"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Food and Kitchen Safety
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-15-2007, 08:15 PM   #11
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 3,270
Question one has been dealt with but question two hasn't.

If you are referring to steak, unless the steak is contaminated in some manner, you should be fine with blue or rare steak. Same with most fishes. Talking about poultry - more of an issue. Likewise ground meat.

As to quantity, if the meat is contaminated, you are exposing yourself to a greater risk and therefore, in all likelihood, your chance of getting ill from it will increase. But in certain people, esp those with a weakened immune system like the elderly, young or infirm, the smallest exposure to dodgy food can produce food poisoning.

End of the day, if the food is good, not being thoroughly cooked is not relevant in a lot of situations, but if it is dodgy, you may have an issue.
__________________

__________________
Too many restaurants, not enough time...
Bilby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2007, 08:16 PM   #12
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 3,270
Hope your husband makes steady progress to good health Redkitty. I know how slow the rehabilitation can be.
__________________

__________________
Too many restaurants, not enough time...
Bilby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2007, 08:23 PM   #13
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 49
I got Campylobacter two years ago. I was sick for five days BEFORE I became paralized and had to be hospitized. This was the worst time of my adult life. I was in for 11 days and out of work for at least 7 more.
The bad thing is I remember the chicken wing I ate. I looked at it and said "OH this one is under cooked." Then I dipped it in blue cheese and I ate it.
I will never do that again. I bet I did not eat chicken wings for 2 months after that.
__________________
bigrhino2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2007, 08:27 PM   #14
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 3,270
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigrhino2 View Post
I got Campylobacter two years ago. I was sick for five days BEFORE I became paralized and had to be hospitized. This was the worst time of my adult life. I was in for 11 days and out of work for at least 7 more.
The bad thing is I remember the chicken wing I ate. I looked at it and said "OH this one is under cooked." Then I dipped it in blue cheese and I ate it.
I will never do that again. I bet I did not eat chicken wings for 2 months after that.
I know what you mean!! I vividly remember the burger that gave me kidney failure, although not because it tasted bad but because I usually ask for something to be added or taken away to make sure it gets made up fresh but I didn't on that occasion. First burger I had when I eventually was up to it was from the same store cos what I had was pretty rare and I had been there several times in the past with no problem. (Close to work.)
__________________
Too many restaurants, not enough time...
Bilby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2007, 09:25 PM   #15
The Dude Abides
 
TATTRAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bermuda Native in D.C./NoVA
Posts: 5,324
Send a message via AIM to TATTRAT Send a message via Yahoo to TATTRAT Send a message via Skype™ to TATTRAT
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
There are varying types of food poisoning. Some food poisoning may gave you a mild case of diarrhea and nothing else. You could also get a headache and nothing else. There are many many symptoms ranging from very mild to death.

Red I hope he gets better soon. That is horrible to hear!
Exactly. there are MANY things that can be attributed to food that are simply blown off. fact is, there are very few things that hit you right away. Normally there is a 24-5day grace period before something rears it's ugly head. Not to mention, food borne illnesses are some of the most misdiagnosed things in the medical world.

A lot of people are so quick to blame the restaurant that they were just at, though it could be something they cooked for themselves a few nights ago.
__________________
flickr
TATTRAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2007, 09:39 PM   #16
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Raton,NM, USA
Posts: 4,573
That why health inspectors are so important alot of places either dont keep foods hot enough or cold enough or throw it out soon enough.Then there is sloppy dirty cleaning.There are hundreds of way to let food contaminate if its not handled properly.
__________________
jpmcgrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2007, 10:55 PM   #17
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 350
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilby View Post
End of the day, if the food is good, not being thoroughly cooked is not relevant in a lot of situations, but if it is dodgy, you may have an issue.
What exactly do you mean by this? Do you mean that if the meat is from a reputable source that the risk of food borne illness is pretty small?

