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Old 04-08-2007, 05:15 PM   #1
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Do You Flour The Meat?

I often see people on cooking shows lightly flour the meat before browning it for a casserole but is that really necessary? Is it to help thicken the sauce? I haven't been doing that but maybe I should. What do you do?

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Old 04-08-2007, 05:44 PM   #2
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Yes, a lot of times I do. But usually the directions call for it. More often it's for pork chops, roast, beef tips, etc. Sometimes for one-pot meals this is called for. It helps flavor the dish and yes, it can help promote a thicker gravy. If you have a specific casserole in mind give us a general recipe and we'll tell you whether that's one we brown the protein/meat for.
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Old 04-08-2007, 06:22 PM   #3
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Flouring the meat first does help thicken the sauce. I've never done it for a casserole, though...just pot roast and stews.
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Old 04-08-2007, 06:22 PM   #4
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Flouring helps the meat to brown and can aid in thickening a sauce or gravy. Flouring is usually done for stews and soups or other dsishes that include the meat's being cooked in a liquid.
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Old 04-09-2007, 04:27 AM   #5
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What's the difference between a casserole and a stew? I thought it was a different term for the same thing.
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Old 04-09-2007, 08:22 AM   #6
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Stews have more liquid than cassaroles.

Cassaroles are usually done in the oven while stews are usually done on the stovetop.

Cassaroles are baked in a low, wide, open top baking dish (sometimes the top is covered for part of the cooking time) while stews are cooked in closed pots.

Cassaroles are cooked in cassarole dishes.
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Old 04-09-2007, 10:57 AM   #7
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I don't flour because I think it makes the meat slimy. I brown the meat and if the sauce needs thickening I add some Wondra or regular flour.

IMO flour doesn't help the meat to brown.
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Old 04-09-2007, 11:28 AM   #8
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I always dredge the meat in seasoned flour. It's for creating the roux.
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Old 04-09-2007, 11:55 AM   #9
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I'll try it with flour and see if it makes much difference.

Thanks for your responses.
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Old 04-09-2007, 12:02 PM   #10
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I always use flour to dust my beef or pork before browning, I can sure tell the difference. Can't beat the little bits on the bottom of the pan for gravy or sauce, w/ a little onion and garlic for flavor. Let us now when you try it Topaz !
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Old 04-09-2007, 12:31 PM   #11
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Yep, I flour my meat. To be honest I enjoy that part of cooking a stew or similar, because its the hands on part of a hands off type cooking process! Itr does make a better "juice" for the dish.
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Old 04-09-2007, 02:22 PM   #12
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I always use flour. Maybe it's just a habit, but I do it without even thinking. I also think it helps to thicken the sauce slightly.
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Old 01-03-2008, 09:44 AM   #13
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I don't flour the meat, for two reasons:
1. I prefer the taste of browned meat, not browned flour. With floured meat you get both, but without the flour you get just the taste of browned meat.
2. Most of my stews or casseroles are thickened with blond or tan roux, so I don't need the flour at the beginning.

This is strictly a personal preference, I am not suggesting my way is "better".
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Old 01-03-2008, 10:06 AM   #14
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Thickening is the answer.

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Old 01-03-2008, 10:09 AM   #15
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One thing you may want to try if you don't like to flour the meat is this: Julienne some bacon and brown it off in your pan first. Add some flour and cook out a roux. Then you can add your meat and proceed as usual for your stew.

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Old 01-03-2008, 10:52 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VeraBlue View Post
I always dredge the meat in seasoned flour. It's for creating the roux.
Ditto.
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Old 01-03-2008, 11:47 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ErikC View Post
I don't flour the meat, for two reasons:
1. I prefer the taste of browned meat, not browned flour. With floured meat you get both, but without the flour you get just the taste of browned meat.
2. Most of my stews or casseroles are thickened with blond or tan roux, so I don't need the flour at the beginning.

This is strictly a personal preference, I am not suggesting my way is "better".
Agree. I never use flour for stews or soups. The fond that develops on the pan bottom can contain a lot of darkened or burned flour, and doesn't develop the flavor of just browned meat. Flour will burn at a lower temp than meat.

When the liquid is added and you effectively deglase the pan, I don't want a lot of cooked flour taking away from the flavor.

Just the way I always saw it done at home. Not better or "right".
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Old 01-03-2008, 01:09 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mozart View Post
Agree. I never use flour for stews or soups. The fond that develops on the pan bottom can contain a lot of darkened or burned flour, and doesn't develop the flavor of just browned meat. Flour will burn at a lower temp than meat.

When the liquid is added and you effectively deglase the pan, I don't want a lot of cooked flour taking away from the flavor.

Just the way I always saw it done at home. Not better or "right".

I'm with Eric and Mozart.
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Old 01-03-2008, 01:32 PM   #19
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I'm with the flouring camp. I think the finished product tastes better with the browned floured meat.
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Old 01-03-2008, 02:46 PM   #20
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I add the flour towards the end of browning the meat.
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