"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Herbs and Spices
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-17-2012, 11:55 AM   #1
Executive Chef
 
Rocklobster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ottawa Valley, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,794
Korean Chili substitute.

I have just chopped up the Napa for a batch of Kimchi I am going to make today. I don't have any actual Korean powdered chili. But, I have many other kinds. What would be similar? I have cayenne, red pepper flakes, two different kinds of indian chili powder, sambal olek, Chinese chili in oil. I even have some Habanero powder. How hot is the Korean stuff? I would like to get close to the authentic. I think I may go with this Pul Biber stuff from Turkey, because it is a bit milder than the others.

__________________

__________________
Rocklobster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2012, 12:07 PM   #2
Head Chef
 
spork's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Landlocked in Southwest U.S.
Posts: 1,123
sambal, with extra garlic powder, rock, i'm not familiar with pul biber, kimchi is very potent stuff, not meant to be eaten without main starch
__________________

__________________
spork is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2012, 12:13 PM   #3
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
It is SO hard to say "how hot", it is so subjective. The main thing about Korean chili flakes for kimchee is that it has no seeds. That said, in absence I have used just about everything you have mentioned, except the Chinese chili in oil I think that my best luck has been red pepper flakes; that's closest to the pepper I've bought that is produced for the purpose (I've also used Vietnamese chile garlic sauce). The Korean kimchee chili I've bought at Asian markets was not a powder, but the flakes minus the seeds.

As I said, the heat is up to you. This isn't something you make now and eat in an hour. Go modest, let sit for a day (enough for the chili flakes to reconstitute), give it a taste. If it isn't hot enough, then go ahead and add one of the chili powders.

Some of the Korean stuff is knock your socks off. The last bag I bought was very mild (remember, subjective ... to me) and I wound up adding chili powder that I think was from India, to heat it up.

All of the Koreans I've met and shared Kimchee with were in this country and had lived here for years. They made kimchee out of just about anything they could find. Most interesting was one made from boiled potatoes . Think a very, very zippy potato salad. Least favorite are the fishy ones.
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2012, 12:31 PM   #4
Head Chef
 
spork's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Landlocked in Southwest U.S.
Posts: 1,123
I've also used Viet chile-garlic, and always have la-yu chinese chili in oil tableside, but my frig usually has a 6oz bottle of kimuchi marinade that lasts nearly half a year, doesn't take much of it for even half a head of napa.
__________________
spork is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2012, 12:32 PM   #5
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,419
Gochugaru is what's normally used for Kimchi. Because of the way it's prepared, there really isn't a substitute. Given what you have available, I would use a mix of the Indian chili powder and cayenne, using the Indian powder to provide sweetness and the cayenne to adjust the heat. Maybe a 3 to 2 blend, depending on how hot you like your kimchi. If you have any Spanish smoked paprika on hand, you might even toss in a pinch to give it a little bit of a smoky flavor.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2012, 12:44 PM   #6
Head Chef
 
spork's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Landlocked in Southwest U.S.
Posts: 1,123
also a shot of straight vinegar. i like my kimchi raw, but most people shock their cabbage.
__________________
spork is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2012, 09:36 PM   #7
Head Chef
 
powerplantop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 2,157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire View Post
It is SO hard to say "how hot", it is so subjective. The main thing about Korean chili flakes for kimchee is that it has no seeds. That said, in absence I have used just about everything you have mentioned, except the Chinese chili in oil I think that my best luck has been red pepper flakes; that's closest to the pepper I've bought that is produced for the purpose (I've also used Vietnamese chile garlic sauce). The Korean kimchee chili I've bought at Asian markets was not a powder, but the flakes minus the seeds.

As I said, the heat is up to you. This isn't something you make now and eat in an hour. Go modest, let sit for a day (enough for the chili flakes to reconstitute), give it a taste. If it isn't hot enough, then go ahead and add one of the chili powders.

Some of the Korean stuff is knock your socks off. The last bag I bought was very mild (remember, subjective ... to me) and I wound up adding chili powder that I think was from India, to heat it up.

All of the Koreans I've met and shared Kimchee with were in this country and had lived here for years. They made kimchee out of just about anything they could find. Most interesting was one made from boiled potatoes . Think a very, very zippy potato salad. Least favorite are the fishy ones.
Claire, good advice I have had mild Gochugaru and some that was really spicy.
__________________
My YouTube cooking channel
powerplantop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2012, 09:37 PM   #8
Head Chef
 
powerplantop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 2,157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Gochugaru is what's normally used for Kimchi. Because of the way it's prepared, there really isn't a substitute. Given what you have available, I would use a mix of the Indian chili powder and cayenne, using the Indian powder to provide sweetness and the cayenne to adjust the heat. Maybe a 3 to 2 blend, depending on how hot you like your kimchi. If you have any Spanish smoked paprika on hand, you might even toss in a pinch to give it a little bit of a smoky flavor.

That mix with some smoked paprika would make a nice Kimchi.
__________________
My YouTube cooking channel
powerplantop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2012, 09:39 PM   #9
Head Chef
 
powerplantop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 2,157
Quote:
Originally Posted by spork View Post
also a shot of straight vinegar. i like my kimchi raw, but most people shock their cabbage.
Please no vinegar in the kimchi. The sour should come from fermentation. Adding vinegar is not the same.
__________________
My YouTube cooking channel
powerplantop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2012, 11:21 PM   #10
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
Shock as is boiling it? Never seen that done. Salt, weigh, and drain for a day. Taste. If too salty, rinse and drain again. Then the garlic and green onions and pepper. This is how I was taught by friends.
__________________

__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
chili, substitute

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:48 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.