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Old 05-24-2009, 02:22 PM   #11
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I had some in my herb garden a few years ago, but never used it. I thought it was a beautiful addition to the garden. Maybe I should have researched then.
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Old 05-24-2009, 05:34 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loprraine View Post
We were going to buy some lovage seeds, but for some unknown reason opted not to. After reading this thread, I sure wish we had bought them.
Loprraine (& anyone else interested in growing Lovage) - while I always thing buying annual herb plants (as opposed to seed) is a waste of $$, Lovage, being a perennial, is definitely a good plant purchase. And this time of year, many nurseries - including the big box garden centers - carry it. It's worth looking around for.

Another plus for buying it by the plant rather than sowing seed is the fact that it's quite a large plant at maturity (mine reached 4'-5' in height the first season & 6' the next, with a 3' spread), so just a couple of plants will go a long way. Most folks really don't need the dozens they'd end up with via seed.
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Old 05-25-2009, 09:49 AM   #13
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I think the loss of smell and taste had to do with menopause. I lost 25 lbs because nothing smelled good. But now that I'm post-menopausal, it all smells and tastes delicious. Those 25 lbs are right back on my middle.

As far as buying seeds or plants, well, if you live south of the mason-dixon line, you pretty much can afford to say that it is a waste to buy plants rather than seeds. I've gardened in Virginia, Hawaii, and Florida and am here to tell you, plants are the way to go when you live in the north. It has its advantages, the summer days are very long compared to down south. But the season is very short, so plants, to me, are the way to go. I grow greens and some herbs from seed, but vegetables I buy as plants. Once I plant a tomato or pepper, from seed, by the time it bears fruit, it will be killed by frost.
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Old 05-25-2009, 10:20 AM   #14
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Claire - I was talking about annual HERBS, not annual vegetables (or flowers for that matter). There's a BIG difference.

Regardless of what part of the country you live in (& I've gardened in NY as well as VA), an $.88-$1.00 packet of basil seed will germinate in just 4-5 days (sown indoors or out) & give you dozens & dozens of usable plants in a very short amount of time, versus a tiny little pot from the nursery costing anywheres from $2.50-$3.50. Both will expire with the first frost. The seed is still the better value when it comes to annual herbs.
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Old 05-25-2009, 10:59 AM   #15
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Thanks, Brrezy, I'll look for it at the garden centres. You're right about the seeds. The Holy Basil, Cress, and pumpkins were up in 2 days.
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Old 05-25-2009, 04:25 PM   #16
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I, too have a problem with having to buy too many seeds or seedlings for my garden. My solution has been to share them with friends who like to garden. When I lived in Florida, Mom, my sisters, and I would simply split the cost. Now I have a few more dollars, but no family near-by, and I simply give them away. Herbs that were perennials in Florida and Hawaii aren't here, even thyme sometimes can't take a bad winter, and it is pretty hardy. On the other hand, I have a sage plant that is propigating itself, and I grew it from a seedling when we were on the road and I had an herb garden in a pot, then put it in the ground when we moved here. Parsley is generally biennual and I've grown it from seeds or in pots .... Many of my herbs that were perennial just couldn't hack the last couple of winters where we had -30 degrees for long periods of time. I actually managed to kill my mint this winter (yes, I did it on purpose, it was killing the rest of the herb garden), and missed having it for mint juleps this month. I thought I had it contained, but it went under a sidewalk and started killing everything. So husband and I put containers within the containers (I simply won't live without mint) and started over again. My tarragon couldn't take the hit this winter, but ironically, some cilantro came up that is easily 2 years old. My regular thyme hasn't survived the past two winters, and if I grew it from seed I'd not have any to eat because a freeze would kill such a tender young plant. Ironically, my less favorite thymes (creeping and lemon) seem to think that 35 below is OK with them.
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