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Old 10-04-2014, 07:13 PM   #1
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Umami Soup

I was visiting my eldest son in Denver last week. DDIL picked us up at the airport. The first words out of her mouth (almost) were, "Can you make us some egg rolls?" Both her and my son love my egg roll recipe. After a few more minutes, we went to meet my son on his university campus. He was done with school for the day and he suggested that we go to one of his favorite restaurants, called Sweet Tomato. It was a large, very nicely appointed salad bar with a soup bar and a small desert bar. The place was great.

My son suggest I try one of the soups, a savory broth that he put raw mushrooms from the salad bar in. I tasted it, and it was a very pleasant, warm flavored soup. I was up there with the best I'd ever made. I watched him enjoying his soup and decided to analyse it so that I could recreate it at his home and give him the recipe. After rolling it around in my mouth for a bit without any additions, I tasted mushroom broth, sauce, a bit of soy sauce, and a touch of ginger.

I successfully made the soup (to go with the egg rolls of course). I gave him the recipe. In my Soups, Stew, And Chowders cookbook, I would call this an essence soup. But It's not in that cookbook as I've just learned how to make it. Now I share it with you, and it's so simple and tasty.

Ingredients:
3 cups water
2 tbs. cooking oil
3 tbs. soy sauce
1/8 tsp. (1/2 of a 1/4 tsp) ground ginger
8 0z fresh protabela mushrooms
1/4 tsp. salt

Heat oil in a sauce pan. Add the sliced mushrooms and salt. Saute over medium-high heat until half cooked. Add the remaining ingredients. Cook until the mushrooms are cooked through. Remove the mushrooms and use in another meal. They are still delicious and have great texture. Serve the broth hot, as an appetizer. Or you can use it as a soup base to which you can add strips of uncooked beef or pork, as at a pho restaurant. Add green onion, or sliced mushroom, whatever you want. The beauty of this broth is that it's like a mother sauce for soups. Once made, you can make a hundred small soups, if I can use similar terminology to mother sauces.

Try this and see if you don't enjoy it as much as me and my son.

May your hot things be hot, your cold things be cold, and your cheddar be a room temperature.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

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Old 10-04-2014, 07:54 PM   #2
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Thanks, Chief! Have tried to duplicate for awhile.
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Old 10-04-2014, 09:10 PM   #3
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Thanks, Chief. C&Ped.

I just happen to have a brand new container of baby bellas that I can use! Originally I'd planned just to cook them in garlic butter as usual, but this sounds so good and I have the ingredients.
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Old 10-04-2014, 09:20 PM   #4
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I just picked a bunch of fresh Shitake's off my mushroom log, and was wondering what to do with them. Looks like I'll be enjoying them in the soup tomorrow.
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Old 10-05-2014, 07:25 AM   #5
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Sweet Tomato, I went to the local one once.
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Old 10-23-2014, 12:33 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I was visiting my eldest son in Denver last week. DDIL picked us up at the airport. The first words out of her mouth (almost) were, "Can you make us some egg rolls?" Both her and my son love my egg roll recipe. After a few more minutes, we went to meet my son on his university campus. He was done with school for the day and he suggested that we go to one of his favorite restaurants, called Sweet Tomato. It was a large, very nicely appointed salad bar with a soup bar and a small desert bar. The place was great.

My son suggest I try one of the soups, a savory broth that he put raw mushrooms from the salad bar in. I tasted it, and it was a very pleasant, warm flavored soup. I was up there with the best I'd ever made. I watched him enjoying his soup and decided to analyse it so that I could recreate it at his home and give him the recipe. After rolling it around in my mouth for a bit without any additions, I tasted mushroom broth, sauce, a bit of soy sauce, and a touch of ginger.

I successfully made the soup (to go with the egg rolls of course). I gave him the recipe. In my Soups, Stew, And Chowders cookbook, I would call this an essence soup. But It's not in that cookbook as I've just learned how to make it. Now I share it with you, and it's so simple and tasty.

Ingredients:
3 cups water
2 tbs. cooking oil
3 tbs. soy sauce
1/8 tsp. (1/2 of a 1/4 tsp) ground ginger
8 0z fresh protabela mushrooms
1/4 tsp. salt

Heat oil in a sauce pan. Add the sliced mushrooms and salt. Saute over medium-high heat until half cooked. Add the remaining ingredients. Cook until the mushrooms are cooked through. Remove the mushrooms and use in another meal. They are still delicious and have great texture. Serve the broth hot, as an appetizer. Or you can use it as a soup base to which you can add strips of uncooked beef or pork, as at a pho restaurant. Add green onion, or sliced mushroom, whatever you want. The beauty of this broth is that it's like a mother sauce for soups. Once made, you can make a hundred small soups, if I can use similar terminology to mother sauces.

