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Old 05-26-2011, 08:22 AM   #1
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How do you clean your veggies?

Usually with cabbage, iceberg, romaine, you just need to peel off the outer leaf, and the rest will be pretty clean.

But for the veggies that sprout individual stocks/leaves/etc like spinach, kale, and collards, cleaning it isn't as easy as dunking 'em in water...

I blend kale and collard greens for my green smoothies, so I have to shop for them every couple days, and it's not easy.

They're very dirty. On rare occasions, I'll actually find pretty clean kale/collards, and I'll stock up with everything they have, but for the most part, there's a lot of grime, residue, slime, and sometimes even bird feces.

Also, the collard greens often have yellow grime that is literally embedded onto the leaves. The only way to get 'em off is to manually stretch 'em off with your nails. But they're everywhere...

Does anybody deal with these greens?

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Old 05-26-2011, 11:52 AM   #2
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The only kale I deal with is from my garden, so it isn't dirty, it isn't covered in birds' feces (yuck)--if anything, it ends up with some grass on it from the mulch. Because kale (and collards) grow "upright" I'm surprised they are dirty...I'd probably look for another source...or, plant your own. Kale is relatively easy to grow and doesn't take a lot of space. It is frost tolerant and it is also heat tolerant, at least here in southern Ontario. And, we have HIGH humidity and HOT days during July and August.
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Old 05-26-2011, 05:26 PM   #3
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Tampico vegetable brush or soft tooth brush and / or soak and rinse? Because we're concerned about clogging our drainage we use several large (3 or 4 gallon) tubs to soak and rinse and dump the rinse water in our garden or on our mulch pile.
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Old 05-26-2011, 05:35 PM   #4
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A rinse under the tap usually suffices for most vegetables. A bit of "clean" dirt never harmed anybody - it probably helps build a decent immune system.

What I'd be more worried about would be chemical residues left by intensive farming. I always peel carrots for this reason unless I know who grew them and with what - it's also a good idea the give citrus fruits a good scub with detergent as the supermarket stuff has mostly been coated with wax to make them look shiny, appetising and, well, healthy.
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Old 05-26-2011, 07:10 PM   #5
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I typically buy the packages of baby spinach for my green smoothies. Haven't had the opportunity - or rather, the guts - to try kale yet so I can't comment on washing them

The majority of the time I scrub any fruits or veggies when they come in the house. Fruit fly eggs can be brought into the house via bananas, apples, citrus, etc. and I hate having them flying around.
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Old 05-26-2011, 07:12 PM   #6
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Soak in cold water and agitate with my hands in a salad spinner. A few times
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Old 05-27-2011, 06:58 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
The only kale I deal with is from my garden, so it isn't dirty, it isn't covered in birds' feces (yuck)--if anything, it ends up with some grass on it from the mulch. Because kale (and collards) grow "upright" I'm surprised they are dirty...I'd probably look for another source...or, plant your own. Kale is relatively easy to grow and doesn't take a lot of space. It is frost tolerant and it is also heat tolerant, at least here in southern Ontario. And, we have HIGH humidity and HOT days during July and August.
Where did you buy it?

I actually bought some kale seeds from Gurneys, but they came with some chemical coating. I'm gonna return it, because I was expecting organic seeds... I don't know what the point of growing your own fruits and veggies is, if it's not organic...
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Old 05-27-2011, 07:00 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blackpig View Post
A rinse under the tap usually suffices for most vegetables. A bit of "clean" dirt never harmed anybody - it probably helps build a decent immune system.

What I'd be more worried about would be chemical residues left by intensive farming. I always peel carrots for this reason unless I know who grew them and with what - it's also a good idea the give citrus fruits a good scub with detergent as the supermarket stuff has mostly been coated with wax to make them look shiny, appetising and, well, healthy.
Yeah, I always go for the organic kale or collards, but most times, the organic versions are extremely filthy. I don't know why this is...

So I'll go for the non-organic stuff on most occasions.
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Old 05-27-2011, 07:04 AM   #9
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The kale seeds are from plants I grew--no chemical treatment on them.
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Old 05-27-2011, 07:12 AM   #10
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I typically buy the packages of baby spinach for my green smoothies. Haven't had the opportunity - or rather, the guts - to try kale yet so I can't comment on washing them

The majority of the time I scrub any fruits or veggies when they come in the house. Fruit fly eggs can be brought into the house via bananas, apples, citrus, etc. and I hate having them flying around.
The packaged spinaches are extremely convenient. They're usually triple-washed, so I just throw them in a pale of water to give it a final rinse.

But honestly, I only settle for spinach if the kale and collards are in dreadful condition. But kale isn't really in demand, so they don't come conveniently packaged like spinach.

Collards on the other hand come packaged, but 90% of the times, they're still dirty. All you have to do is see through the transparent bag, and you can see the dirt on the stocks...

I'm not sure what your tolerance for green smoothies are, yet, but just throw in a couple stocks of kale (like five or six). Depends on how big each stock is, but generally, I'll use the entire bunch. If it's a big bunch, I might use 2/3 and save the rest for another day. Toss in two large apples, and it's very drinkable.

Of course, smoothies made from spinach is creamy and smooth. Spinach is a very mild veggie. It's not overpowering, and people eat it straight up in salads.

The kale or collard greens smoothies are not as nice in texture. They're more slimy... but they're the king of greens.
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