"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Food and Kitchen Safety
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-25-2015, 04:32 AM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: RD3 CROMWELL
Posts: 27
Refrigerate after Opening, & use within 10 Mins

Well.....maybe not quite as bad as that. But more and more I am seeing these messages on food containers that may have stood happily on Supermarket shelves for months, totally uncooled.

So what is it that makes it so important to use within a short period of time ?

I have a genuine reason for asking this, because, as you all know, it is far more economical to buy a large tin/pot/jar/container of just about anything than it is to buy a small one.

And I am also totally prepared to believe that there are many products to which this sort of message would genuinely apply. Dairy based produce springs to mind.

But now I am seeing it on the most unlikely [ to me, anyway] of things. Thai Chilli Sauce. Farmhouse Pickle. Mustard. Apricot Chutney !!

So I am keen to find out just what it is about opening something that leads to these 'new' rules applying. Is it because it has been exposed to air ? And therefore, is cold air [ refrigerated] safer than warmer air ?

In the case of my 1KG Jar of Thai Chilli sauce, [ which I didn't notice had to be consumed within 3 weeks until I was home !] would it be safe to decant it into 4 x 250gm jars, full to the brim, and tightly screw the tops on ?

That is just a particular case in point, but am keen to find out the general principles behind it all.

I sometimes think that some manufacturers take advantage of the stricter rules and regs just to increase the sales of their own products.....but, of course, I could be wrong. I frequently am !

But the more I can find out from reliable sauces, [ sorry....couldn't resist it ] the better.

Many thanks.

__________________

__________________
No man was ever shot while doing the dishes.
Burnt-toast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2015, 06:42 AM   #2
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Burnt-toast View Post
Well.....maybe not quite as bad as that. But more and more I am seeing these messages on food containers that may have stood happily on Supermarket shelves for months, totally uncooled.

So what is it that makes it so important to use within a short period of time ?

I have a genuine reason for asking this, because, as you all know, it is far more economical to buy a large tin/pot/jar/container of just about anything than it is to buy a small one.

And I am also totally prepared to believe that there are many products to which this sort of message would genuinely apply. Dairy based produce springs to mind.

But now I am seeing it on the most unlikely [ to me, anyway] of things. Thai Chilli Sauce. Farmhouse Pickle. Mustard. Apricot Chutney !!

So I am keen to find out just what it is about opening something that leads to these 'new' rules applying. Is it because it has been exposed to air ? And therefore, is cold air [ refrigerated] safer than warmer air ?

In the case of my 1KG Jar of Thai Chilli sauce, [ which I didn't notice had to be consumed within 3 weeks until I was home !] would it be safe to decant it into 4 x 250gm jars, full to the brim, and tightly screw the tops on ?

That is just a particular case in point, but am keen to find out the general principles behind it all.

I sometimes think that some manufacturers take advantage of the stricter rules and regs just to increase the sales of their own products.....but, of course, I could be wrong. I frequently am !

But the more I can find out from reliable sauces, [ sorry....couldn't resist it ] the better.

Many thanks.
"So what is it that makes it so important to use within a short period of time?" Fear of being sued?

Seriously, though could you freeze the jars that you don't need? Or can them?
__________________

__________________
Don’t look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2015, 10:07 AM   #3
Senior Cook
 
mozart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 419
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
"So what is it that makes it so important to use within a short period of time?" Fear of being sued?

Seriously, though could you freeze the jars that you don't need? Or can them?
The main reason is companies have discovered that the new push to put dates on everything allows them to to suggest that a product should be used by a certain date or time from opening. These dates and times are only based on potential loss of food quality or taste and not based on health reasons.

Use the same method you used before to determine what to keep and what to throw out.
__________________
mozart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2015, 10:38 AM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,866
Once you open a sealed container, it becomes contaminated from microbes floating in the air (doesn't matter whether it's warm or cold), or on a utensil you've used to remove some of the item from the container. More acidic ingredients (citrus juice, vinegar, etc.) can prevent mold, etc., from growing for a while, but less acidic items will go bad faster.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2015, 06:49 PM   #5
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: RD3 CROMWELL
Posts: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Once you open a sealed container, it becomes contaminated from microbes floating in the air (doesn't matter whether it's warm or cold), or on a utensil you've used to remove some of the item from the container. More acidic ingredients (citrus juice, vinegar, etc.) can prevent mold, etc., from growing for a while, but less acidic items will go bad faster.
Thanks for that. So is it all about mold growth ?

And if it doesn't make any difference whether it's warm or cold, why does everything have to be 'Refrigerated after Opening' ?

Also, if it's about exposure to air, then surely a tall thin container would be a lot safer than a short fat one ? [Talking about decanting]...especially if filled to the brim and well sealed ?

Finally....can you freeze EVERYTHING ?

Cheers.
__________________
No man was ever shot while doing the dishes.
Burnt-toast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2015, 06:55 PM   #6
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: RD3 CROMWELL
Posts: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by mozart View Post
These dates and times are only based on potential loss of food quality or taste and not based on health reasons.
I'm sure you are right, but surely it should be the 'Health and Safety' factor that these things should be based on ?

If something doesn't taste quite so good, but is not dangerous, what does it matter ?

Or maybe there should be 2 Dates.....'Safe Before....', and 'Best Taste Before...' ??

And in many cases there are so many numbers and ingredients, and heaven knows what else on today's packaging, it's hard to see the wood for the trees.
__________________
No man was ever shot while doing the dishes.
Burnt-toast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2015, 06:58 PM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,866
Quote:
Originally Posted by Burnt-toast View Post
Thanks for that. So is it all about mold growth ?

And if it doesn't make any difference whether it's warm or cold, why does everything have to be 'Refrigerated after Opening' ?

Also, if it's about exposure to air, then surely a tall thin container would be a lot safer than a short fat one ? [Talking about decanting]...especially if filled to the brim and well sealed ?

Finally....can you freeze EVERYTHING ?

Cheers.
No, it's not all about mold growth. That's why I said, "...mold, etc." There are other potentially toxic microbes.

Refrigerate after opening because the cold inhibits bacteria and mold growth.

re: the container: don't know. I'm not a scientist, just someone educated in food safety.

You can freeze everything. Quality after thawing will vary considerably and will affect how you can then use the item.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2015, 06:59 PM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,866
Quote:
Originally Posted by Burnt-toast View Post
I'm sure you are right, but surely it should be the 'Health and Safety' factor that these things should be based on ?

If something doesn't taste quite so good, but is not dangerous, what does it matter ?

Or maybe there should be 2 Dates.....'Safe Before....', and 'Best Taste Before...' ??

And in many cases there are so many numbers and ingredients, and heaven knows what else on today's packaging, it's hard to see the wood for the trees.
If something doesn't taste good, people won't buy it again and the company will lose money.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2015, 10:00 PM   #9
Head Chef
 
salt and pepper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Montana
Posts: 2,026
Bacteria grow fastest at room temp, so cooler temps slow the growth of bacteria. Freezing stops the growth of bacteria.
__________________
salt and pepper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2015, 10:29 PM   #10
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: RD3 CROMWELL
Posts: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
If something doesn't taste good, people won't buy it again and the company will lose money.
I don't care about that. It's the Health and Safety issue these things should be based on. Not a Company's Balance Sheet.

It's opened the door for widespread mis-information just so companies can reduce the time food is OK for, and make more money by re-selling more of the same, before strictly necessary.
__________________

__________________
No man was ever shot while doing the dishes.
Burnt-toast is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:08 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.