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Old 10-16-2013, 01:29 PM   #31
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I haven't tried dried chives. I have chives growing in my yard. About this time of year, I cut them all the way back. I parblanch them for a few seconds and then let them dry and freeze them. I cut off as much as I need still frozen. They are a bit limp, but work fine. So, a bit finely chopped on a baked potato, or in a sauce is just fine. In a salad, not so much.

Why don't you plant some? They love a cold climate with a really cold winter. I have some in a pot, so I will bring them in and see how they do in the house. Never tried that before. The rest stay outside.
Chives seem to like all kinds of weather. We don't always get a frost here, so my chives and usually parsley are available fresh all winter. The chives get these beautiful big lavender-colored flowers in the spring.
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Old 10-16-2013, 01:34 PM   #32
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Chives seem to like all kinds of weather. We don't always get a frost here, so my chives and usually parsley are available fresh all winter. The chives get these beautiful big lavender-colored flowers in the spring.
Interesting. One of our members who lives in SoCal has never been able to grow them. Mine come back every year, after a very cold winter. I once found some chives growing in a field that hadn't been cultivated in over 20 years.

Yup, those flowers are very pretty. They are fun to put in salads.
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Old 10-16-2013, 06:44 PM   #33
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Interesting. One of our members who lives in SoCal has never been able to grow them. Mine come back every year, after a very cold winter. I once found some chives growing in a field that hadn't been cultivated in over 20 years.

Yup, those flowers are very pretty. They are fun to put in salads.
Chives and mint are crazy hardy. One mint plant of mine is now in my garden and in 3 neighbors' yards. I have to constantly weed it out.

I grew chives in a planter from the seeds on the pretty flowers

I love chives and will bring it indoors and try to keep it alive.
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Old 10-16-2013, 06:53 PM   #34
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I have most all my mints planted in pots sunk in the ground, but still have the occasional escapee. My lemon balm is everywhere (mint relative). My chives are in a big raised bed, I throw the dried seed heads into the pine grove, and have a lot of chive children, they do really well in a cold climate.
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Old 10-16-2013, 07:05 PM   #35
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Chives and mint are crazy hardy. One mint plant of mine is now in my garden and in 3 neighbors' yards. I have to constantly weed it out.

I grew chives in a planter from the seeds on the pretty flowers

I love chives and will bring it indoors and try to keep it alive.
How well did that work, keeping them alive indoors?
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Old 10-16-2013, 09:23 PM   #36
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Interesting. One of our members who lives in SoCal has never been able to grow them.
The climate may be too dry for them there. Sometimes even extra watering doesn't help. Some plants need more humid air to thrive.
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Old 10-17-2013, 12:22 AM   #37
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................Why don't you plant some? They love a cold climate with a really cold winter. I have some in a pot, so I will bring them in and see how they do in the house. Never tried that before. The rest stay outside.
I really have no good place to put a herb garden. Our house is raised up so much in the front to try and get around our grade (our driveway is steep enough that it is now out-of-code; new homes are not built unless the driveway grade is under 10%) that we have just bushes and a tree out front. Our back door out of the add-on sunroom is a 3-foot-drop because we never could decide on the design of the new deck. We'll put a basic rectangle on in the spring, but it doesn't matter. Back and one side are heavily treed and/or shaded. Only the south side of the house gets garden-type light, but I have to walk halfway around the house to get to it. I was absolutely ruined in our first home. Colonial style, garage was forward of the facade, and a sidewalk from the drive to the front porch formed a rectangular garden about 5 X 8 right off the front porch. From the sidewalk you stepped up one level to the porch, then one outside step and boom, second step up was the threshold. *sigh* I'd sit in my porch rocker on a rainy day and smell all the herbs. Next home will have a flat yard again, and you can bet I'll be looking for that perfect "herb garden" setting.
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Old 10-17-2013, 06:16 AM   #38
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When I mow the yard there is an area where I smell mint.
I guess that means I have an herb garden somewhere
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Old 10-17-2013, 07:14 AM   #39
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I buy whole spices too and then grind them. If you have an old jar of, lets say cumin, and you grind some cumin seeds, the difference in the smell is amazing.

If I do keep things in jars (and in the dark) and there is airspace in the jar I use a scrunched up piece of cling film/saran wrap(?) to fill the gap and keep it as airtight as possible.
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Old 10-17-2013, 08:33 AM   #40
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How well did that work, keeping them alive indoors?
It's this winter's experiment.

I'm not good at indoor gardening so keep your fingers crossed !
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