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Old 02-13-2018, 04:43 PM   #1
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How to use dulse?

I came across an article in the NYT the other day that highlighted dulse. Have any of you had any experience with it? Is it best used as a sprinkling, like dried oregano? If I’m adding it to seafood chowder, would I add it towards the beginning or end of cooking? Is it compatible with any other protein besides seafood, or will it make chicken or pork taste fishy? And what’s the difference between dulse and, say, nori or kombu, or any other seaweed?

That’s a lot of questions! I guess I shouldn’t have had that second cup of coffee this morning!

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Old 02-13-2018, 11:58 PM   #2
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I've had dulse before. I most often just eat it as a snack sort of like potato chips. Although, some of it is dried where it is more leathery, not as crunchy. It's still tasty, though.

My dad used to talk about when he was a boy in Ireland, he would collect the seaweed (it was called it dillisk there) with my grandmother, wash it, then hang it on wooden racks to dry in the sun.

My son likes to crunch or chop it up and sprinkle it on a bowl of rice, kind of like furikake. We also like to sprinkle it on steamed veggies, or even sunny side up eggs.

You can also use it to make a kind of dashi broth, or to make miso soup.

I like the idea of putting it in chowder. It will definitely add a fishy and salty dimension. I guess you could put it both in the soup as well as sprinkle a little over the top just before serving.
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Old 02-14-2018, 08:34 AM   #3
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My father was from the Maritimes and we always had some in the house. For me it is just a snack, slightly chewy and salty. I still keep some in the cupboard. I don't eat it a lot... think it is about 1 or 2 years for the same pack still good!

I have no idea of using it in recipes, truth to tell it just never occurred to me. I love seafood but not anything "fishy" tasting.

Think the only way to find the taste differences between dulse and nori/etc. is to sit down and try them
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Old 02-14-2018, 01:47 PM   #4
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Ive heard of it as a sea plant, fresh ... but not as a snack or condiment.

But thanks to you its on my list to dry. Will pick up some next time I go to whole foods.

THANKS
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Old 02-21-2018, 07:51 AM   #5
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I just bought some sheet nori for making tuna salad wraps and picked up a package of dulse along with it My idea was to use the dulse to make my own furikake. So I am reading this thread avidly. I already make my own dashi with kombu.
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Old 02-21-2018, 08:57 AM   #6
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PF, is the dulse you bought more dry and crunchy, or more pliable? It should be anywhere from dark maroon, to dark green with a red tint, too.

I'm trying to figureout if there are different varieties that are dried differently, more or less dry.
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Old 02-21-2018, 08:37 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
PF, is the dulse you bought more dry and crunchy, or more pliable? It should be anywhere from dark maroon, to dark green with a red tint, too.

I'm trying to figureout if there are different varieties that are dried differently, more or less dry.
Not sure, Bucky. It's coming tomorrow, bought it online. It's from the Maine Sea Vegetables Co. I'll let you know tomorrow if things go well here.
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Old 03-15-2018, 12:46 PM   #8
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Thanks for your responses

Thank you all! The dulse I finally got is flaked, not jerky style. It is indeed delicious on soups, rice, eggs and salads. I was a bit disappointed, though, as it isn’t much different from all the other seaweed in Japanese cuisine. I don’t know what I was expecting, but the way the NYT touted it, I thought it’d be something new and different!
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Old 03-15-2018, 01:03 PM   #9
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.... a print of dulsing at Horseshoe Cove by Hall's Harbour native, John Neville .
New Brunswick.
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Old 03-15-2018, 01:46 PM   #10
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.... a print of dulsing at Horseshoe Cove by Hall's Harbour native, John Neville .
New Brunswick.

That's very cool!!!! Tnx
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