"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Food and Kitchen Safety
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-26-2009, 08:14 AM   #21
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 623
Quote:
Originally Posted by freefallin1309 View Post
I had the crab apple face when I was a kid, the tree dropped them right off the side of my grandparents yard. Man that was nasty. You'd think as ugly as they are, no one would want to eat them :)

what about persimmons??

and you people who drink buttermilk, like my Dad used to?
all I can say is
__________________

__________________
ellakav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2009, 08:30 AM   #22
Executive Chef
 
Selkie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 3,796
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellakav View Post
what about persimmons??

and you people who drink buttermilk, like my Dad used to?
all I can say is
Forget the fruit... who first thought about eating oysters?!?!
__________________

__________________
"Food is our common ground, a universal experience." - James Beard
Selkie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2009, 09:04 AM   #23
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 623
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
Forget the fruit... who first thought about eating oysters?!?!


EEEEEWWWWWWW!!!!
I've been to dinner with people who just slurp them raw
right outta the shell

AAAAARRRRRGGGGHH!! it's just so wrong...
__________________
ellakav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2009, 03:04 PM   #24
Mr. Greenjeans
 
bigdaddy3k's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Chicago Area
Posts: 1,741
Quote:
Originally Posted by freefallin1309 View Post
I had the crab apple face when I was a kid, the tree dropped them right off the side of my grandparents yard. Man that was nasty. You'd think as ugly as they are, no one would want to eat them :)
I make it a habit to taste all crabapples I see. Why? Because there are really really good ones out there!! Not all crabs are alike. There is a decorative crabapple tree in a mall near my home. No one realizes that these apples are delicious and sweet and crisp, just small. probably about the size of a walnut (maybe a little larger). I first started doing it because I discovered an apple variety called Chestnut Crab that totally rock but rapidly go to mealy after picking. My source for these is 300 miles away (never found them any where else).
__________________
No matter how many Bibles he swears on, when a dog tells you he's a vegetarian, he's lying.
bigdaddy3k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2009, 11:11 PM   #25
Sous Chef
 
Chile Chef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Winter Park Fl, Or Bust!
Posts: 853
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMetalChef View Post
hate wearing gloves to handle them? Allergic to latex?

Found a great method to deal with capsaicin on your hands after handling chili peppers....

Here's what you do:

After you've chopped/mashed/fondled/whatever you intend to do with your peppers, apply a small amount (2-3T, more if you have big ham hands like me! ) of cooking oil. Cheap stuff will do fine.

Rub your hands down, top to bottom, COMPLETELY for a good 10 seconds - just as though you were washing your hands with soap.

Then, wash your hands just as thoroughly with soap and water.

Here's how it works:

Capsaicin is only soluble in fat. This is why it sticks to your tongue, and why drinking high fat-content milk or buttermilk is the best way to cure the burn.

This same principle works when cleaning your hands - the oil picks up the capsaicin, then you wash the oil away with the soap.

I love my chilies, and I hate latex gloves. This was a godsend for me when I stumbled across it one day after chopping some peppers for the dryer (I make my own chili powder out of habaneros, Thai prik peppers, and cayenne) - No more fiery hands! :)
Good tip mate, But you can also use Germ X, that stuff works really well for me.
__________________
Chile Chef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2009, 08:02 AM   #26
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
I'm definitely going to try this tip. I'm starting to dry peppers from the garden this year, which isn't the difficult part. It is when I slice and use my cayennes that are fresh, or turn my dried cayennes into chile flakes for cooking. Ironically, it isn't if I wipe my eyes that is the problem (eyes are surprisingly resilient, then just water and get the capsaicin out), but if I touch my nose or the area around my mouth. You'd be surprised how often you touch your nose. That delicate skin area (Gee, I just stopped to scratch the tip of my nose!) seems to keep the darned capsaiciin for hours. As do my fingers. But I believe the oil thing would work. When I was a kid, we learned to oil our fingers before pitting cherries to keep them from staining. Because I want to have dried chillies I can't oil before, but will try oiling my hands after.
__________________

__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.