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Old 12-03-2019, 05:43 PM   #1
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Question Freezer burned meat or bones for stock?

Is there any downside to using freezer burned meat or bones when making stock? Does it leave funny flavours? Are there other gotchas?

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Old 12-03-2019, 05:58 PM   #2
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I think it depends on how extensive the damage is. If it's just a small area, I'd trim it off and use the rest. It's not spoiled - it's just dried out.
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Old 12-03-2019, 07:56 PM   #3
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Freezer burned meats do have an off taste. For example, as teenagers, my best freind and I decided to get into our little boat, cross the river (big river, 35 foot deep and more, and 3/4 miles wide) and make a makeshift camp for the weekend on one of the little uninhabited islands. We made our camp and built a cooking fire to roast a chicken over it that we'd pulled from my parents, chest freezer. We made a spit out of willow branches and two forked branches to hold the spit. We roasted it carefully, and seasoned it with S&P. The bird had been freezer burned.

One bite and we gave the rest to my buddy's dog. The meat was not spoiled. It tasted bad and the dog would't even eat it. We had spuds, a knife and some bacon fat we'd brought along. The cast iron pan we'd brought did the trick and we had American fries for our dinner.

If the food is badly freezer burned, I would chuck it into the woods and let the wildlife have it. That- my opinion, based on past experieces with freezer burned chiken, and rabbit.

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Old 12-03-2019, 10:44 PM   #4
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I agree, freezer burned, just toss it. Not only is a big chunk of it dried out/burnt it has taken on the taste of the freezer/refrigerator over that time. Not worth it.

That being said I do wrap up small meat leftovers and throw them in the freezer and use them for chili or something similar. Try not to let them go more than a week or so.
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Old 12-04-2019, 12:00 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by strmanglr scott View Post
I agree, freezer burned, just toss it. Not only is a big chunk of it dried out/burnt it has taken on the taste of the freezer/refrigerator over that time. Not worth it. .

I agree with this and Chief.

Freezer burned meat has a distinct "off" taste to me.
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Old 12-04-2019, 08:57 PM   #6
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Your story gave me a much need grin Chief..thank you.


Unless the freezer burn can be removed I'd chuck it too, but we don't have any woods in these parts, and no dog either.
I'd certainly eat it if I had to, but not by choice.
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Old 12-05-2019, 08:31 PM   #7
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Thanks for all the replies. It makes sense that if air got into the package to freezer burn the meat, that freezer smells would get in too.
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Old 12-13-2019, 10:18 AM   #8
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If it’s super bad pitch it, little spots pick out of hamburger etc. Growing up we often had stuff with freezer burn obviously it’s not as prime as fresh. But try extra broth or a can of tomatoes, etc while it cooks and do it lower and slower hot and fast won’t help. Go heavy handed with onion, garlic, herbs even a jalapeño or something. Even marinate it if you want. Get your flavour package and bouquet to be pronounced help it out it’s limping give it a boost.

If you just grill or cook it your going to notice it more but put in the effort it comes back to you. Use it in a chilli or something it’s not the end of the world.

If it’s chicken same thing you can even boil it in broth and do a nice mushroom sauce or something but just give it a hand
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Old 12-14-2019, 08:16 AM   #9
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I have had great success using freezer burned chicken to make soup and stock. Usually only the skin is freezer burned so I remove that and the rest is good.
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Old 12-14-2019, 09:21 AM   #10
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Interesting, to me, is that since I started vacuum packing freezer items about 20 years ago, I've not had any freezer burned meat or anything else..

I swear by vacuum packing..

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Old 12-15-2019, 02:05 AM   #11
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Vacuum packing removes the air from the food. It doesn't have the chance to out, and oxidize. This keeps the food fresh, and prevents foul flavors as hydrogen and oxygen can't react with the fats, and other food substances. It also keeps the food from absorbing odors from your freezer. Vacuum packing definitely helps, if you get all of the air out, and a good seal.

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Old 12-17-2019, 07:47 AM   #12
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I changed processors for my beef and pork. They vac seal. But my poultry processor does not. This year I repackaged and vac sealed everything myself. I swear by it.
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