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Old 07-04-2008, 07:24 PM   #11
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I don't make any connection of MSG (which I hate) with hydrolyzed plant protein defined as a protein obtained from various foods (like soybeans, corn or wheat), then broken down into amino acids by a chemical process called acid hydrolysis.
Well, I'm not an expert or anything, but this is the first place where I read it. I looked on answers.com to see what they had to say about hydrolyzed protein, but they just quoted the Wikipedia page I linked above.
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Old 07-04-2008, 07:33 PM   #12
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It's still very popular in Germany I remember my grandmother using it when I was little. You can get the original Maggi not the kind from China from here German food from GermanDeli.com
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Old 07-07-2008, 11:12 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by mcnerd View Post
I don't make any connection of MSG (which I hate) with hydrolyzed plant protein defined as a protein obtained from various foods (like soybeans, corn or wheat), then broken down into amino acids by a chemical process called acid hydrolysis.

Both MSG and hydrolyzed plant protein contains free glutamic acid -- it's what acts as a flavor enhancer. UMAMI.

Many foods have naturally occurring free glutamic acid -- mushrooms, tomatoes, some cheeses, anchovies.
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Old 07-07-2008, 11:54 AM   #14
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I use maggi cubes to make stock for soups.
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Old 07-08-2008, 02:03 PM   #15
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From what little I've used it, I'd almost call it an "Asian Kitchen Bouquet." It's mostly concentrated vegetable flavor, isn't it?
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Old 07-08-2008, 02:18 PM   #16
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I use Maggi seasoning in green salsa. I don't know what it tastes like plain, but it's great in the salsa!
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Old 07-08-2008, 02:26 PM   #17
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I cannot visualize an Asian connection with Maggi Seasoning or Kitchen Bouquet.
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Old 07-08-2008, 02:34 PM   #18
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I cannot visualize an Asian connection with Maggi Seasoning or Kitchen Bouquet.
You can buy Maggi seasoning in just about any asian market. People sub it for soy sauce. They even make a "Maggi -- Taste of Asia" line of products.

"Maggi® Seasoning is an extremely versatile sauce made from the natural extract of pure vegetable proteins. Made in China, this sauce features a distinctive flavor and aroma, which adds zest and depth to soups, salads, and vegetables with just a few dashes. An excellent sauce for marinating, stir-frying, and dipping, Maggi® Seasoning is made naturally without any food preservatives."


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Old 07-08-2008, 04:40 PM   #19
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This is the original Maggi from Germany
Maggi Wuerze 1000g (German Maggi Seasoning)

This explains the Maggi products, they make products to suit many different countries around the world
Maggi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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