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Old 05-19-2012, 12:58 PM   #1
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Using Hot Tap Water.

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Originally Posted by AZFoodie View Post
I rarely cook plain rice in an oven because it is so easy to cook plain rice on the stovetop. I do however cook Indian biryani and pulao's in the oven. Here's how I would cook the rice. I am assuming you want to start with 2 cups of raw basmati rice.

Rinse 2.5 cups (yes, little more than you need) of rice with cold water until the water runs clear. Leave the rice soaking in cold water for about 20 minutes. This step is important or the rice will not cook.

Drain the rice and add to a dutch oven. Add 2.5 cups of hot tap water. Add salt to taste.

Seal the dutch oven with two sheets of foil and then with the dutch oven lid.

Place in a 375 degree oven for 60 minutes. Check and see if the rice is cooked at this point. If its not, re-seal and continue to bake for an additional 30 minutes.

Remove from oven. Add a tablespoon of butter and salt (if needed). Fluff with a fork. Remove to a platter or bowl and serve.

If you used a non-stick dutch oven, you can flip the rice onto a plate or tray so that the rice resembles a golden brown cake. The brown, crispy rice on the outside is considered to be a delicacy in some cuisines.
Never use water from the hot tap for food or beverages. It isn't safe. There can be micro-organisms from the water heater and there can be heavy metals from the pipes. It isn't intended for drinking or eating. Just heat some water from the cold tap (or your water filter) in a kettle or saucepan.

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Old 05-19-2012, 02:53 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Never use water from the hot tap for food or beverages. It isn't safe. There can be micro-organisms from the water heater and there can be heavy metals from the pipes. It isn't intended for drinking or eating. Just heat some water from the cold tap (or your water filter) in a kettle or saucepan.
A lot of this stuff comes from companies in the business of selling home water filter and distilling systems. And from people just guessing and answering questions on Ask or Yahoo Answers when they don't really know. There is, in fact, one caution about consuming water from the hot tap, which I'll talk about at the end.

A water heater is lined with glass or ceramic. No significant exposed metals in the tank.

The material that is precipitated out in the tank is primarily calcium and magnesium. And of course, having precipitated, it does not go back into solution. Plus, they are essential elements for humans and might or might not be a good or bad factor in heart health. Studies are inconclusive and in conflict.

The water is still chlorinated and therefore still effectively protected against most organisms. If you don't have faith in the effectiveness of chlorination, you should certain not drink the cold water, either. Ask and water department worker or firefighter what comes out of the pipe when you flush a water main.

It would be a very rare home that had lead pipes. They are iron, copper, or PVC. The 1986 Safe Drinking Water Act as amended in 1996 (USEPA, 2000) banned all lead plumbing solder and pipe and all brass containing more than 8 percent lead. If you have lead pipes, don't drink the cold water, either. If you're worried about some difference in how readily hot and cold water leach lead, why are you still living with lead pipes and fixtures?

Water heaters should be set to at least 140F. If you set yours to 120F, you are just challenging the chlorination to handle an good breeding temperature for many organism. This is not an issue of domestic hot water being unsafe. It is an issue of a consumer misusing a piece of equipment. Just because you set it to 120F to make it safe for children to expose themselves to unmixed hot water doesn't make it a proper use of the water heater. It's just an easy way out to avoid the proper solution, a temperature control at the water use point.

Make your own decisions, but know why.
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Old 05-19-2012, 03:39 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GLC View Post
A lot of this stuff comes from companies in the business of selling home water filter and distilling systems. And from people just guessing and answering questions on Ask or Yahoo Answers when they don't really know. There is, in fact, one caution about consuming water from the hot tap, which I'll talk about at the end.

A water heater is lined with glass or ceramic. No significant exposed metals in the tank.

The material that is precipitated out in the tank is primarily calcium and magnesium. And of course, having precipitated, it does not go back into solution. Plus, they are essential elements for humans and might or might not be a good or bad factor in heart health. Studies are inconclusive and in conflict.

The water is still chlorinated and therefore still effectively protected against most organisms. If you don't have faith in the effectiveness of chlorination, you should certain not drink the cold water, either. Ask and water department worker or firefighter what comes out of the pipe when you flush a water main.

It would be a very rare home that had lead pipes. They are iron, copper, or PVC. The 1986 Safe Drinking Water Act as amended in 1996 (USEPA, 2000) banned all lead plumbing solder and pipe and all brass containing more than 8 percent lead. If you have lead pipes, don't drink the cold water, either. If you're worried about some difference in how readily hot and cold water leach lead, why are you still living with lead pipes and fixtures?

