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Old 10-31-2015, 01:36 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
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I made chicken broth just last week, while preparing my chicken enchilada casserole, from chicken breasts, water, salt and a couple of bay leaves. I used the chicken in the casserole, discarded the bay leaves and froze the broth.

I also have several quarts of chicken stock in my freezer. I made them with water, chicken carcasses (with a little meat hanging on), carrots, onion, celery, garlic, parsley, thyme, bay leaves and black peppercorns. Sometimes I make it with roasted chicken parts, like RP.

They can be used interchangeably, but stock has more body from the collagen in the connective tissue and flavor from the extra ingredients.
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Old 10-31-2015, 01:37 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Really? I assume chicken carcass means bones with some meat clinging to the bones.
So do I.
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Old 10-31-2015, 01:56 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
It turns out great, but it's not broth. It's stock. They're not the same thing.
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So do I.
D'oh! Sorry about that. I misread that and thought you were saying it the other way around.
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Old 10-31-2015, 02:09 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
D'oh! Sorry about that. I misread that and thought you were saying it the other way around.
No biggie
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Old 10-31-2015, 10:57 PM   #15
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If bones are in the pot its stock.

If there are no bones and just meat it's broth.
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Old 10-31-2015, 11:58 PM   #16
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If bones are in the pot its stock.

If there are no bones and just meat it's broth.
That's how I've always figured it.
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Old 11-01-2015, 01:39 AM   #17
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My take on stock and broth comes from teh words used to label each. Stock is the basic flavored liquid made from bones and meat. It is used to stock the shelves with a product that can be used for many recipes. it it is usually made from roasted or leftover bones that still have meat, connecting tissue, and cartilage on them. The bones are often fractured or broken to expose the bone marrow to the braising process. The marrow, fat, connecting tissue, and any gristle or cartilage breaks down into a liquid and adds flavor, nutritional value, and texture to the stock. The meat helps flavor it. The only seasoning in a stock is usually salt. The stock can be used to make anything from demi glace to beef 7 barley soup.

Broth is a stock that has been fortified with the flavors of vegetables, usualy at least carrot, celery, and onion. Herbs and spices can also be added to obtain the desired flavor you want. Broths are often part of soup recipes, and can also be used to make gravies, or combined with a roux to make an espanole sauce. You could state that a broth is a daughter sauce of a good stock.

In poultry, and some other meats, the skin will add flavor and collagen to the stock. Stocks can often be started from pan drippings, as from a roasted chicken or turkey, or pot roast. You can even use the fond from a pan of fried mead, as long as there isn't too much fat.

If the stock is made from fish, it is called a fume'.

Hope that helps.

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Old 11-01-2015, 01:25 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
My take on stock and broth comes from teh words used to label each. Stock is the basic flavored liquid made from bones and meat. It is used to stock the shelves with a product that can be used for many recipes. it it is usually made from roasted or leftover bones that still have meat, connecting tissue, and cartilage on them. The bones are often fractured or broken to expose the bone marrow to the braising process. The marrow, fat, connecting tissue, and any gristle or cartilage breaks down into a liquid and adds flavor, nutritional value, and texture to the stock. The meat helps flavor it. The only seasoning in a stock is usually salt. The stock can be used to make anything from demi glace to beef 7 barley soup.

Broth is a stock that has been fortified with the flavors of vegetables, usualy at least carrot, celery, and onion. Herbs and spices can also be added to obtain the desired flavor you want. Broths are often part of soup recipes, and can also be used to make gravies, or combined with a roux to make an espanole sauce. You could state that a broth is a daughter sauce of a good stock.

In poultry, and some other meats, the skin will add flavor and collagen to the stock. Stocks can often be started from pan drippings, as from a roasted chicken or turkey, or pot roast. You can even use the fond from a pan of fried mead, as long as there isn't too much fat.

If the stock is made from fish, it is called a fume'.

Hope that helps.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
We learned to make stock in cooking school and mire poix plus bouquet garni was an essential part of the process. When made with just meat and meat byproducts, it has little flavor (and what flavor is there is rather funky) and is no stock that I'd find much use for.
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Old 11-02-2015, 07:24 AM   #19
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Soup from boneless chicken? And I'm sure it is white meat. Reminds of old soldiers joke about soup made from an ax.


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Old 11-02-2015, 09:12 AM   #20
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I agree the term broth and stock are generally interchangeable. It depends on what the final result is intended for and what ingredients/herbs etc are added or not to the pot.
Anyway.
I never use carrots. I take the advice of Thomas Keller (French Laundry). He writes that carrots are "flavor sponges" which absorb a lot of flavor. Especially in delicate flavored broths/stocks. When the carrots are discarded a lot of flavor is ending up in the garbage.
I wouldn't bother attempting to use chicken breasts to make a broth/stock.
Especially chicken breasts from the supermarket.
These are obviously only my opinions......and Thomas Keller's.
Each broth/stock to their own. LOL
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