"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Herbs and Spices
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-28-2013, 02:38 PM   #1
Head Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 1,062
Capsicum?

My 'puter crashed just before christmas. Am having an awkward time with the tablet.... But need to know...

I have a recipe from 'the cooking bug'. I believe it is from the UK, or someplace that uses metric and 'capsicum' (instead of 'peppers'). They also use the term tablespoon... So i don't know.

Question: they say, "1 red capsicum, fire roasted and skinned, sliced"

I have never heard of doing this with a hot pepper..... so am I correct in assuming they mean a sweet red pepper?

This recipe is for Lamb Pasties with a moorish flair.

2nd question, althoug nothing to do with herbs n spices (as said, i find it very hard to move around here in the tablet)....

I will be grinding precooked lamb, recipe calls for 500 grams lamb minced, do I still use the same weight measure for cooked?

__________________

__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2013, 02:49 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,873
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
I asked an Australian member about capsicum and in Australia they only use the term for "sweet" peppers.

How much fat came off that lamb when you cooked it? If it was a lot, then maybe you should reduce the amount of lamb you grind. OTH, I don't think having a bit too much (or a bit too little) meat would hurt the pasties.
__________________

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2013, 02:53 PM   #3
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 1,759
I'm pretty sure that it's sweet red peppers the recipes is talking about. Although one of them seems a bit much for a lb. of meat. But that's just for my tastes.

Moorish food isn't noted, ordinarily, for it's heat. Except for that wonderful and hot Harissa spice mixture. But seeing as it's a pastie, I'm going to guess that heat/spicy won't be needed.

Just let me know when I can come for dinner! I love lamb in any form----- and pasties are one of the best.

About the weights before and after. I just wouldn't worry about that.
__________________
cave76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2013, 03:14 PM   #4
Head Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 1,062
Thanks so much. Iguess I should have realized that most recipes state chilies when talking hot. You have both boosted my confidence to not worry!

I will let you know how they turn out. This recipe uses wholemeal flour OR buckwheat flour for the pastry. I am anxious to try the buckwheat.

Ummm, just reread, it does call for "wholemeal".... Meaning wholewheat?
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2013, 05:33 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,873
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
It probably means whole grain wheat in this case (whole wheat doesn't have to have the germ). It can mean any whole grain flour. I'm not sure in a British recipe. Why don't you see if any of our Brits are online and PM one who is.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2013, 10:38 AM   #6
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
My 'puter crashed just before christmas. Am having an awkward time with the tablet.... But need to know...

I have a recipe from 'the cooking bug'. I believe it is from the UK, or someplace that uses metric and 'capsicum' (instead of 'peppers'). They also use the term tablespoon... So i don't know.

Question: they say, "1 red capsicum, fire roasted and skinned, sliced"

I have never heard of doing this with a hot pepper..... so am I correct in assuming they mean a sweet red pepper?

This recipe is for Lamb Pasties with a moorish flair.

2nd question, althoug nothing to do with herbs n spices (as said, i find it very hard to move around here in the tablet)....

I will be grinding precooked lamb, recipe calls for 500 grams lamb minced, do I still use the same weight measure for cooked?
I've come across "capsicums" used generally for all kinds of peppers including chilis but not often in recipes or for food use. We just say "peppers" qualified by colour (red, green, yellow and orange with the odd purpley-black one appearing in the shops),

The only thing I can think of, given your description, is that the ones required for the recipe are the "sweet" peppers which come in a jar, ready roasted.

I wouldn't worry about the tablespoon measure. In this sort of context it shouldn't really matter whether it means UK, US or Australian tablespoons. A US tablespoon is fractionally bigger than a UK tablespoon, according to google but not enough to make much difference.
__________________
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2013, 10:57 AM   #7
Head Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 1,062
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post

I wouldn't worry about the tablespoon measure. In this sort of context it shouldn't really matter whether it means UK, US or Australian tablespoons. A US tablespoon is fractionally bigger than a UK tablespoon, according to google but not enough to make much difference.
I knew the differences between the Tbsp measures are not enough to worry about. I only mentioned to help give a clue as to the country/origins of the web site
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2013, 10:58 AM   #8
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
It probably means whole grain wheat in this case (whole wheat doesn't have to have the germ). It can mean any whole grain flour. I'm not sure in a British recipe. Why don't you see if any of our Brits are online and PM one who is.
If a UK recipe says "wholemeal" flour it means the same as whole wheat/whole grain flour and should include all of the grain. However, there are differences in quality and production methods so for a more in depth answer look here

http://www.flourbin.com/cgi-bin/pnDbDetail.cgi?data=faqs&record_id=42&mode=user&ac tion=display
__________________

__________________
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
other

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.