidelines hit exactly on a 5 degree mark like 40, 45, 180 etc. Do you really think nature is ordered that way, in perfect 5 degree increments.

There is no perfect number, because different micro-organisms grow better at different temp and in different foods.

Having said that, I do think 40 is the "best" guideline, because it is easily obtainable and allows for a little "play" in the thermometer and different areas of the refrigerator.
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Old 02-16-2008, 08:05 PM   #16
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i didn't know that eating mold was better than eating bacteria.
Hmm... which is better for you, yogurt or cheese?
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Old 02-16-2008, 08:51 PM   #17
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we're not talking about beneficial molds, mav.

hey, i never thought to ask our more scientific members like mozart.

wolfie, what dangers exist with mold growth on room temp mayo? are they relatively harmless, unless you have an allergy to such?
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Old 02-16-2008, 09:43 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
we're not talking about beneficial molds, mav.

hey, i never thought to ask our more scientific members like mozart.

wolfie, what dangers exist with mold growth on room temp mayo? are they relatively harmless, unless you have an allergy to such?
Mold is not likely to grow in room temp mayo that is used within a reasonable time.

First, mold shouldn't be in the processed mayo. The spores would be introduced after the mayo is placed out, usually in a different container. This process takes time for growth, even at room temperature.

If you have ever left a cup of coffee on your desk over a holiday weekend you will have an idea of this process.

Mayo will begin to lose quality after a few hours at room temp and you can see the edges becoming opaque.

Anytime you see any mold on food, except hard cheese or salami it is best to just throw it out.

It is natures way of saying you did something wrong.
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Old 02-16-2008, 09:46 PM   #19
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There's such a thing as pasteurized and unpasteurized eggs?
All fresh eggs are unpasteurized. Egg products used in commercially processed foods are pasteurized.
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Old 02-16-2008, 10:31 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by mozart View Post
All fresh eggs are unpasteurized. Egg products used in commercially processed foods are pasteurized.

Pasteurized in-the-shell eggs are available in supermarkets.
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