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Old 10-11-2008, 08:25 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by blissful View Post
I'm not mixing my paprika problems with my curry problems. I'm just having difficulty figuring out how to use each set successfully. :) Thanks for the link!
Oops, sorry I misunderstood that.

I was just looking at a couple of the curry recipes and they do have long lists of spices If you don't want to invest that much, you could just get some garam masala - it's a blend with a bunch of spices already in it. Whole spices that are freshly toasted and ground will have more flavor, but this might be a good way to start. btw, I have a second coffee grinder that I use just for spices, in case you want to go that route. That way, my coffee doesn't flavor my spices, or the other way around HTH.
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Old 10-12-2008, 08:19 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Oops, sorry I misunderstood that.

I was just looking at a couple of the curry recipes and they do have long lists of spices If you don't want to invest that much, you could just get some garam masala - it's a blend with a bunch of spices already in it. Whole spices that are freshly toasted and ground will have more flavor, but this might be a good way to start. btw, I have a second coffee grinder that I use just for spices, in case you want to go that route. That way, my coffee doesn't flavor my spices, or the other way around HTH.
Not a problem thanks gotgarlic.
That second coffee grinder/spice grinder is a great idea, mine makes my coffee interesting
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Old 10-12-2008, 08:22 AM   #13
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Thanks blissful!! I have already begun the insurance company "headache" LOL
I know how I make curry chicken is now where near traditional, but we like it & it works
I have also heard of cooking the spices first to bring out the flavor, but never have done it. I prefer to not have to fuss too much when cooking, since my time is limited
As I said maybe one of the more experienced cooks here will come along and give you better answers
GrantsKat I feel your pain. We (neighbors) had a terrible flood this year and I've been working with the insurance company. I JUST replaced the furnace on last Tuesday and I have to shop now to replace a bunch of furniture. This all started in June and I'm still working on it.
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Old 10-13-2008, 06:46 AM   #14
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If you are using a store bought curry powder such as Keen's, try sauteing the onions with the curry powder and start with only a tablespoon. Add the other veges and meat and when you have them all browned, taste for depth of curry flavour and add more powder if necessary - but go gently! - then when you have that right, add some water to the dish and let simmer for a while. The heating of the spice mix before adding ingredients is more important when you are making your own spice blend from scratch. When using one of the normal powders, heat it a little but not like you would a made-to-measure one.

And Indian curry isn't for everyone. The flavours are quite distinctive when made fresh and cumin, cardamon, etc doesn't always appeal. I know I have a bottle of ground cumin in my cupboard and each time I open the door, I wonder where the smelly socks are!! Still like curry though!! (Provided it is mild.) Personally, I prefer Japanese or Thai curries. Very different in flavour to Indian curries. Also North Indian curries are different in style and flavour to South Indian curries. Oh and an Anglo-Indian curry is different again!

The best bet for getting your curry right, IMO, is to go to the website of the brand of curry powder you have and look for a recipe there.
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Old 10-13-2008, 08:03 PM   #15
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problem is, a curry powder will not let you produce a good 'curry', all it can provide is a curry powder flavoured sauce. Proper Indian food uses individual spices (or a mix of just a few at a time) because they have different properties, and need to added at different times. The problem with a curry powder is that the flavour will always be the same, OK if you think 'curry' is just one dish, but in India there are hundreds of different dishes, and thousands of different variants.

If you must use curry powder, mix with a little water first. This will reduce the likelyhood of the spices burning. Heat the chopped onions and fry on medium heat in a mildly flavoured oil or ghee until golden (about twenty minutes). Also add garlic/fresh root ginger/fresh chillies to taste. Then add the meat you are using (or even veg.) and then, once browned, add the spice paste, and continue cooking until the water has boiled away, and pure oil/fat separates from the meat/onions/spices. Now, either add a little water or stock so that the spices don't burn, and repeat until the oil separates again, or add a water based ingredient, such as yoghurt or tomatoes. There are so many different ways, now its up to you.

If you feel you would like to try a proper Indian dish, using the individual spices, I'm sure you will find it produces a far better (and varied) flavour.

Ten spices should give you about 50 - 60 different dishes, enough to keep you interested for a year or two, and collecting more spices along the way will open up your choices even further. Try to look at regional dishes rather than the usual 'restaurant' types.
HTH

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Old 10-14-2008, 10:14 AM   #16
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Got Garlic, that link to Jennas restaurant style chicken sounds worthwhile trying next.
Bilby, good advice.
This curry thing is very complicated and it sounds like I need to choose an area like Thai or Japanese and focus on one kind over another. I've just only had my mom's curry, pre ground mix off the standard grocery store spice rack.
Waaza, I have about half the spices, but, maybe for fun I'll get the rest of them and experiment a bit.
Thank you for the advice! ~Bliss
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Old 10-14-2008, 08:11 PM   #17
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Got Garlic, that link to Jennas restaurant style chicken sounds worthwhile trying next.
Bilby, good advice.
This curry thing is very complicated and it sounds like I need to choose an area like Thai or Japanese and focus on one kind over another. I've just only had my mom's curry, pre ground mix off the standard grocery store spice rack.
Waaza, I have about half the spices, but, maybe for fun I'll get the rest of them and experiment a bit.
Thank you for the advice! ~Bliss
My advice to you, Bliss, is not to experiment (this is where most people go wrong IMHO) get a very good recipe book on basic Indian food, and follow the instructions very carefully. Thai curries use little spice, relying more on fresh ingredients for the flavours. Japanese curry is usually made from a block of curry paste, very much like a chocolate brick, and is a poor example of spicing, IMHO.
HTH
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Old 10-15-2008, 11:00 AM   #18
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Japanese curries are much milder than Thai or any variant of Indian curries. Anglo-Indian curry is usually mild (provided the person in control of the curry can has taste buds left!), but Japanese curry is sweeter than them all. More closely aligned in flavour to the Anglo-Indian curry.

Curry powders, curry pastes and made-from-scratch curry blends all have their place in the world and all produce different effects. And not every brand of curry is as good as another - same as any product.

I like a good Thai green curry but there are so many different green curry pastes/powders/sauces out there that it becomes a case of trial and error. When you find a brand you like, stick to it.
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Old 10-15-2008, 01:57 PM   #19
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Japanese curries are much milder than Thai or any variant of Indian curries. Anglo-Indian curry is usually mild (provided the person in control of the curry can has taste buds left!), but Japanese curry is sweeter than them all. More closely aligned in flavour to the Anglo-Indian curry.

Curry powders, curry pastes and made-from-scratch curry blends all have their place in the world and all produce different effects. And not every brand of curry is as good as another - same as any product.

I like a good Thai green curry but there are so many different green curry pastes/powders/sauces out there that it becomes a case of trial and error. When you find a brand you like, stick to it.
I enjoy Thai curries too, in fact I have eaten my third in as many days, but I had a chat with my local Thai store owner (who is a good cook in her own right) and she agreed that no paste is as good as a paste made from fresh ingredients. It is not difficult, it just might be difficult to source fresh galangal and lemon grass. If you can't do that, then it may have to be pastes, though the flavour will be much inferior, IMHO.

I'm not sure I agree with you that there is a place for curry powder/paste, I would rather not make a 'curry' than have to make it with curry powder, but each to their own. There again, I would never eater American burgers, dawgs or pizzas.
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Old 10-15-2008, 02:54 PM   #20
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There again, I would never eater American burgers, dawgs or pizzas.
Why not? Hot dogs I can understand, but burgers and pizza? How are English burgers and pizza different from American? And btw, there are lots of different kinds of both.
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