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Old 01-01-2014, 06:21 PM   #21
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As an experienced Cilantro Farmer I can tell you that cilantro does NOT like to be transplanted or messed about with in any way.

I used to grow my own cilantro. Although fairly easy to grow in milder/cooler temps it will bolt (grow tall and go to seed) at the drop of a hat. I always cringe when I see nurseries offer seedlings of cilantro for sale.
I tried growing some from seed last summer. It wasn't a bad summer but the cilantro wouldn't play. I've also tried growing on the stuff in pots from the supermarket without success. The potted supermarket stuff we get here is so immature that it doesn't taste of anything much.
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Old 01-01-2014, 07:22 PM   #22
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I tried growing some from seed last summer. It wasn't a bad summer but the cilantro wouldn't play.
Not that you asked but here's what I did to grow my cilantro.

First I took those really hard round seeds and put them between 2 paper towels and ran a rolling pin over them to lightly. (My form of scarification--- which means to nick or weaken the hard seed coat that cilantro has.) Some seed have seed coats so hard that they cannot absorb moisture.

Then I put those seeds between two dampened paper towels in a petri dish or CLEAN cottage cheese carton or ?? that had a lid and waited. Sometimes a week, sometimes less and sometimes more. Depends on temp.

Within a few days a radical (root foot) starts appearing and when a lot of the seeds do that then I spread the seeds on the prepared soil, VERY lightly covered them or just pressed them in lightly. I then put a damp burlap sack or some of that black shade cloth over them and kept it lightly misted until most of them germinated.

Now that I've astounded you with my tenacity you can believe me when I say I really like cilantro!

It actually doesn't take much effort and just a little time; just describing it is harder than doing it.

I kept a steady supply going by succession plantings. And I learned not to even consider growing them in a large pot or box!
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Old 01-01-2014, 09:37 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cave76 View Post
Not that you asked but here's what I did to grow my cilantro.

First I took those really hard round seeds and put them between 2 paper towels and ran a rolling pin over them to lightly. (My form of scarification--- which means to nick or weaken the hard seed coat that cilantro has.) Some seed have seed coats so hard that they cannot absorb moisture.

Then I put those seeds between two dampened paper towels in a petri dish or CLEAN cottage cheese carton or ?? that had a lid and waited. Sometimes a week, sometimes less and sometimes more. Depends on temp.

Within a few days a radical (root foot) starts appearing and when a lot of the seeds do that then I spread the seeds on the prepared soil, VERY lightly covered them or just pressed them in lightly. I then put a damp burlap sack or some of that black shade cloth over them and kept it lightly misted until most of them germinated.

Now that I've astounded you with my tenacity you can believe me when I say I really like cilantro!

It actually doesn't take much effort and just a little time; just describing it is harder than doing it.

I kept a steady supply going by succession plantings. And I learned not to even consider growing them in a large pot or box!
Why? What happens?
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Old 01-02-2014, 10:14 AM   #24
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TL----- Sorry, I''d already written so much I just knew that people wouldn't want to read any more.
[growing cilantro in pot or box]

This is just my experience with growing cilantro in containers so if anyone has had luck then please post that.

The plants will do their bolting 'thing' really fast. Or just plain ol' not thrive. Some leaves would appear and be usable but not nearly as much as if in the ground.

Cilantro is in the parsley family and has really deep roots. Maybe that's why they don't like pots. Having said that I DID grow a parsley plant in a pot one year and it did great! But in future tries, same pot/same type of soil/same weather----- just bolted or sat there looking sad. Go figure. I can't.
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Old 01-02-2014, 02:19 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cave76 View Post
TL----- Sorry, I''d already written so much I just knew that people wouldn't want to read any more.
[growing cilantro in pot or box]

This is just my experience with growing cilantro in containers so if anyone has had luck then please post that.

The plants will do their bolting 'thing' really fast. Or just plain ol' not thrive. Some leaves would appear and be usable but not nearly as much as if in the ground.

Cilantro is in the parsley family and has really deep roots. Maybe that's why they don't like pots. Having said that I DID grow a parsley plant in a pot one year and it did great! But in future tries, same pot/same type of soil/same weather----- just bolted or sat there looking sad. Go figure. I can't.
Ah! So for me, who doesn't really want the leaves, just the seeds, growing it in a pot should be okay.

I usually mean to grow stuff from seed, but I usually have to buy seedlings. I bought a pot of parsley with a few small plants. I put them in the garden. They grew well and came back the next year, it's a biannual. It's been going for a while now and taking over a corner of the garden. I moved some chives into a pot and a parsley plant came along for the ride. I planted into a 10" deep pot full of compost. The chives did okay. The parsley went gang busters. I have never seen such a large, leafy parsley plant. In fact, I brought the pot inside and the parsley is still putting out new leaves, even though it isn't looking very happy.
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Old 01-02-2014, 02:34 PM   #26
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I tried growing some from seed last summer. It wasn't a bad summer but the cilantro wouldn't play. I've also tried growing on the stuff in pots from the supermarket without success. The potted supermarket stuff we get here is so immature that it doesn't taste of anything much.
Seedlings are getting so expensive for all vegetables, I decided last summer to save seeds from things I like. Store bought vegetable seeds.
I started with some red bell pepper seeds and they grew great. But I put them in so late, I ended up with immature fruit. I did get a few that were starting to turn in late October. It was just a test anyway to see.
So it looks good to go this spring with seeds I am collecting.

I also use containers as I cannot work a regular garden. I was able to obtain many large plastic pots a few years ago from our local nursery. Now that they realize these pots are worth money, I cannot get free ones anymore.
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Old 01-02-2014, 03:10 PM   #27
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TL sadi:
"Ah! So for me, who doesn't really want the leaves, just the seeds, growing it in a pot should be okay."

I'm sure they'll stay alive, bolt, flower and produce some seeds. Maybe. (grin)
If you only use a few coriander seeds during the year then you may get enough.

Now, next summer----- prove me a liar! LOL
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Old 01-02-2014, 06:25 PM   #28
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To extend storage life in the fridge I usually wash cilantro and trim off part of the stems, cleaning out any thing turning yellow or brown. Then I loosely roll the damp cilantro in a couple of paper towels and put back in food storage bag making sure to loosely gather then of bag but not seal. This goes into the fridge and will usually keep for about 10 days - best of all it's clean - fully prepped for quick use.
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Old 01-03-2014, 10:26 AM   #29
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Janet----- that makes a lot of sense. My only problem is after going shopping I'm so whupped that it's all I can do to get cold things into the fridge before I have to sit down and rest. Once it's in the fridge----- out of sight, out of mind. LOL
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Old 01-04-2014, 05:28 PM   #30
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I've tried to grow it here, where anything will grow and I just gave up.

I use it often, and just around the corner is a Mexican market that sells it for a quarter a bunch, so why bother? Like Janet, I just wrap it in a damp paper towel and leave it in the crisper drawer in the plastic bag from the market. I even use it in green salad, so it never goes bad before I run out.
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Keeping cilantro fresh I'm one of those people who loves cilantro but buying it in the market and then keeping it fresh in the fridge is sometimes a problem if I don't use the entire bunch. What do others do to help keep their cilantro fresh? 3 stars 1 reviews
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