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Old 06-30-2009, 11:23 AM   #1
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Advice for fresh Thyme?

I am writing about fresh thyme this week. Any growing tips or interesting food parings? I would like to use it with as side dish/veggie if possible.
Thank you for your help!

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Old 06-30-2009, 11:25 AM   #2
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We planted thyme years ago and it keeps coming back strong every year with no special attention on our part. Thyme is great to flavor most meats, soups, stews and pot roasts.
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Old 06-30-2009, 12:19 PM   #3
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Although this is not a side/veggie dish, it's wonderful main dish using thyme. It's easy to make and so, so, so good.

Mussels a la Carafe

4 T shallots, minced
2 TB unsalted butter
2 TB fresh thyme leaves
1 cup dry white wine
pinch pepper
4 lbs. mussels
1 cup crème fraiche
2 TB chopped parsley


Saute shallots and thyme in butter until shallots are translucent. Add the wine and pepper and bring to a simmer Add the rinsed and debearded mussels, and steam until open. (Discard any that do not open.) Remove mussels to serving dish. Add creme fraiche to the pot and bring to a boil. Cook over high heat for about 2 minutes until thickened, correct seasonings, add parsley and pour over mussels. Serve with a good baguette for sopping.

Obviously, if using other kinds of seafood/shellfish, pre-cook or add to broth as appropriate for the item.
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Old 06-30-2009, 04:48 PM   #4
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A little sprinkling of fresh thyme is a very nice addition to a grilled steak. Just had that recently for the first time and really liked it.
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Old 06-30-2009, 06:35 PM   #5
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Thyme goes well with some vegetables such as aubergine, tomatoes, zucchini or bell peppers.
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Old 07-02-2009, 09:55 AM   #6
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This is great guys! Thanks so much for your feedback. Never cooked mussels before-that is sort of intimidating...
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Old 07-02-2009, 10:03 AM   #7
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Don't be intimidated. Mussels are easy to cook. Let us know what worries you and we'll walk you through it.
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Old 07-02-2009, 01:45 PM   #8
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Agreed. Mussels couldn't be easier to cook.

At the very basic: large pot with an inch or two of water in it. Rinse/scrub mussels, discarding any that are open & don't close when you give them a tap or two. Add mussels to pot. Cover pot & cook on medium-high/high for about 10 minutes or until mussels are at least 1/2 open. Serve with melted butter.

Of course you can fancy this up - although the fanciest I ever get is to substitute white wine for the water & lob in some crushed garlic cloves, thyme, parsley, etc., into the water as well. Nice, but not necessary. Any leftover broth can be strained & saved in the freezer to add to seafood pasta sauces or soups.
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Old 07-02-2009, 03:02 PM   #9
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IF you are roasting a whole chicken, stuff the cavity with whole thyme and sage leaves, maybe a pierced lemon. If you make stock, thyme is a great ingredient. TV shows would have you tying it into a cute little bundle, etc. Well, You're going to run the stock through a sieve anyway, so why bother? Rinse it well, toss it in the pot with your bones, carrots, onions, garlic, celery, etc, then strain it all out later. The same with sage.
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