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Old 08-05-2008, 12:53 PM   #21
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LOL!!! I rest my case too - because it's only too obvious that you can't read for comprehension. Laughably, even your American Spice Trade Association quote supports what I've been saying - LOL!!!! (Oh - & by the way, it's "chili", not "chilli". Want to start a fight about that? Lol!!) The word "misnomer" MEANS that the American Spice Trade Association agrees that the name is being used incorrectly.

You know what? I don't give a rat's patootie what you want to call the generic mishmosh of ground peppers you're using over there in the UK. Call it whatever you want. I'll happily continue to buy & use PURE ground "Cayenne" peppers or PURE ground Jalapeno peppers, or PURE ground Chipotle (smoked Jalapenos -want to start a fight about that? Lol!!) peppers, or the ground peppers of any variety ad infinitum that I can buy or grow myself.

Your so so very sadly informed & so sadly & obviously without good pepper sources or information where you live. But that's your misfortune, luckily not mine.
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Old 08-05-2008, 01:13 PM   #22
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Both are right. It just depends on where you are.
Just like Kleenex, Xerox and other specific brand names that
have become generic as well.

Gimme a Coke doesn't always mean someone wants a Coca Cola.
Go make me a Xerox copy...
Can I have a Kleenex, please?

So some use Cayenne as a specific pepper, like the ones in my window garden.
But I have a package of ground Cayenne pepper powder that has ingredients
of "ground red pepper". And its from McCormick or Durkee, I forget which.

I submit that for 99% of the cooks in the world, the fine line of what is Cayenne
probably doesn't matter, either.
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Old 08-05-2008, 01:29 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by GrillingFool View Post
Both are right. It just depends on where you are.
Just like Kleenex, Xerox and other specific brand names that
have become generic as well.

Gimme a Coke doesn't always mean someone wants a Coca Cola.
Go make me a Xerox copy...
Can I have a Kleenex, please?

So some use Cayenne as a specific pepper, like the ones in my window garden.
But I have a package of ground Cayenne pepper powder that has ingredients
of "ground red pepper". And its from McCormick or Durkee, I forget which.

I submit that for 99% of the cooks in the world, the fine line of what is Cayenne
probably doesn't matter, either.



From: http://www.mobymud.com/spicy.htm
Interestingly, chilli is the original spelling from the Central American Nahuatl Indians and both chile and chili are derived from it.

From: http://www.chilipepper.com/AboutChil...7/Default.aspx
Spelling and usage
The three primary spellings are chili, chile and chilli, all of which are recognized by dictionaries.
Chili is also widely used, but this spelling is discouraged by some, since it is more commonly used to refer to a popular Southwestern-American dish (also known as chili con carne, the official state dish of Texas), as well as to the mixture of cumin and other spices (chili powder) used to flavor it. Chile powder, on the other hand, refers to dried, ground chile peppers. As with the alternative pronunciation of "route" after the song "route 66", this spelling was popularized in part by the band Red Hot Chili Peppers.
Chile is the American spelling (uncommon elsewhere, [surprise surprise!]) which refers specifically to this plant and its fruit. This orthography is universal in the Spanish-speaking world, although in some parts the plant and its fruit are better known as ají. In the American southwest (particularly northern New Mexico), chile also denotes a thick, spicy, un-vinegared sauce, which is available in red and green varieties and which is often served over most New Mexican cuisine.
Chilli is the preferred spelling according to the Oxford English Dictionary, although it also lists chile and chili as variants.


From: www.fiery-foods.com/dave/profile_cayenne.html
Cayenne as a Medicine
Cayenne is a pod type of the annuum species, and there are many cultivars, or varieties that are grown around the world. However, the cayenne you buy for use in capsules and cooking may not be made from the cayenne pod type--in fact, it probably is not. Cayenne pod types are grown around the world, mostly in Africa, India, and the United States. But in the U.S., for example, the entire crop, most of which is grown in New Mexico and West Texas, is used in the manufacture of Louisiana-style hot sauces. Virtually any small, hot red chile can be ground and placed in a capsule and called cayenne. But this is not necessarily an indictment because there is no difference in the composition of the different pod types and varieties of the annuum species, except in flavor elements and heat level. In summary, a capsule of ground piquin pods will virtually be the same in chemical composition as a capsule of ground cayenne pods. In fact, the American Spice Trade Association considers the term cayenne to be a misnomer and prefers the more generic term, red pepper.

From: http://www.foodproductdesign.com/articles/0201sr.html
Red pepper is increasingly significant in the spice trade. Spicy capsicum pepper consumption in the United States has increased 125% over the past 25 years. In its most general use, red pepper means a ground or crushed product, which may be produced from any variety of dried, fiery capsicum pods, or "chilies."
Ground red pepper is sometimes called "cayenne." This term carries no industry standard of heat level, nor is it a particular type of capsicum. As a result, the American Spice Trade Association (ASTA) has recommended that cayenne be phased out as a product term. In the meantime, when a company feels it should continue using the term to avoid customer confusion, ASTA suggests that cayenne be parenthetical to the main term, red pepper.

See also: http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=_...um=7&ct=result

From: http://www.atomos.net/chilli_02.htm
Chilli is made from the ground fruit of a plant in the Capsicum family. The fruits, commonly known as "chilies" or "Chillis," are fiery red or orange pods which rarely grow to more than 4 inches in length. The ground product ranges from orangered, to deep, dark red. According to the American Spice Trade Association, "Chilli" is the preferred name for all hot Chilli spices. Cayenne Chilli is another name for the same type of product. Some manufacturers use the term Cayenne Chilli to refer to a hotter version of Chilli.


