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Old 01-03-2015, 03:25 PM   #1
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How long do you cook your stock?

I've been making a lot of stocks/broths. I don't always make soup. I use it like someone would have a glass of water during the day. I also use it for soups, stews, and general cooking. Sometimes it's just using cut up chicken parts and other times it the carcass and left over chicken/turkey from roasting.

How long do you guys usually simmer your stock for? I tend to not have the patients to do it for much longer then 12 hours tops. I have on occasion done 24 hours.

I have read many references to it being better for you the longer it simmers. Especially when bones are involved. Does anyone else spend a lot of time simmering there stock/broth on the stove?

Just curious to what other people do.

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Old 01-03-2015, 04:04 PM   #2
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I guess it depends on how much I'm making but probably 4-5 hours, tops. Roasting the ingredients first adds a great depth of flavor that, imo, obviates the need to simmer it for so long. Note: I almost always make poultry stock, rather than beef, and it needs less cooking time. Still, I'm not running a restaurant here This works for me.
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Old 01-03-2015, 04:41 PM   #3
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Most of the time I cook stock for an hour and a half. If I make boiled beef or a pot-au-feu I let it cook up to 4 hours. I always add a glug of vinegar to the pot when I make stock. I was told the vinegar helps release calcium and collagen. I also cook my stock on very low heat, you only see a bubble every now and then.

After reading an article about the Great Depression I tried an experiment. I strained the solids from a batch of stock and recooked them in fresh water. The second stock did not have any flavor or life to it. Since then I have not had any qualms about the short cooking time.

I'm probably doing it wrong, but my way works for me!
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Old 01-03-2015, 04:47 PM   #4
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I heard that the collagen isn't always extracted as much as it could from the bones if not simmered for at least 24 hours. As I mentioned in my earlier post, there is just something about over 12 hours that make me feel impatient. which sort of changes it from regular broth to bone broth.
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Old 01-03-2015, 04:58 PM   #5
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Whether or not I roast the bones for my stock, I still simmer it for several hours. Once that's done and I've removed all the solids, I let it gently simmer, uncovered, until it's reduced by about 30%.
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Old 01-03-2015, 05:03 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by legend_018 View Post
I heard that the collagen isn't always extracted as much as it could from the bones if not simmered for at least 24 hours.
That's not what I heard in culinary school.

I believe "bone broth" is just another word for stock or broth, depending on the recipe (some include mirepoix and bouquet garni, some don't). It's the newest food fad. If you're simmering your stock for 12 hours, that's way more than enough to get good nutritional value out of it.
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Old 01-03-2015, 05:30 PM   #7
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I simmer chicken/turkey bones/parts for 6 hours. Some of the bones are roasted some are not. I add mire poix veggies and other seasonings. With 6 hours of simmering I get a rich stock loaded with collagen. It has the consistency of Jell-O out of the fridge. Any longer is a waste of energy in my opinion.

Beef stock is a different story. Because of the thickness/density of beef bones, they need a lot longer simmering.
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Old 01-03-2015, 05:36 PM   #8
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Old 01-04-2015, 10:27 AM   #9
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Ive only made chicken stock. I dont have a set time. I just cook it until its done. 6 hours I suppose from start to finish. Sometimes 5 sometimes 8. Just when ever I think its done. Then I can it in a pressure canner.
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Old 01-04-2015, 11:17 AM   #10
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You could probably use a pressure cooker for stock and get 12 hour results in a lot less time.
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