Water heaters should be set to at least 140F. If you set yours to 120F, you are just challenging the chlorination to handle an good breeding temperature for many organism. This is not an issue of domestic hot water being unsafe. It is an issue of a consumer misusing a piece of equipment. Just because you set it to 120F to make it safe for children to expose themselves to unmixed hot water doesn't make it a proper use of the water heater. It's just an easy way out to avoid the proper solution, a temperature control at the water use point.

Make your own decisions, but know why.
I have researched this on the web numerous times. I find trustworthy sites like, Hydro-Québec - Water heaters and Lead in Drinking Water | Lead | US EPA.

Hydro Québec, the government owned electricity company in Quebec says that "...an estimated 25% of all water heaters are contaminated by legionella bacteria."

According to the US EPA, "However, new homes are also at risk: even legally “lead-free” plumbing may contain up to 8 percent lead. The most common problem is with brass or chrome-plated brass faucets and fixtures which can leach significant amounts of lead into the water, especially hot water."

Hot water dissolves more contaminants into the water than cold water does.

Most people don't live in homes built since 1996 and not everyone lives in the US, where the law applies.

Lots of people don't know that they should leave their water heaters at 140F (60C). I think ours is set to 160F, we don't have any children. Lots of people don't have the kind of faucet that makes the higher temperatures safer.

Worried about lead pipes? Not usually the issue, it's lead solder that is far more likely. I'm sure there is lead solder on my pipes, even if it isn't used any more and I don't know if it is still used in Canada. More lead leaches into hot water than into cold. I use a Britta water filter - not perfect, but it removes most of that stuff (not the micro-organisms). I also run the cold water until it gets cold, so I know it isn't water that has been sitting in my pipes, leaching stuff.

I just don't see it as being a big inconvenience to only use water from the cold tap.
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Old 05-19-2012, 07:18 PM   #4
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I split these posts off from the original thread on Preparing Rice in the Oven as I thought it was a great discussion topic in its own right.
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Old 05-19-2012, 07:40 PM   #5
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I always start with cold tap water. That's what my mom did and my grandmother did. I don't have a scientific reason for it, just the way it was done.
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Old 05-19-2012, 07:43 PM   #6
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GLC, if you live in an old city like Boston, you will find a lot of the buildings still have lead pipes. In fact we still have some carved out tree trunks that our city water runs through. They all get replaced when something goes wrong. In Boston, you cannot rent an apartment or home that has lead pipes in the apartment or living quarters. You must replace all the pipes throughout the apartments before you can get a "Fit for Occupancy" certificate. But that doesn't mean there aren't lead pipes in the cellar coming in from the street. You only have to replace the pipes in the living quarters. If and when the pipes in the cellar break or spring a leak, you must replace all of the lead piping. Not just the part that is leaking. Most of the tenement and walkup apartments were built in the early 1900's. It wasn't until the 1950's that is was determined for sure that lead poisoning was affecting our children.

The City of Boston went on a rampage (a good one) and ordered that all children be tested for lead poisoning. It was introduced in every school. Done in every doctor's office, In all ERs. Anywhere that a child came in contract with health care. A lot of the immigrants didn't understand why. But they had no choice.

As a result of the seriousness of the problem, most of our buildings are now free of lead pipes. But there are still some out there. Everytime a renter registers a complaint with the Building Department for any Code violation, the BD can order that any found lead pipes be replaced, no matter where they are, no matter what the original complaint was. Even in the cellar.

We now have smarter kids.
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Old 05-19-2012, 08:00 PM   #7
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In order for Calcium and Magnesium to have the ability to precipitate out of solution there has to be a high concentration of the metals in solution. This means there are high concentrations of both and other metals in your hot water tank.

Use cold water and heat it up, reduce the risk of overdosing your system with metals your body doesn't need.
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Old 05-19-2012, 09:02 PM   #8
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I never use the hot tap water for consumption. Really it is by habit.

I did see to remember something about not using hot tap water for Netipots as it can risk some brain eating nasty that can't get you from drinking, only from snorting the water.
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Old 05-19-2012, 09:15 PM   #9
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I never use the hot tap water for consumption. Really it is by habit.

I did see to remember something about not using hot tap water for Netipots as it can risk some brain eating nasty that can't get you from drinking, only from snorting the water.
What can you get from snorting Pepsi???
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Old 05-19-2012, 09:50 PM   #10
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What can you get from snorting Pepsi???

It makes you shorter....

Ahhh... I see...

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