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Old 09-29-2008, 12:00 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
Well I tried that spice mix on a whole butterflied chicken that I grilled. It smelled good when I made it but couldn't taste anything after it was cooked. I used quite a bit on both sides, maybe I should have pan or oven roasted instead?

I used this recipe except for the white pepper.
Hey, Jeeks. Yeah, 4 tsp. doesn't seem like a lot of seasoning for 2 lbs. of meat. I'd probably at least double it and try it again.

A lot of Middle Eastern cooking is based on Turkish cuisine, since the Ottoman Empire covered most of the Middle East, as well as North Africa, southern Europe and most of the Mediterranean for about 500 years. Here's a site with good information about Turkish food and ingredients: Turkish cuisine - All About Turkey

HTH.
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Old 09-29-2008, 12:21 PM   #12
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It seemed like plenty for the chicken. (shrug) In fact I thought I was over seasoning. The DW said I should just "do what you do" instead of following a recipe.

I guess I'll look online for already mixed packages rather than depleting my spice collection.
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Old 09-29-2008, 12:37 PM   #13
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Penzey's has a good one: Spices at Penzeys Spices Turkish Seasoning

And here's their recipe for Turkish kebabs: Turkish Kabobs (Izmir Style) - Recipes at Penzeys Spices

I loved the kebabs in Turkey HTH.
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Old 09-29-2008, 12:50 PM   #14
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Cool, thanks for the links.
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Old 09-30-2008, 08:03 AM   #15
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Spices placed on the outside of the bird will impart little if any seasoning to the actual meat. If the spice mix is a powder try placing it in a brine and brining the chicken, I use this method quite a bit to give a bird more flavor. You can also look for an older bird, most chickens sold in the US are quite young and have little flavor. When I want to really impress, I'll get a big old "Oven Stuffer" and butterfly it and brine it with a cajun spice mix in the brine. It really comes out with a deep flavor.
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Old 10-13-2008, 08:27 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
Well I tried that spice mix on a whole butterflied chicken that I grilled. It smelled good when I made it but couldn't taste anything after it was cooked. I used quite a bit on both sides, maybe I should have pan or oven roasted instead?

I used this recipe except for the white pepper.
maybe one should say exactly what one means by 'Middle East'. Ras el hanout is typically a Moroccan spice mix, not what I would call Middle East.

Ras el hanout is not used as you have used it (as a rub). Just rubbing it into meat and grilling/broiling will drive off most of the flavour as you have found. If you say what you are after, maybe that would be a start.
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Old 10-14-2008, 12:06 PM   #17
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maybe one should say exactly what one means by 'Middle East'. Ras el hanout is typically a Moroccan spice mix, not what I would call Middle East.

Ras el hanout is not used as you have used it (as a rub). Just rubbing it into meat and grilling/broiling will drive off most of the flavour as you have found. If you say what you are after, maybe that would be a start.
HTH
Waaza
Don't know what I'm after. I'm a total Noob when it comes to spice mixes like that. Just trying to get my feet wet.
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Old 10-14-2008, 08:53 PM   #18
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Don't know what I'm after. I'm a total Noob when it comes to spice mixes like that. Just trying to get my feet wet.
I understand, at least you have admitted your ignorance of these matters, its a pity most chefs don't do the same!

My suggestion to you is to start simply, with a few spices, learn how to use them, what goes with what, and most importantly, how to maximize the flavours.

Throwing heavy spice mixes over meat (or even worse, vegetables) will kill the flavour of the meat/veg. Spices, used properly, enhance flavours (and can suppress other off flavours), but all are used in moderation, so one can still taste the flavour of the food being spiced. Think 'pepper', how much do you use? And learn how to cook them, especially the importance of oil/fat in their use. Start separating spices into groups of similar properties and flavour. Any help you need, just ask.
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Old 11-17-2008, 08:10 PM   #19
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I am lazy, and so when I can, I try to use ready-made spice mixes rather than made-from-scratch spices. So here are a few tips that make my life easy:

Try the World Spice Market in Seattle. They have an online store as well. All their spices are great. They roast and grind them fresh. Their Harissa and Ras-al-Hanout are outstanding!

Try Zamourispices online. Their Egyptian spice mix and their kebab mix are great! They have a harissa paste that will clear your sinuses right out!

Try eFoodDepot online. They carry a spice brand called "Sadaf". I have never had a problem with any of their spice mixes.
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Old 12-21-2008, 12:18 PM   #20
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i have used baharat before but i think thats a blend of spices rather than just a spice on its own
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