"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Food and Kitchen Safety
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-13-2011, 01:33 PM   #1
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,113
Sour-cream advice?

I am so happy I can come here to DC and ask you all......Stupid me, I bought too much cream on sale and now it's well past it's use by date. I 'was gonna' make ice cream, which I did, but, just not all of it that I had hoped to make.

I have 2 quarts of cream and 1 quart of half and half.

So, does cream (heavy whipping cream also half and half) turn to sour cream, or does cream just become 'bad'?

The half and half had thick parts, but did not smell bad.

Also, about sour cream, does it go 'bad'? It's sour already, you know? Please don't say, if in doubt throw it out. Just because I don't know something or have a doubt, doesn't justify throwing out food. However, if you know something is bad, I have no problem throwing it out.

I just need to know more about mechanics of cream, anyone know?
__________________

__________________
blissful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2011, 01:59 PM   #2
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,362
Creams and Half and Half do not become sour cream when they spoil. They become spoiled. If it has thick parts to it it's time to toss it.

Sour cream does go bad. It grows mold.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2011, 02:10 PM   #3
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,113
Thanks Andy M.
Okay!
So I have unusable bad cream and half and half.

When making cheese: milk, cheese bacterias, salt, rennet, processing, it becomes cheese.

So when I make yogurt and add the yogurt culture to the milk, it becomes yogurt.

And when I take good cream (not apparently what I have now) I add, what exactly to make sour cream, if I wanted to make it? Curious minds want to know.

I wonder if McNerd would know?
__________________
blissful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2011, 02:18 PM   #4
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,362
Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
...And when I take good cream (not apparently what I have now) I add, what exactly to make sour cream, if I wanted to make it? Curious minds want to know.

I wonder if McNerd would know?

Google would know.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2011, 02:22 PM   #5
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Google would know.
Yes, most likely, but, DC loves me more than Google.
__________________
blissful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2011, 02:25 PM   #6
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,362
Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
Yes, most likely, but, DC loves me more than Google.

Without a doubt.

Just if you are looking for a quick answer to wrap up this issue, google could do that for you.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2011, 03:34 PM   #7
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Without a doubt.

Just if you are looking for a quick answer to wrap up this issue, google could do that for you.
Nope, not looking for a quick answer to wrap up this issue.
__________________
blissful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2011, 04:33 PM   #8
Senior Cook
 
AnnieDrews's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 409
Edited this out because the next link I visited said this:

"Sour cream cannot be made at home with pasteurized cream; the lack of bacteria in the cream will cause the cream to spoil instead of sour. If you have access to unpasteruized heavy cream, you can add 1 Tbsp of vinegar to 2 cups of cream and let the mixture stand out at room temperature for several hours until curdled."

The article goes on to say:

"If you can’t get unpasteurized cream, you can still make a version of crème fraîche, which is also a soured cream. The taste is generally milder than that of sour cream, but it may be an acceptable substitute for you in recipes that call for sour cream. You can make crème fraîche by adding 1 cup of buttermilk to 2 cups of heavy cream and leaving it out in a warm place (80° to 90°F, or 26° to 32°C, is ideal) for as few as eight hours and as many as 24 hours. One of the benefits of crème fraîche is that it can be whipped."
__________________
AnnieDrews is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2011, 06:26 PM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,875
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
Thanks Andy M.
Okay!
So I have unusable bad cream and half and half.

When making cheese: milk, cheese bacterias, salt, rennet, processing, it becomes cheese.

So when I make yogurt and add the yogurt culture to the milk, it becomes yogurt.

And when I take good cream (not apparently what I have now) I add, what exactly to make sour cream, if I wanted to make it? Curious minds want to know.

I wonder if McNerd would know?
To make sour cream, you would add sour cream or cultured buttermilk. I do it all the time. If my cream is getting close to the use by date, I make sour cream and extend its life by a week or more. When sour cream goes off, it usually grows mould.

Unpasteurized cream can turn into sour cream or crème fraiche without addition of a starter.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2011, 01:50 PM   #10
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,113
Being from the dairy state, there is a long disagreement on whether we should be able to buy part of a milking animal and get a portion of unpasturized milk.
Seems to me that adding buttermilk or sour cream would re-inoculate pasturized milk products with the same cultures originally removed with pasturization, similarly to not pasturizing it in the first place.

Anyways, the sour cream was good--no spoilage.
The cream was not sour (even after 1 and 1/2 months past the date), not lumpy, smelled and tasted sweet/good. We made cherry ice cream with it.

I've never fully taken one side of the issue or the other. Isn't it amazing that pasturized cream was good after 1 and 1/2 months past the date on the carton?
I wonder how long unpasturized cream lasts?

Thank you all for your help.
__________________

__________________
blissful is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:09 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.