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Old 05-19-2012, 09:52 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by FrankZ View Post
It makes you shorter....

Ahhh... I see...

At 5'6", I'm short enough--I can hardly reach the upper cabinets in the kitchen.
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Old 05-19-2012, 10:23 PM   #12
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Quote:
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It makes you shorter....

Ahhh... I see...

Ahhh...a Short Cut! brilliant
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Old 05-19-2012, 10:28 PM   #13
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I don't use hot tap water for the simple reason that when you heat water the dissolved gasses come out. This is why you sometimes hear the water heater bubbling when you turn on the hot water taps. Water tastes better with dissolved gasses particularly oxygen. It is dead when they are evaporated and missing in the water.

If your water heater and piping are designed properly, and if you have a clean municipal water then you should have no worries about your water, hot or cold. I see no reason to not drink (or otherwise consume) the hot water except that it will taste dead. If your cold water is not fit for consumption then your hot water won't be fit either, but if you drink the cold tap water then I see no other reason to not drink or consume hot water--except that it will be dead because all the dissolved gasses are gone.

Your hot water should be set to the correct temperature. You can use an instant read thermometer to calibrate it, just let the water run for long enough to reach steady state and measure it. Change the thermostat depending on whether it's too hot or too cold. It should be hot enough to ensure that bacteria cannot grow in your hot water tank. It should be not so hot that it constitutes a scalding hazard. I'll leave it up to everybody to Google and read some articles to determine for themselves which is the best temperature.

If your municipal water is safe, if your plumbing and hot water heater are correctly designed, then there is no reason you cannot consume your hot water other than the flat taste. Myself, I always use cold tap water, for the taste.
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Old 05-19-2012, 11:14 PM   #14
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I never use the hot tap water for consumption. Really it is by habit.

I did see to remember something about not using hot tap water for Netipots as it can risk some brain eating nasty that can't get you from drinking, only from snorting the water.
Not even an unusual organism or one that you can't ingest without harm. The gastrointestinal system is tuned up to handle a great deal and to resist a lot more. For instance, you can get giardiasis from drinking directly from open water sources like streams and ponds, but the odds are that you could be exposed many times through that behavior and not become ill.

But a lot of our sensory system is really the brain extruding outside the cranial vault. You eyes are continuous with the optic nerve that is really just part of the brain. The sinuses are barely separated from the brain. The inner ear is arguably a brain portal. And the brain is not at all adept at handling infections. The blood-brain barrier cannot pass most dangerous infections, and when one does get through from somewhere, the same mechanism prevents antibiotics from passing into the brain, making brain infections very difficult to treat. Pumping water and whatever is in it up your nose is driving it right at the brain. (Doing "cannonballs" in open lakes and streams can do essentially the same thing, and they see similar infections and death rates from them from that cause as from the nasal irrigation.)

But even with that known, many, many people use tap water with Neti-Pots and have no problem, because the body is pretty good at its job. But the body can only do so much, and I wonder if those who got in trouble weren't frequent users. Frequent exposure does indeed make a difference.

I had a guy who usually shot up his dope with tap water. One night, he had scored and found himself along an urban creek that ran below an area where sewers leaked. He had never had a problem with tap water, in spite of the bugs that are always in it. But after shooting up sewery creek water, he died a lingering death from such an array of infections that they couldn't document them all.


On the hot/cold tap water thing, I'm kind of with Greg. The hot water side just turns out to be not so appealing in terms of taste. But I do get the jump on boiling water for pasta (usual wimpy residential duty gas range problem) by starting with it as hot as the water heater can deliver, which is pretty hot, since we are adults of (on a good day) nearly normal intelligence who have no children to scald themselves.
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Old 05-19-2012, 11:30 PM   #15
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The most important point about consuming hot tap water is that your hot water heater thermostat must be set above a certain minimum temperature or there is danger that various hot water organisms can exist and multiply in your hot water heater and may be a hazard for human consumption. I don't want to get in any argument about exactly what that temperature is (I'm no authority) and I invite everybody to use a search engine and read authoritative sources for advice as to the correct minimum temperature.

And second, just from the aspect of science and physics. It takes the same amount of heat energy to raise the heat of the water no matter whether you use hot tap water from your heater or heat cold tap water on your stove. There many be minor differences in the efficiency of your hot water heater vs. your pot on your stove. The primary differences are (1) it's quicker to use hot tap water because it's already part way hot, and (2) the hot tap water may not taste as good as heating cold tap water because it's had some of the dissolved gases evaporated out of it, probably for many hours in most cases, depending on your household rate of water consumption.

In the end as long as your hot water heater is set properly there is probably not much difference either way. But I prefer heating cold tap water when cooking. Okay maybe not important when boiling pasta because you're going to throw out most of the water anyway. (Italian cooking aficionados probably use the pasta water for something, might make a difference there.)

Set the hot water heater temperature properly and no big deal either way.
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Old 05-19-2012, 11:34 PM   #16
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Greg, maybe you live in a house that is new enough that you have no concern that there might be lead solder leaching into the water. That's the bigger concern for me.
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Old 05-19-2012, 11:39 PM   #17
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Our apartment building was built in the 1970's, with the various plumbing problems we have had in 12 years, I don't trust our plumbing to be up to snuff. We also have very hard water (high mineral content) and I prefer to use the coldest water out of the tap and filter that for consumption, even for boiling water for pasta.
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Old 05-20-2012, 12:57 AM   #18
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did not know about hot water being unsafe to consume. long ago, i used to use hot water for heating water as a convenient short cut way to reaching a boil. i stopped doing it simply because i didn't want to waste water by running the tap long enough to get hot. good to know, thank you tl and frank....

but i think i'm more likely to have a mineral deficiency than an excess.
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Old 05-20-2012, 06:25 AM   #19
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The hot tap water that I've sampled at the various locations where I've lived had an off taste. Many residences, including my present one, have tankless hot water heaters and some of us (including my 94 and 103 year old neighbors) do not enjoy the 'benefits' of chlorinated water.
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Old 05-20-2012, 10:18 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
Our apartment building was built in the 1970's, with the various plumbing problems we have had in 12 years, I don't trust our plumbing to be up to snuff. We also have very hard water (high mineral content) and I prefer to use the coldest water out of the tap and filter that for consumption, even for boiling water for pasta.
The house in the City was built in the 70s. One of the things I had done recently (2005) was to have all the plumbing upgraded. I didn't have any lead pipes, but there were other issues.
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