"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Food and Kitchen Safety
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-21-2006, 12:07 AM   #1
Assistant Cook
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 3
Rotten Eggs?

So, I am in the middle of making the "batter" for my cheese cake and I crack in what I assume was a rotten egg (as it smelled). The other eggs in there (2 previously cracked in) were just fine. Now, here I am with the dilemma of using the "batter" and hope that it cooks off or starting all over again.

My question is whether that one bad egg will cause problems or not.

I know it sounds silly, but this is the first time in a long time of cooking that this has happened.

Little help?


love2cook21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2006, 12:25 AM   #2
Head Chef
auntdot's Avatar
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,418
If the egg smells I cannot believe the battered dish will taste all that good.

I would start again, sorry.

Always break my eggs into a bowl and then add them to a mixture, one by one, so if there is something wrong with one egg I can just toss it without having to discard everything.

But that may be a little too obsessive for many.

Good luck.

auntdot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2006, 12:30 AM   #3
Assistant Cook
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 3
I just happened to have some left over batter from a previous batch (with good eggs) and I did a side by side test (perhaps not the smartest idea, but oh well) and the one with the bad egg seemed to taste fine.
love2cook21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2006, 04:42 AM   #4
Assistant Cook
prada's Avatar
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 41
that is why you always crack it open on one bowl and transfer it. It might be time consuming but it is better to be safe than sorry :) a bad egg can ruin everything
prada is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2006, 05:01 AM   #5
Executive Chef
VeraBlue's Avatar
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: northern NJ
Posts: 3,683
I would have tossed the whole thing. I was buying free range eggs for awhile and the rotten egg syndrome was prevalent enough for me to go back to eggs from a more modern farm. Unfortunate, because I don't care for that method, at all....but I care less for having to toss out an egg for each dozen I buy. Not sure what the correlation was to free range vs bad egg.

In the future, you may consider cracking your eggs into a bowl, rather into the batter. It's also a good way to prevent shells from entering your recipe.
How can we sleep while our beds are burning???
VeraBlue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2006, 11:55 AM   #6
Head Chef
Caine's Avatar
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 2,314
Send a message via MSN to Caine
When I make any kind of baked goods, I always use two bowls, one to sift the dry ingredients into, and one to combine the wet ingredients, which is usually the Kitchen-Aid bowl. Eggs are always the first to go into the wet ingredients bowl, so I have never had the need to dirty another bowl to crack eggs into.

BTW, I have never, ever, found a rotten egg in the 30 plus years I have been cooking and baking.
Caine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2006, 12:03 PM   #7
Executive Chef
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 4,764
Send a message via MSN to urmaniac13 Send a message via Skype™ to urmaniac13
Another way to avoid a rotten egg, check the date when you buy the eggs, get the freshest ones that are available. They should have the date of collection and also expiration printed on the package, and make sure to use them up well before the expiration. Which I usually never have to worry about they are used up quickly enough... Fresh eggs do make the difference in flavour and texture, especially in desserts!
urmaniac13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2006, 12:05 PM   #8
Executive Chef
Half Baked's Avatar
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,927
Originally Posted by Caine
BTW, I have never, ever, found a rotten egg in the 30 plus years I have been cooking and baking.
Me neither, Caine.
Please spay and neuter your pets. The Animal Rescue Site
Half Baked is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2006, 12:13 PM   #9
Master Chef
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
The term "fresh" egg as far as commercial supermarket eggs go is an enigma at best, as those eggs can be stored for quite some time in refrigerated warehouses before being sold, & yet can still be marketed as "fresh". You can easily tell the freshness of your eggs when you crack them into a pan or bowl. A truly fresh egg will have a yolk surrounded by a high compact white - sometimes not much bigger than the yolk itself. As the egg ages, the yolk becomes flatter & more watery, thus starts spreading all over the pan. Very few supermarket eggs DON'T do this, which alone should tell you how old they already are. It's an unfortunate fact that commercial egg producers take full advantage of the fact that properly stored eggs can remain edible for an unbelievably long time. However, that spreading does NOT mean the egg is not perfectly safe to eat/use - just shows you that the egg has definitely been "out of the hen" for probably more than a week. Any egg that smells, however, has actually spoiled, & just like any other spoiled product, should immediately be thrown away. Period.

That aside, the only way to prevent your cooking from becoming contaminated from an egg that is truly rotten is just as others have posted - breaking your eggs into a separate container before adding them to your recipe. And regardless of how your end product ended up tasting, you were (& are) really taking quite a health risk by knowingly consuming a spoiled/rotten egg - cooked through or not. No amount of other ingredients involved would have prevented me from tossing that batch. Yuck.
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2006, 01:13 PM   #10
Head Chef
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Southern California
Posts: 2,038

If there is a rotten egg in your mixture I don't think that is good. If you are out of eggs go to the market and get more eggs. I would definitely start over.

Have a have day.

Jill and Jolie

shpj4 is offline   Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities

Copyright 2002-2015 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:01 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.