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Old 08-31-2007, 06:56 PM   #11
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I dont use celery leaves as I believe they are bitter but I think its a personal preference.I think it depends on which one of your four taste buds is dominant.So you got sweet,sour,salty and bitter mine is the bitter I can taste it where others cannot other people cant handle sour which I can I love saurkraut,pickles and so on.
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Old 09-01-2007, 08:49 PM   #12
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celery tops, onion peels, carrot peels & ends, and perhaps tomato & mushroom trimmings are the basic ingredients to store up in your freezer for soup stock.

but use your own discretion. if in doubt, taste. if the celery was bitter, using them would make the stock bitter also. other veggie trimmings wouldn't normally be used for most stocks; for example, cabbage trimmings from near the stalk can be peppery tasting, eggplant peels would give an unwanted color, etc. at other times, you might want these, depending on what you were going to make.
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Old 09-02-2007, 10:28 AM   #13
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I raise my own celery. I do not fool with blanching the plants. I harvest from the center of the plant, usually have 12 plants. I harvest the outer leaves for the goats (pre-marinateing?).. I also dry excess leaves for winter soups. My bitter taste buds don't work particualry well, celery nor green peppers do not taste bitter to me. The inner, lighter colored celery leaves should not be bitter. I would definitley use them in some manner.
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Old 09-02-2007, 10:57 AM   #14
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Reading through the other posts, it seems like a lot of people use their stock pot almost like their garbage pot. I always peel my carrots, always use fresh, skinned onions, and always scrub my celery before it goes it. Potato/mushroom/carrot peels? No thanks! Somebody said once about putting peels in your stock "Would you eat it on a salad? If no , then why put it in your stock?"

That said, I do think the leaves add a good amount of flavor, and once cleaned, I always toss them in.
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Old 09-02-2007, 11:21 AM   #15
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I completely disagree with that!! Garbage pot indeed!! Where the heck have you been - obviously not up on veggie nutrition.

I can see not wanting to use the skins of old, tired, commercially produced vegetables; but organically grown purchased produce along with what I grow in my own garden has quite a bit of the nutrition IN & just beneath the skin. There's absolutely NOTHING wrong or garbage-like in using it for stock. Good grief!!

In fact, I rarely if ever peel my organic/home-grown carrots, potatoes, etc. - for any recipe. What a waste. And there's also absolutely nothing wrong with using mushroom stems - regardless of type. While they may be too tough to use in a recipe, they can impart fabulous mushroom flavor to a stock. Again - garbage indeed!!

I suppose you also disagree with using lobster & shrimp shells, meat & fish bones & poultry carcasses for stock. Where exactly do you think these stocks come from??

If you want to waste food, go to it - but don't tell the rest of us that we're making our stock out of garbage. Shame on you!
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Old 09-02-2007, 11:41 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by college_cook View Post
Somebody said once about putting peels in your stock "Would you eat it on a salad? If no , then why put it in your stock?"
The simple answer is flavor and color. Clean peels are a great thing to use for stock. The are loaded with nutrients and flavor and also lend color to the finished product.

This person that said the quote above, do they make chicken stock? Would they put chicken bones in their salad or ever eat chicken bones? If not then by their logic they would not use chicken bones in their stock either.

Those scraps and peels are only garbage because that is what you do with them. If you have a good use for them then they are not garbage, but viable parts of produce.
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Old 09-02-2007, 01:34 PM   #17
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This is great stuff, thanks everyone! Does anyone know of a good book that covers this "home ec" part of cooking? I'd love a book that shows you how to stretch your food dollars (in other words, how to turn parts of food that I've been considering "garbage" and throwing out into other dishes)?

I asked this question the day after making a veggie stock. At that point, I had thrown out probably 8 or 9 mushrooms (because they'd gotten a little old), some celery (which had gotten soft), and some other veggies that in hindsight could have still been used...
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Old 09-02-2007, 01:46 PM   #18
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Uh, QuickerThinkerUpper - you're completely missing the point here.

No one is saying that you should use old/stale/spoiled vegetables or other foods normally thought of as garbage in other dishes. Read for comprehension - no one here has said that at all, & hopefully there is no "good book" out there advising you how to do so. The only thing that sort of stuff is good for is turning into compost.

If you go back & read the posts here you'll see that what we're advocating is using the peels & scraps from BRIGHT, FRESH vegetables to make stock. Period.
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Old 09-02-2007, 02:34 PM   #19
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I disagree Breezy. I think those things that Quick Thinker Upper is talking about most certainly can be used. Will it make the best tasting broth you have ever had? No. Is it better than just throwing away some celery that is a little past it's prime? absolutely.
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Old 09-02-2007, 04:41 PM   #20
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Thanks GB, that is exactly my point. And Breezy, I see your point and would never use really garbage-bound veggies to cook with. But those mushrooms I threw out the other day weren't fresh enough to eat raw in a salad so I threw them out. I'm sure their flavor was still fine though, but I didn't think to use them in a broth, where their texture wouldn't matter as much. Also, the idea of using veggie trimmings (from fresh veggies as you said) is new to me. I've bought veggies specifically for the purposes of making broth. Maybe I would have saved a couple of bucks here and there by using trimmings instead....I never knew you could do that. That's the kind of information I'd be looking for in a book.

Also, my post did say "how to turn parts of food that I've been considering 'garbage'"... like the leaves from celery, the bones from chicken, the peeled skins from carrots, etc.
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