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Old 11-29-2007, 11:51 PM   #11
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My understanding was/is similar to Kitchenelf's, in that I was told the cans oxidise and that taint will ruin the remainder of the contents. Having been lazy on numerous occasions, esp with a small can of sandwich tuna, I often won't have enough to dirty another dish for, so I'll leave it in the fridge with just some cling wrap on and it is okay for a day or so but after that, yeuch.

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I wish they made small cans of tomato paste. I only use maybe a tablespoon or so at a time. So I transfer it to a freezer box, and place it in the freezer for later use. Then the next time I need tomato paste I open another can only to realize later I had some in the freezer already!!
We're lucky here. Our tomato paste comes in sachets, tubs, tubes and squeeze bottles. Not even sure if we can get the cans anymore. Used to but I think they replaced them all with various plastic containers.
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Old 11-30-2007, 12:02 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
I wish they made small cans of tomato paste. I only use maybe a tablespoon or so at a time. So I transfer it to a freezer box, and place it in the freezer for later use. Then the next time I need tomato paste I open another can only to realize later I had some in the freezer already!!

I keep a tube of triple concentrate tomato paste around for this very reason! If I open a can and have leftovers I measure out 1 TBS of tomato paste and put it on a cookie sheet and freeze for an hour or two then place them all in a ziplock baggie - I can remove 1 TBS at a time - WHEN I remember they are in there .............
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Old 11-30-2007, 12:34 AM   #13
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Two things:

Air is the main enemy - once a can is opened, air gets in and the clock starts ticking ... stored in the can or in another container - it is no longer vacuum sealed.

You can store the food in a can for a day or two at most ... but DO NOT cover the can with aluminum foil! Look in the pet food aisle of your grocery store and get some plastic lid covers - or use plastic wrap and a rubber band to make sure it is well sealed.

When you cover a can with aluminum foil, unless the can is also 100% aluminum, the dissimilar metals will react ... and aluminum will leech into the food (condensation from a room temp can hitting the aluminum foil will drop back into the food). If the food is acidic ... the reaction is increased.

Some food - like canned fruits, especially - will pick up a metalic taste after being opened if stored in the can (an oxidation recation that doesn't happen as long as the can is sealed) ... fruits in lined cans like kitchenelf mentioned are less prone to that problem.

Hope this helps ...
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Old 11-30-2007, 06:37 AM   #14
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actually i have also been told about this that when you open a can of something and you don't use the whole thing it should be transferred into another container. i usually keep small plastic tupperwares or those disposable plastic containers that are microwaveable to store whatever excess it is that i don't use.
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Old 11-30-2007, 06:42 AM   #15
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They sell tomato paste in a tube, but I have been able to find it in my area. I purchased a plastic ice cube tray and then I take the small can and take tablespoons of tomato paste and place it in the tray and then cover with plastic wrap and freeze - when frozen I pop them out and and store in a freezer bag ready to use. Works great.
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Old 11-30-2007, 08:51 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Bilby View Post
We're lucky here. Our tomato paste comes in sachets, tubs, tubes and squeeze bottles. Not even sure if we can get the cans anymore. Used to but I think they replaced them all with various plastic containers.
You have to really look around here to find tomato paste in anything but a can. A store brand can would cost $0.99, whereas a tube would cost $6-7. It's alot cheaper just throwing the rest of the can out.

Like Uncle Bob, I use about a tablespoon at a time. I make little pouches with Press n Seal wrap, then cut the corner like a pastry bag when I need some. I've also heard of freezing it in ice trays.
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Old 11-30-2007, 08:56 AM   #17
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This is my preferred brand for tomato paste and its range of paste:
Leggo's Authentico
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Old 11-30-2007, 01:50 PM   #18
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I don't like storing anything in it's original container especially canned foods. Buying the tubes of paste is very expensive for the little you get.

If you have tomato paste leftover, lay it on a piece of waxed paper in 1 Tbsp. dollops. Freeze uncovered for about 4 hours, then put the dollops in a ziploc bag in the freezer. Push as much air out of the bag first. When you need a little tomato paste, you just take out a frozen tablespoon's worth (or however much you need ) and keep the rest frozen. It stays fresh in your freezer for a long time. And the little baggie takes up far less room in the freezer.

This is what I do with compound butters.
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Old 12-01-2007, 12:15 AM   #19
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without reading the responses, this is what I do. If it's a repeat, I'm sorry.

for instance if I need some tomato paste, like 2 T. I open can, take the amount out, then it's time for my Seal a Meal to appear. I use the tiny little bag things, the smallest ones, and I put 2 T amounts in each one and seal it up, then freeze. If I'm out of the little tiny baggie thingies, I use a bigger one and just heat and seal the side that it's in, then move on down to the rest of the bag and put the amount in there, and seal that up. Using one baggie for two or more tiny batches is my way of keeping the rest of the can going in to the trash. You can also use ice cube trays, put the amount in each one until your can is empty, and freeze that way, then transfer to zipper bags. This will sound really nuts. My DD feeds my DGD who's 2, meals/foods in little tiny tupperware type containers complete with locking lids. When I resently had her for a few meals, I saw that those little containers got eaten then dumped in the trash so I started collecting them for use on things such of this. << A little pesto, a smidge of mayo, a bit of tomato paste, perfect size for the freezer and it only holds about 3 T tops.
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Old 12-05-2007, 05:28 AM   #20
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I, too, just spoon tomato paste into a baggie and toss it into the freezer. The tubes are way way too expensive. Once you've frozen it, you can break off a piece of the right size.
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