My initial reasoning for opening this thread was that I hate it when I am cooking a roast or any type of meat and I am not 100% sure that it is at the proper temperature (like sometimes my thermometer will say 140 or so for pork or 120s for salmon and I am not sure if it's safe). So I just want to know how much I should be concerned for things like that. Along those lines, whenever I eat a piece of meat that I feel is questionable in terms of whether it was as done as it should have been, I wonder how long it is until I am "clear" or if illness could still occur.
__________________
crankin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2007, 11:00 PM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 15,165
Quote:
Originally Posted by crankin View Post
What exactly do you mean by this? Do you mean that if the meat is from a reputable source that the risk of food borne illness is pretty small?

My initial reasoning for opening this thread was that I hate it when I am cooking a roast or any type of meat and I am not 100% sure that it is at the proper temperature (like sometimes my thermometer will say 140 or so for pork or 120s for salmon and I am not sure if it's safe). So I just want to know how much I should be concerned for things like that. Along those lines, whenever I eat a piece of meat that I feel is questionable in terms of whether it was as done as it should have been, I wonder how long it is until I am "clear" or if illness could still occur.
Thanks for clarifying, crankin. When I read your initial post, I was under the impression you were talking about "non home cooked" food, that is restaurant-prepared food.
__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2007, 11:03 PM   #19
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 350
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie E View Post
Thanks for clarifying, crankin. When I read your initial post, I was under the impression you were talking about "non home cooked" food, that is restaurant-prepared food.
Yes, I was referring to home-cooked foods. I am not so worried about restaurant food because I feel like that is one of those things where if it's going to happen, it's going to happen. There isn't much I can do about it (other than send the food back). But at home I am ultimately responsible for the food and so I feel responsible if the food is undercooked.
__________________
crankin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2007, 11:19 PM   #20
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 3,270
Quote:
Originally Posted by crankin View Post
What exactly do you mean by this? Do you mean that if the meat is from a reputable source that the risk of food borne illness is pretty small?

My initial reasoning for opening this thread was that I hate it when I am cooking a roast or any type of meat and I am not 100% sure that it is at the proper temperature (like sometimes my thermometer will say 140 or so for pork or 120s for salmon and I am not sure if it's safe). So I just want to know how much I should be concerned for things like that. Along those lines, whenever I eat a piece of meat that I feel is questionable in terms of whether it was as done as it should have been, I wonder how long it is until I am "clear" or if illness could still occur.
Wasn't getting into reputable sources at all. Just meant that if it isn't contaminated in some way. For the person cooking it, pretty much just food handling and storage techniques. Very few of us actually know how the food is handled up until the time we receive it so you are somewhat limited by sight and smell of the meat/fish. I assume that we all generally only buy food from places we feel are reliable.

Fish and steak (beef, lamb and presumably veal, venison and other meats) can be served rare, cured or even raw. Pork used to need to be cooked thoroughly but over here in Oz, it is now being marketed that it may be cooked to medium-rare, although most still aren't comfortable with the concept. (I don't eat pork though so my knowledge is limited.) Poultry that isn't properly cooked I would be more suspicious of.

I don't use a meat thermometer but look at the juices instead and use a skewer. It isn't how I was taught to cook and I haven't felt the need to use one, although I do have a meat thermometer somewhere...

Also when cooking a roast, keep in mind that the meat continues to cook a little while it rests, esp when talking about seafood. I eat lots of meats/seafood either raw or done as a cerviche or other semi-cured style. And it isn't the most likely way that I will get ill if the ingredients are good. If you are carving a roast and discover a bit that you think is too undercooked, cut around it as you can put it back in the oven to finish cooking without worrying about your diners.

If you are confident of the ingredient before cooking it, then being out a couple of degrees I wouldn't have thought would be an issue but maybe someone who uses a thermometer will be better to clarify that point.

As already mentioned, the time taken to incubate the organism/bacteria enough to show food poisoning symptoms will depend on the organism/bacteria as well as your tolerence. When I got sick, I had next to no tolerance as I was really run down having been super busy at work and super stressed having my position dissolve underneath me!! Different time, I may have been able to resist the bug better.
__________________

__________________
Too many restaurants, not enough time...
Bilby is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:54 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.