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Old 12-20-2013, 12:33 PM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cave76 View Post
I'm sure you're right, MadCook.

TaxLady said:

"However, I still have no idea how long to parboil meat to kill surface contamination."

Sorry for my part in hi-jacking your thread.
I don't mind the hijacking. It's interesting. I don't think of it as hijacking, but more as digression - like a flesh and blood conversation.

I just hope to get some info about my question.
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Old 12-20-2013, 12:40 PM   #72
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TaxLady said she didn't mind the 'hi-jacking' and found it interesting.

That's very kind of you TL.
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Old 12-20-2013, 02:24 PM   #73
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Cool video Pac.

However, I still have no idea how long to parboil meat to kill surface contamination.
Popular opinion was that you don't need to worry about it. Perhaps this could best be answered in the context of being safe for humans.
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Old 12-20-2013, 02:41 PM   #74
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Popular opinion was that you don't need to worry about it. Perhaps this could best be answered in the context of being safe for humans.

However, if you must do so, a quick immersion into boiling water will do the trick. Most food borne nasties are killed immediately at that temperature.
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Old 12-20-2013, 03:04 PM   #75
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I like well-aged beef. The fanciest restaurants will serve well-aged beef, some of it dry-aged, for incredible prices.
When a steak or primal cut has been dry aged the butcher or chef will scrape off the 'scum' that forms with a sharp knife. I've seen that being done by a friend who used to be a chef and cooked the best rib roasts I've ever had, at home.

Done commercially it's done under carefully controlled conditions. My friend didn't but evidently his experience guided him.
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Old 12-20-2013, 03:55 PM   #76
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However, if you must do so, a quick immersion into boiling water will do the trick. Most food borne nasties are killed immediately at that temperature.
Thanks Andy. Getting closer. That's pretty much what I figure, but I'm trying to find some documentation.
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Old 12-20-2013, 06:39 PM   #77
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TaxL----- trying to find documentation. That's a good idea. I've been on many a health forum where claims are made but no scientific documentation given.

One forum, though, pretty much insisted on the source being given. Even though science papers say something and then later retract that later, you can trace the information back through all it's iterations. That's how science works.

Being frivolous here, guys---- but if Fox News or National Enquirer says it, then look for more proof. Emoticon entered here to show this was a frivolous statement.
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Old 12-20-2013, 08:32 PM   #78
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Taxi----- I had a few minutes and started thinking about your request (as per your original post). I'm a research nerd at heart and love nothing more than a science puzzle.

So----- just noodling around on the Internet gave me some questions. No answers just maybe some clarification.

First of all the word parboil isn't the word you want. It's more likely "blanching".

The temp. of boiling water (212 F) will kill most human pathogens. But you're asking about animal pathogens. They may be close enough for your questions though. Then the time for blanching/parboiling is another problem.

My few minutes is over now. But maybe someone else will read this and run with it. I may do more tomorrow.

(Just to be clear----- I personally wouldn't worry about it. But you are and it makes an interesting topic, scientifically.)
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Old 12-20-2013, 08:39 PM   #79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cave76 View Post
Taxi----- I had a few minutes and started thinking about your request (as per your original post). I'm a research nerd at heart and love nothing more than a science puzzle.

So----- just noodling around on the Internet gave me some questions. No answers just maybe some clarification.

First of all the word parboil isn't the word you want. It's more likely "blanching".

The temp. of boiling water (212 F) will kill most human pathogens. But you're asking about animal pathogens. They may be close enough for your questions though. Then the time for blanching/parboiling is another problem.

My few minutes is over now. But maybe someone else will read this and run with it. I may do more tomorrow.

(Just to be clear----- I personally wouldn't worry about it. But you are and it makes an interesting topic, scientifically.)
Almost all the Googling I did came up with tables/lists of what internal temps that meat needs to reach to be safe. A BBC article said that rare steak was safe, if not contaminated by utensils, because the germs are on the outside and searing kills them.

I eventually tried Googling "temperature to kill bacteria on utensils". I got similar results, but one page said 15 seconds at 165F to kill salmonella, but it was a cooking site and they didn't reference any scientific research.

Thanks for looking.
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