From: http://www.greenpapaya.org/category/herbs/red-pepper/
Don’t Call It Cayenne
The term cayenne comes from the Caribbean Indian word kian. Today Cayenne is the capital of French Guiana. But ironically, only a tiny fraction of the u.s. red pepper supply comes from South America or the Caribbean. Most comes from India and Africa. Tabasco (Louisiana pepper) grows along the Gulf Coast of the United States. Because so little red pepper comes from around Cayenne, the American Spice Trade Association considers cayenne a misnomer and says this herb should be called red pepper.


From: http://www.freepatentsonline.com/5804239.html

The capsicum oleoresin ingredient of the composition of this invention is an isolate from plants of the Capsicum family, such as Capsicum annum and Capsicum frutescens. Available sources of capsicum oleoresin are commonly known as paprika, red pepper, chili pepper, and chile powder. Ground red pepper is sometimes referred to as "cayenne," to signify a ground red pepper product of extremely high heat, however, the word "cayenne" does not carry an industry standard of heat level nor is it a particular type of Capsicum. In the spice trade which is the major user of red pepper varietal and origin distinctions are being de-emphasized in favor of standardizing by heat level. Heat level can be expressed in ASTA (American Spice Trade Association) units equal to parts per million of capsaicin measured by high pressure liquid chromatography, or in organoleptically determined Scoville heat units (SU), whereby 1 ASTA unit=15 SU. Pungency levels of ground red pepper typically range from 300 to 1,000 ASTA Heat Units corresponding to 4,500 to 60,000 SU.
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Old 08-05-2008, 03:16 PM   #24
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I was rather surprised that the flesh of the cayenne peppers (sold as cayenne) I am window pot growing had a decidedly sweet taste to them before the heat kicks in.

Very different from bell, jalapeno and bird peppers, which are about my limit to eat
fresh. I have a Scoville units linked hiccup response, LOL!
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Old 08-05-2008, 03:24 PM   #25
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Yes - aren't they a delightful pepper? Once I started growing different CAYENNE CULTIVARS, I found myself using them fresh more & more rather than dry.

These days, the only ones I find myself drying are the smaller, thinner skinned Thai pepper varieties. The other types I grow (Hungarian Wax, Jalapenos, etc., etc.) I find myself using fresh or freezing for use during the winter.

(Notice that I've completely given up on ever educating poor misguided Waazu over in the UK - lol!!!)
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Old 08-05-2008, 03:59 PM   #26
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(Notice that I've completely given up on ever educating poor misguided Waaza over in the UK - lol!!!)
The fault, dear Breezy, lies not in our stars, but in ourselves.
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Old 08-05-2008, 04:23 PM   #27
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Lol - whatever floats your boat Waazu.

Tonight I'll be making "Spaghetti with Clam Sauce", & will, of course, be adding crushed CAYENNE pepper flakes from my own home-grown CAYENNE peppers. I think these are from the "Long Thin Cayenne" cultivar I grew last year. Can't abide by that "generic" stuff - lol!
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Old 08-05-2008, 05:30 PM   #28
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Lol - whatever floats your boat Waaza.

Tonight I'll be making "Spaghetti with Clam Sauce", & will, of course, be adding crushed CAYENNE pepper flakes from my own home-grown CAYENNE peppers. I think these are from the "Long Thin Cayenne" cultivar I grew last year. Can't abide by that "generic" stuff - lol!
aye, grow your own, wonderful stuff, at least you know where its been, but surely Italian chillies are not as hot as real cayenne chillies?

regards
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Old 08-05-2008, 06:01 PM   #29
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Actually, it doesn't make any difference where the pepper is grown. Cayenne peppers grown in Italy are just as hot as those grown in the U.S. The Mediterranean climate is ideal for pepper growing. But again - since "Cayenne" is a pepper variety, it doesn't make any difference whether it's grown in Italy or in the U.S., it's the same pepper.

And for any of you Cayenne fans out there, another one to keep an eye open for is "Long Yellow Cayenne". I grew it back in 1995 & wish I had kept some seeds, since it's still around, but hard to come by. Not quite as blistering hot as red types, but hot & fruity. Sort of like a milder Habenero in taste. Still with that long thin windy Cayenne appearance, but with a bright gold color when ripe. Was great to use fresh, but was also interesting to dry & mix with dried red Cayenne types.
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Old 08-05-2008, 06:19 PM   #30
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Actually, it doesn't make any difference where the pepper is grown. Cayenne peppers grown in Italy are just as hot as those grown in the U.S. The Mediterranean climate is ideal for pepper growing. But again - since "Cayenne" is a pepper variety, it doesn't make any difference whether it's grown in Italy or in the U.S., it's the same pepper.

And for any of you Cayenne fans out there, another one to keep an eye open for is "Long Yellow Cayenne". I grew it back in 1995 & wish I had kept some seeds, since it's still around, but hard to come by. Not quite as blistering hot as red types, but hot & fruity. Sort of like a milder Habenero in taste. Still with that long thin windy Cayenne appearance, but with a bright gold color when ripe. Was great to use fresh, but was also interesting to dry & mix with dried red Cayenne types.
I don't agree, I think climate and soil type and available fertilizer make a real difference. Loads of info on the net about this, unless you disagree, then you must be right again.
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