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Old 03-17-2018, 10:50 PM   #1
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Beef stock (broth?) is the wrong color

Beef soup bones were on sale today at the supermarket, so I decided Id make some beef broth. I roasted the bones (about 2 lbs) for a couple of hours in a low oven, then added them to the stockpot with a quartered onion, two celery stalks, and a bunch of mushroom stems (I didnt have any carrots, for some reason).

The broth never turns that beautiful golden color that characterizes the base of a French onion soup. Its whitish and milky. There was virtually no scum to skim as I brought it to a boil, and I skimmed some fat about an hour in.

Can anyone tell me why this is, and how to make a beef broth with good color?

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Old 03-18-2018, 04:50 AM   #2
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Did you leave the skin on the onion and did it have dark skin? I usually use bones that have a little meat left on. After roasting the meat will also add color and flavor.
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Old 03-18-2018, 08:12 AM   #3
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How does it taste? When you say "whitish", is it like the color of chicken broth. "Milky" doesn't sound particularly appetizing. Maybe you used too much water making the stock?, otherwise I don't know.

One way to rescue the stock/ make it browner is to use a little browning sauce. Kitchen Bouquet and HP are two common brands. They're both made from vegetables. I would be careful using too much so your stock doesn't come out looking like artificial gravy that some restaurants use to spiiff up and then it looks fake.

I think one way to use it as is, is to make sopa de cebolla, Mexican onion soup. This is usually cooked either as a vegetarian soup or with chicken broth. I think it would great with your current stock situation.
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Old 03-18-2018, 11:27 AM   #4
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This is why I buy it already made. Too much work, for too little return.
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Old 03-18-2018, 11:41 AM   #5
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I make chicken broth almost every time I make chicken, then I freeze it. I have a gallon or so frozen in pint and quart jars. When the freezer gets too full, I boil the broth down until it is super concentrated to save on space.

Anyways, here is a possible answer to the whitish broth versus the more golden colored broth.
https://www.koreanbapsang.com/2013/0...bone-soup.html
Quote:
In making a Western-style beef stock or Vietnamese pho broth, the cooks aim for a clear, brown broth by simmering beef bones for many hours. In contrast, the goal of making seolleongtang is to achieve a milky white broth. Whats done differently? Its the heat level! For a clear broth, the bones are gently simmered over low heat. Simmering, by definition, is cooking at the temperature below the boiling point with bubbles gently rising to the top. For a milky broth, you need to boil moderately, not simmer, throughout the cooking time.
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Old 03-18-2018, 12:17 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
I make chicken broth almost every time I make chicken, then I freeze it. I have a gallon or so frozen in pint and quart jars. When the freezer gets too full, I boil the broth down until it is super concentrated to save on space.

Anyways, here is a possible answer to the whitish broth versus the more golden colored broth.
https://www.koreanbapsang.com/2013/0...bone-soup.html
Hah! That article nailed it! I cooked the broth with too much heat! Thank you!
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Old 03-18-2018, 12:34 PM   #7
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You're welcome.
Though I've never made pho, I always thought it would be such a nice dish to make. And to nail pho, it needs a clear broth and just the right spices and herbs, and well, I haven't made it.
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Old 03-18-2018, 12:36 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJoel View Post
Hah! That article nailed it! I cooked the broth with too much heat! Thank you!
Interesting. I've never made beef stock, only chicken stock, and I make it in a pressure cooker. At sea level it cooks at 250 F. The cookbooks have no mention of beef stock turning white if you make it in a pressure cooker.
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Old 03-18-2018, 12:46 PM   #9
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tenspeed, the pressure cooker drives the boiling point up, so it never boils, it remains still.

Quote:
Another cool feature: By raising the boiling point, you can be sure that the liquid in your pressure cooker won't boil, even though its contents will be well over 212F (unless you allow it to over-pressurize, in which case the cooker will vent itself and boiling will occur). This stillness inside the cooker means you'll end up with a clear stock, free of the proteins and other gunk that can turn it cloudy once dispersed.
from: https://www.seriouseats.com/2017/04/...ken-stock.html
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Old 03-18-2018, 12:59 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by blissful View Post
tenspeed, the pressure cooker drives the boiling point up, so it never boils, it remains still.



from: https://www.seriouseats.com/2017/04/...ken-stock.html
That's good to know. I would have thought it would be a function of temperature, but it's the agitation of boiling. I learned something today, so it was worth getting out of bed.


Note to self: Never quick release when making stock.
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