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Old 02-20-2008, 11:16 AM   #21
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Part of the reason it's recommended to use the lowest point as well is in the event that the packaging leaks for any reason.
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Old 02-20-2008, 11:25 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Callisto in NC View Post
Why am I the only one who thinks "take it back" rather than toss it.
I agree with taking it back, however that would not work in this case as the OP already cooked it.
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Old 02-20-2008, 11:33 AM   #23
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This seems almost opposite to my fridge. I put all my meat on the top shelf because it's close to the freezer and is the coldest part. Believe me, I've frozen more than my share of cream cheese putting it on that shelf. I've never frozen anything on the bottom shelf.
Your top shelf very possibly is the coldest, but it is not because of its proximity to the freezer. both the fridge and freezer are insulated so one will not affect the other.

As mentioned by CanadianMeg, the reason the bottom shelf is advised is in case of leakage. If it leaks on the top shelf then you run the risk of contaminating everything below it. If it is on the bottom then everything above it is safe.
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Old 02-20-2008, 12:08 PM   #24
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No. Don't eat it.

Cooking kills bacteria but not the spores and toxins the bacteria may have produced. Otherwise you'd not need refrigeration -- you could just cook rank meat.

Also, on a side note, cooking chicken in a slow cooker for 10+ hours is sure to dry it out.
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Old 02-20-2008, 12:35 PM   #25
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I agree with taking it back, however that would not work in this case as the OP already cooked it.
That's true. I would have taken it back the minute it smelled bad. Actually at our Harris Teeter you just have to call and they take your name. They usually don't require you bring it back. I screwed up filet mignon based on the butcher's cooking recommendation and they gave me a full refund and replaced the steaks. They are pretty good customer service wise.
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Old 02-20-2008, 12:39 PM   #26
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I anticipated having my Post #20 disagreed with and thus shortly after making it places 2 thermometers in my fridge (top and bottom).
there is a 0.7c difference, and as I said the Bottom IS colder!
and yes, I Do have the freezer section on the bottom also.

feel free to test this yourself, and we`ll let EVIDENCE do the talking instead :)
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Old 02-20-2008, 12:49 PM   #27
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While I agree that heat rises, I think there are other factors at play too. I have had things freeze in the top back of my fridge while things in the bottom front have not frozen. I do not think that just because heat rises we can always say that the top of the fridge will be warmer than the bottom.
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Old 02-20-2008, 01:03 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by YT2095 View Post
I anticipated having my Post #20 disagreed with and thus shortly after making it places 2 thermometers in my fridge (top and bottom).
there is a 0.7c difference, and as I said the Bottom IS colder!
and yes, I Do have the freezer section on the bottom also.

feel free to test this yourself, and we`ll let EVIDENCE do the talking instead :)
Why would anyone disagree with it? Heat does rise, therefore cold settles, but like I said in my post, I really think the coldest part of your fridge has a lot to do with where it's getting its cold air from.
It is going to be coldest right where that duct/vent is and the temp of the air will slowly increase as it disperses, finally having the colder air settle at the bottom.

Simple principal: You are going to be coldest in an air-conditioned room sitting in a chair by the register, not sitting on the floor 15 ft away
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Old 02-20-2008, 01:23 PM   #29
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Matthew, youi might call the market where you bought that chicken. Tell them it's cooking and smells bad and that you'd like your money back. You could offer to return in its cooked state, but my guess is they'll honor it. I have had to do it with beef before, and recently with a ham steak at WalMart. WalMart wanted it back ... the local grocery store took me at my word.

Maybe keep a small cooler in your trunk for these outings in the future. I always keep poultry in the rear of my frig or preferably in my older "spare" in the basement. It seems colder because it isn't constantly opened by kids opening just to seemingly STARE at the food. 50* is not a safe temp for chicken for any amount of time unless it was frozen when you bought it. :)

I agree with a recent poster who asked you to please log in and let us know that you aren't sick from eating tainted food.
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Old 02-20-2008, 01:28 PM   #30
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Who would have thought a simple question would turn into experiments. My top shelf was 39.6 degrees (US) and my bottom was was 42.3 degrees. Big difference. I guess I'll continue to double wrap my meat and keep it on that top shelf.
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