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Old 11-14-2014, 09:35 PM   #11
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For good selection and value spices, I've heard from several people that Penzey's is good. In addition, that hot dog chili would be awesome in a bread bowl
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Old 11-14-2014, 09:52 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by audiobuff2 View Post
For good selection and value spices, I've heard from several people that Penzey's is good. In addition, that hot dog chili would be awesome in a bread bowl
Penzey is an excellent product. But on the expensive side. Too much so for my sow's ear purse.

WElcome to DC. This is a great place to have fun, great conversations and loads of information.
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Old 11-16-2014, 12:27 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
Another good source for inexpensive spices are found in the grocery stores in clear cellophane packets hanging on display racks. Even normally very expensive sesame seeds can be found there at a fraction of the cost at the normal spice section of the store. All the spices are around a dollar, and can fill your empty spice jars. I'm amazed at the variety of spices that can be found there.
Can anyone say "Badia"! Cheap and good. Its amazing to see a tiny container of sesame seeds for example priced at 4-5 dollars.
The clear "Badia" spice packet is 99 cents. Just as good.

I really don't have room in my fridge for spices either. But they are to important to leave out. I make the room.
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Old 11-16-2014, 10:39 PM   #14
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I've had this happen to both cumin (an ingredient in chili powder) and cinnamon. Never to the actually hot pepper powder itself, that, if anything seems to get hotter. I buy turntables and keep my spices in small mason jars. One of the mason jar companies caught up with my idea and now actually sell a lid specifically for the purpose. I buy my spices in the plastic bags. Penzeys, by the way, becomes much more affordable if you buy it this way rather than in the jar. I also have a "spice guy" here in town who sells his spices -- a nicer selection the my other two choices (Piggly Wiggly and Wal-Mart) and fresher -- in bags as well. The jars are inexpensive and I wash and re-use them.
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Old 12-17-2014, 08:08 PM   #15
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For the old chili powder, couldn't one throw it in a small skillet and heat it up and toast it and then put it in the dish? Wouldn't it bring it back to life, or would it just take even more heat out of it. If I was not able to get to the store and had some old in the cupboard, I would try that. Seems like the dry heat would make it bloom. Am I talking sideways or what? Pros let me know. I am just an old country cook.
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Old 12-17-2014, 08:18 PM   #16
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I don't like the cheap exp. date ink printing they put on jars of spices that rub off over time, not to mention you have to practically send them to a forensic lab to read the exp. date stamped printing in the first place.

If you had any of the old spice left over, I bet you saw how the new stuff was a more vibrant color. But ya just don't notice that until you compare the old with the new. Understandable.
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Old 01-04-2015, 01:16 PM   #17
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I have lately in the last couple years had issues with taste and smell.
I have to ask my wife to check for seasoning for me.
I am certain it has something to do with my sinuses as I have a stuffy nose almost every day.
I had it on my list when i went for my annual physical, but somehow it got lost in the discussion with my doctor. I will make certain we discuss this next time i go in.

I tried to see if the chili powder in my fridge was fresh (this thread got me thinking) and I could not tell by smell nor taste if it was outdated and lost its flavor.
It was not hot for certain.
Should chili powder be hot? It was McCormick brand.
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Old 01-04-2015, 01:56 PM   #18
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I bought a new chili powder and it was potent for the first batch of chili. It faded over the next couple of uses, tho.

I'm going to try some chili powder from Penzey's next and see if that is better.

I've noticed some loss of taste as I got older (68). I never did have a keen sense of smell.
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Old 01-04-2015, 02:42 PM   #19
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Different chili powder makers make it differently, unfortunately. Some include a mix of dried chiles, some include other seasonings like cumin and garlic powder. I don't think it's supposed to be really hot; for that, use ground cayenne. It's supposed to add flavor.

Z is right that the senses of smell and taste diminish as we age. And they're related, so if you're losing one, both are declining.
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Old 01-04-2015, 02:46 PM   #20
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This was the nudge I needed to finish my Penzeys order so I could get free shipping.

I ordered a couple of chili powders to try out, and managed to get my free shipping order placed.
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