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Old 11-26-2011, 12:19 PM   #21
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Maybe the bubbles were from the beans and lentils, when you cook them the scummy, frothy substance sits on the top of the water, might have been this?
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Old 10-25-2012, 06:06 PM   #22
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This question was asked years ago, but my mother had the same question for me......the answer simply lies in the potatoes. Potatoes are high in carbs (complex sugars) and starch. This is why potatoes are used to make Vodka! The sugars, in this case, reacted with the amylase found in the grains! Thusly, alcohol was produced and created a pungent, bubbly, flavor ruining effect!

simply put, if potatoes are added to a soup with grains it must be done so in the proper manner. (boiling potatoes before adding them to the soup!)
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Old 10-25-2012, 06:08 PM   #23
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ahh the wonders of chemistry ;)
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Old 10-25-2012, 07:44 PM   #24
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Call me skeptical, but I just ain't buying it.

I've been fermenting foods (on purpose) for well over 20 years. I make my own wine, sauerkraut, fermented hot sauces, bread, and occasionally cheese, and I can tell you that fermentation does not happen this quickly.

First of all, boiling the soup would kill any natural yeast or lactobacillus that happened to be in the soup or any of the ingredients added to it. Yeast is killed above 110F and LAB at around 140F. There are other bacteria that will survive higher temperatures, but those are not nearly as common.

Now sitting on the stovetop, the soup would eventually cool down to a temperature where bacteria and yeast in the air would begin to colonize again, but it would take longer than four hours and much longer with a lid on the pot.

But for the sake of argument, let's say that a colony of yeast did manage to make it's way into the soup. Once it got there, it would initially have nothing to eat. The previous poster mentions amylase, which is an enzyme that is present in flour and starts to break starch down into fermentable sugars once you add water. If there were flour used to thicken the soup, there would be amylase present. However, the problem is that amylase is destroyed by the cooking process.

If the OP added sugar to the soup, that would initially give yeast something to munch on, but I still find it unlikely that a feral yeast strain would colonize that quickly. And they do establish a colony before they begin metabolizing sugar. In winemaking, we call this the lag phase, and it can take anywhere from 6 to 12 hours - sometimes even longer.

So all of this makes fermentation highly unlikely. I'm not saying it couldn't happen, but I would look more for either a chemical reaction of some sort, or the possibility that something was added after the soup cooled that was possibly contaminated. Or the soup didn't cook completely or sat for longer than 4 hours. Or maybe the soup was simply not cooked at as high a temperature as the OP believes. Those are more likely scenarios.
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Old 10-27-2012, 03:09 AM   #25
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You're certainly not a dummy.....but you are dwelling on yeast as the anaerobic agent where in this case I'm discussing the enzyme amylase.

Likely scenarios do indeed include sitting for longer then 4 hours....as well as being in a pressurized environ after having the lid slapped on.

Lets say the 4 hrs became 6 hrs.....and you mention that sugar needed to be added.....did you miss the fact that starch is sugar? Or that there are certainly enough possibilities for chemical reactions when creating a soup??

Amylase converts starchs into sugars. Bro.
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Old 10-27-2012, 03:12 AM   #26
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Plus, there's always botchulism

;)

I reread your post and see you mention amylase and its breakdown of starches.....

Amylase is present in grains, wheats, saliva etc....
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Old 10-27-2012, 03:16 AM   #27
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Vinegar.
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Old 10-27-2012, 09:51 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by notachefjustagoodcook View Post
I reread your post and see you mention amylase and its breakdown of starches.....

Amylase is present in grains, wheats, saliva etc....
And amylase is destroyed by the cooking process... as I pointed out in my post. 10 minutes at 175F. Bro.
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Old 10-27-2012, 12:07 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
And amylase is destroyed by the cooking process... as I pointed out in my post. 10 minutes at 175F. Bro.
As far as I have seen through my experiments, many enzymes including amylase do not denature until they are above 212F. If in fact the OP boiled his soup, which is not common to do except in the very early stages of creating a stock, than perhaps all of the amylase was destroyed. It is also common to add your grains to the soup at the end of the simmer after all veggies have been cooked and the soup has been allowed to reduce. Partial denaturing is quite plausible, but one must remember that no chemical reaction is 100% efficient until catalyzed. Even if a catalyst is used, the reaction never reaches 100% efficiency.

My postulate remains...........the starches and sugars in the veggies remained in solution until the amylase was added to the solution at which point the starch was further converted to glucose. This high sugar solution was left out at a moderate temperature cooling quickly due to the high surface area of a stove pot and was set into a pressurized container into the fridge. Also, as you have stated, perhaps the OP didn't cook at a high temperature.
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Old 10-27-2012, 01:11 PM   #30
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Welcome to DC, notachefjustagoodcook! What an interesting way to start off - people don't usually join the forum by arguing about an almost four-year-old thread, so why don't you head over to the Introductions section and tell us about yourself?
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