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Old 06-22-2012, 04:30 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chubbs
Its like a double seal.Instead of just leaving them on a shelf or drawer,I put them in a coffee jar.Thanks!
Should be fine.
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Old 07-02-2012, 02:23 AM   #12
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White pepper goes well with dishes that use chicken and/or chicken stock. Think Asian, especially Chinese, like hot and sour or egg flower soup.
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Old 07-02-2012, 06:10 AM   #13
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Chubbs: For Italian, Basilicata Chili Peppers

Buon Giorno Chubbs,

I am uncertain where these little red chili peppers from Basilicata in southeast Italia can be purchased, however, I would ask about the Italian Deli Groceries ... Perhaps, they have some for their own usage ...

Another lovely piquant chili pepper is: PIMIENTOS PADRÓN in the Pontevedra, Galicia region, and are from Designation of Origin: Padrón, Galicia, Spain ...

They are green like a Mexican Serrano chili pepper however, somewhat smaller ... They are sautéed in Evoo, and sprinkled with sea salt or Maldon and eaten as a Tapa in many Tapas Bars throughout Spain.

The last but not least chili pepper that Spain produces are the Basque Red Chili Peppers which are split open and sprinkled on a variety of Basque fish and shellfish stews ... They are called Guindillas in Spanish ... Cayenne in English ...

Interesting Post and thanks for kicking it off,
Ciao, Margi.
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Old 07-03-2012, 02:43 PM   #14
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Dried chilli or dried chilli flakes
Dried ginger powder
Different types of peppercorns, black, red, green. Get a grinder for all but the white pepper. They lose a lot of their flavour if they are not freshly ground.
Dried mint or even a mint plant for fresh mint.
Also, get a bay leaf plant, rather than dried leaves. I dont think they retain their flavour so well after drying.
Himalaya salt crystals
Raw cane sugar
Lime leaves. The dried ones seem OK. I never tried fresh ones, but they are likely better, if available at all.
Fresh vanilla pods.
Dried garlic is handy to have, for when you dont have fresh, and it tastes OK, even if not as sharp as the fresh.

All the above are flavours I love an use often, in my cooking. You can store you herbs and spices in jars that used to have food in them. Mine keep OK like that. If you have not bugs in your kitchen, it is also OK to roll down the top of the packet and pin with a clothes peg.
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Old 07-09-2012, 07:35 AM   #15
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I reiterate what someone already said; that is if you're limited in your community get ahold of a Penzey's catalog. The plus of this company is that you can buy the smaller jar so you don't have so much of any one spice that it overwhelms your kitchen and your cooking. Spices that I use a lot, I do buy sort of in bulk (have a spice purveyor so it isn't a huge amount, he packages it appropriately). And when I'm lucky enough to get to Madison, I hit Penzey's because they put out the spices and let you sample them. I think the last time I went they had three types of cinnamon, and more kinds of chili than you'd think existed. You can sample them and chose what is appropriate to your life.

The plus of the Penzey's catalog is that it is fun to read, has great recipes, etc.
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Old 07-09-2012, 08:34 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
Buon Giorno Chubbs,

I am uncertain where these little red chili peppers from Basilicata in southeast Italia can be purchased, however, I would ask about the Italian Deli Groceries ... Perhaps, they have some for their own usage ...

Another lovely piquant chili pepper is: PIMIENTOS PADRÓN in the Pontevedra, Galicia region, and are from Designation of Origin: Padrón, Galicia, Spain ...

They are green like a Mexican Serrano chili pepper however, somewhat smaller ... They are sautéed in Evoo, and sprinkled with sea salt or Maldon and eaten as a Tapa in many Tapas Bars throughout Spain.

The last but not least chili pepper that Spain produces are the Basque Red Chili Peppers which are split open and sprinkled on a variety of Basque fish and shellfish stews ... They are called Guindillas in Spanish ... Cayenne in English ...

Interesting Post and thanks for kicking it off,
Ciao, Margi.
Grazie tanto margi!And thank you everyone!
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Old 08-11-2012, 03:22 PM   #17
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Years ago I bought semi-bulk packages of things like bay leaves and oregano from Penzey's. I put them in mason jars and they lasted for a very long time (years)- much longer than the 6 mos. to one year that is usually advised- before losing potency. The thing is I can get good, for example, bay leaves for $1.00 an ounce if I buy a pound, vs. $4.00 - $8.00 an ounce in the small bottles you get at the supermarket. So for the cost of 4 little bottles I just got a whole pound- which, let me tell you, is an amazing amount of bay leaves (two quart mason jars plus 12 pint mason jars, stuffed). I will give some away and even if they last only two years I will still come out ahead.

So this is my new grand experiment. How long will they last if they are kept sealed, dry, cool and away from light?
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Old 08-11-2012, 03:29 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stock Pot
Years ago I bought semi-bulk packages of things like bay leaves and oregano from Penzey's. I put them in mason jars and they lasted for a very long time (years)- much longer than the 6 mos. to one year that is usually advised- before losing potency. The thing is I can get good, for example, bay leaves for $1.00 an ounce if I buy a pound, vs. $4.00 - $8.00 an ounce in the small bottles you get at the supermarket. So for the cost of 4 little bottles I just got a whole pound- which, let me tell you, is an amazing amount of bay leaves (two quart mason jars plus 12 pint mason jars, stuffed). I will give some away and even if they last only two years I will still come out ahead.

So this is my new grand experiment. How long will they last if they are kept sealed, dry, cool and away from light?
My Penzey's bay leaves are about 5 years old, and still tasty. I keep them in an old spaghetti jar, and will use them until they're gone. Whoa, a pound of bay leaves! I thought I got a lot in 6 ounces!

Heh. You could also make laurel wreaths and play Julius Caesar...
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Old 08-11-2012, 03:38 PM   #19
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Greek Spices & Eastern Mediterranean

The basic Greek spices include: garlic, white ground pepper, dill, wild orégano which is grown on numerous tiny islands, cinammon, cloves and Jamaican Pepper; lemon is utilised in numerous sauces and marinades; Greek Yogurt is also a key ingredient as well as Feta cheese.

Tomatoes, sun dried and fresh and parsley, marjoram. Extra virgin olive oil is grown extensively in various parts of Greece, and in these parts, it is the lard favored.

Cumin, parsley, cilantro and coriander are very popular in Lebanese classic cuisine.

When, we had travelled to Egypt long before the change in political regimen, we encountered many dishes employing onion, and chili peppers and cayenne used in hummus, babaghanuj along with tahine, sesame paste & in their traditional lamb and fish baked dishes, lovely assorted spice rubs.

Raisins & honey are also common ingredient in Greece & Turkey along with pinenuts, almonds, walnuts and pistachios, each region growing a different dried fruit or nut variety. Figs are also quite popular in Turkey.

Olives are marinated in lemon with thyme or chili pepper and orégano with lemon; or dill, orange and garlic; cilantro and orange or Seville Oranges which are a type of Sour Orange common in Spain and the Gulf countries of the Middle East. Walnuts are used in numerous salads too.

This is an interesting post,
Have lovely August.
Margaux.
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Old 08-11-2012, 04:23 PM   #20
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Yes, well the laurel wreath thing was the real reason I bought them (sheepish grin).
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