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Old 02-11-2011, 10:29 AM   #11
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You can also use it, fresh or dried, as an acid/base indicator. Turmeric turns red at about pH 8.4. Dissolve some in alcohol, soak some coffee filters in the solution, let them dry, fashion into a rose and spritz with ammonia (or the base of your choice). You'll be painting the roses red.

Very cool!

You know I'm gonna do this ....
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Old 02-15-2011, 10:21 AM   #12
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May be it is especial kind of dish but we generally do not add coconut and tomato in same dish, the taste will not blend well.
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Old 02-15-2011, 07:26 PM   #13
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Interesting, Radhuni. I have used this recipe several times and enjoyed it. Maybe I'll try it with some green beans instead of tomato next time - or would you suggest a different veg?
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Old 02-16-2011, 01:32 AM   #14
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Interesting, Radhuni. I have used this recipe several times and enjoyed it. Maybe I'll try it with some green beans instead of tomato next time - or would you suggest a different veg?
green peas.
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Old 02-16-2011, 01:43 AM   #15
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mmmmmmmmmutter paneer!
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:20 AM   #16
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Interesting, Radhuni. I have used this recipe several times and enjoyed it. Maybe I'll try it with some green beans instead of tomato next time - or would you suggest a different veg?
Taste is relative, may be your liking are different from us.

Tomato is relatively a new vegetable in India (may be that's why we don't have any proper Indian name tomato) where as coconut is native to India, so naturally we don't use tomato with coconut in traditional dishes.
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:29 AM   #17
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In every cuisine there is the traditional way of doing things and then the not so tradiitional.

The recipe you posted is not really authentic - tomatoes, shredded coconut (we use it as garnish on our dishes, not in cooking, it's mostly fresh coconut that we ground into a paste or coconut milk), vinegar in the same dish is something you will never find in Indian cooking, not South, not North, not East or West but then again that's the fun of experimenting.

Your recipe may not be authentic but it sounds like it can work, the only thing I disagree with is skipping pre-toasting the spices. I think it's absolutely a must for Indian cooking if you want the depth of flavor.
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:32 AM   #18
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...the only thing I disagree with is skipping pre-toasting the spices. I think it's absolutely a must for Indian cooking if you want the depth of flavor.
I preroast the spices, but I usually don't the "sweet spices", mainly because I have never figured out how to effectively toast a cinnamon stick, LOL.
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:36 AM   #19
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You break the cinnamon stick with your hands into small peices, add it to the other whole spices and toast it in a dry skillet. You then grind it in a coffee grinder and it is perfectly powdered. You can't just zap it once and expect cinnamon to be powdered, you go at it a few times.
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:41 AM   #20
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Thanks, Yakuta! My Mr Coffee coffee grinder and I are good friends in the spice world, but I hadn't tried breaking up the stick into small pieces before toasting.
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Dry Coconut Curry After all the curry chat yesterday, I was ready for some spice. I "think" I am supposed to post recipes here, and then put a link to "here" in the general discussion thread from yesterday. Forgive me if I am wrong about that. This is a South Indian curry, that is supposed to serve 4, but around here it serves 2, with just enough left for someone's breakfast the next day. Dry roast: 1 t black peppercorns 1 t coriander seeds 1 t cumin seeds Add 1 t fenugreek 1 t whole cloves and grind all into a powder. I generally don't roast most of the "sweet spices" because I can't perceive an improvement iin flavor from doing it, but you can is that is easier. In a minichopper or blender combine the spice powder with 1/2 t turmeric 2 fresh chilis stemmed and seeded, serrano usually, but be flexible. 6 cloves of garlic, peeled and grind to a paste. Set your curry paste aside. Wilt 6 largish onions, sliced thin, in a skillet with about 2 T vegetable oil. In about a minute (once the are soft enough to be easily manipulated in the skillet) add a pound of cubed meat. I like pork best; chicken is good too. Saute a few minutes to get a nice finish on the outside of the cubes, then mix in half of the curry paste you made and saute about until the meat is almost done. Dividing the paste gives "a more" and "a less" cooked depth to the flavor. Add the rest of the paste, along with 2 C chopped tomatoes 2 C shredded plain coconut (not the sweetened kind you use for baking!) Simmer/fry about 3 minutes, then finish with 1/2 ground cardamon pinch ground nutmeg 1 t vinegar salt to taste. Great with flat breads or rice. 3 stars 1 reviews
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