Try this and see if you don't enjoy it as much as me and my son.

May your hot things be hot, your cold things be cold, and your cheddar be a room temperature.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
your umami soup sounds simply wonderful, chief! i received delivery of my food order today, including two humongous, saucer-sized portabello mushrooms. to go with, i have this small tray of blue grey oyster mushrooms which should be just lovely. i can't wait to get started. i'm thinking a mushroom omelet for breakfast tomorrow, and then a savory mushroom broth and grilled sammy for lunch. and the soup goes on....
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Old 10-23-2014, 12:55 AM   #7
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my mommy never made a soup like this,

looks really good, chief. copied and saved.

this sounds very asian, leaning towards japanese.

going in that direction, i might suggest that you start by making a dashi to use in place of the water, or at least a portion if it to add another level of umami.


also, i would like to suggest that you add just a touch of garlic, and maybe use some shitakes mushrooms for another level.

and finishing it with a splash of sesame oil.

just some thoughts.
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Old 10-23-2014, 06:17 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
my mommy never made a soup like this,

looks really good, chief. copied and saved.

this sounds very asian, leaning towards japanese.

going in that direction, i might suggest that you start by making a dashi to use in place of the water, or at least a portion if it to add another level of umami.


also, i would like to suggest that you add just a touch of garlic, and maybe use some shitakes mushrooms for another level.

and finishing it with a splash of sesame oil.

just some thoughts.
Sounds wonderful. It would definitely be a great soup, but no quite the same as at Sweet Tomato's. My son wanted that particular flavor. I'll be playing with flavors and so will be trying your suggestion. Thanks.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 10-23-2014, 04:05 PM   #9
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My mommy's what!?!
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Old 10-23-2014, 05:33 PM   #10
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oh my chief, this mushroom broth is a delightful, lip-smacking taste sensation--pungent and complex, with a woodsy hint of sweetness. and bee-utiful too--silky red-brown mahogony liquid! i'm serving this up in a clear glass goblet....
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portabella mushrooms, recipe, soup, soy sauce, water

Umami Soup I was visiting my eldest son in Denver last week. DDIL picked us up at the airport. The first words out of her mouth (almost) were, "Can you make us some egg rolls?" Both her and my son love my egg roll recipe. After a few more minutes, we went to meet my son on his university campus. He was done with school for the day and he suggested that we go to one of his favorite restaurants, called Sweet Tomato. It was a large, very nicely appointed salad bar with a soup bar and a small desert bar. The place was great. My son suggest I try one of the soups, a savory broth that he put raw mushrooms from the salad bar in. I tasted it, and it was a very pleasant, warm flavored soup. I was up there with the best I'd ever made. I watched him enjoying his soup and decided to analyse it so that I could recreate it at his home and give him the recipe. After rolling it around in my mouth for a bit without any additions, I tasted mushroom broth, sauce, a bit of soy sauce, and a touch of ginger. I successfully made the soup (to go with the egg rolls of course). I gave him the recipe. In my [I]Soups, Stew, And Chowders[/I] cookbook, I would call this an [I]essence soup[/I]. But It's not in that cookbook as I've just learned how to make it. Now I share it with you, and it's so simple and tasty. Ingredients: 3 cups water 2 tbs. cooking oil 3 tbs. soy sauce 1/8 tsp. (1/2 of a 1/4 tsp) ground ginger 8 0z fresh protabela mushrooms 1/4 tsp. salt Heat oil in a sauce pan. Add the sliced mushrooms and salt. Saute over medium-high heat until half cooked. Add the remaining ingredients. Cook until the mushrooms are cooked through. Remove the mushrooms and use in another meal. They are still delicious and have great texture. Serve the broth hot, as an appetizer. Or you can use it as a soup base to which you can add strips of uncooked beef or pork, as at a pho restaurant. Add green onion, or sliced mushroom, whatever you want. The beauty of this broth is that it's like a mother sauce for soups. Once made, you can make a hundred small soups, if I can use similar terminology to mother sauces. Try this and see if you don't enjoy it as much as me and my son. May your hot things be hot, your cold things be cold, and your cheddar be a room temperature. Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North 3 stars 1 reviews
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