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Old 01-14-2016, 09:10 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by blissful View Post
There was a short blip on ATK or Cook's country, if you microwave garlic to 140 degrees F, it will not be hot when cut/crushed/sliced. They mentioned it also works with onions.
Since I can not put foil in my microwave, I can wrap a couple of bulbs in parchment paper after preparing them with olive oil as you would for the oven. Will have to staple that idea to my brain so it doesn't get lost.
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Old 01-16-2016, 12:43 PM   #22
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That's the only way I can think to describe it. It was an unpleasant burning sensation. I don't like raw garlic, though, unless it's minced very fine or mashed to a paste and mixed with other ingredients.
I tried a raw whole clove once as a child and that was the last time I tried a large piece raw.
Yes, all the raw garlic I use in squeezed through a masher/press, microplaned or chopped and mashed into a puree on my cutting board.

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Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
Sure. I get the big bag of garlic from Costco, roast a bunch of bulbs, and squeeze them all into a ziplock that I flatten, then freeze. Then I can just break off a chunk when I want some.
I see they have a bag of peeled cloves. Ever try them? I'm afraid to, as I would think they would not be as fresh tasting as whole garlic heads.
Besides there is to much in the bag. Even for us.

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But do you let others know about the raw garlic in the butter? Like GG and myself who do not like raw garlic, I doubt is either one of us would want to find it on a piece of bread or toast.
Nope. Never even crossed my mind to tell anyone about anything served.
The plate is big enough for the guest to move it out of the way should they not like something.
I rarely serve garlic butter by itself. Its usually used for garlic bread or similar and that would be cooked garlic.
I sometimes put a pat on a steak. That would be raw garlic and raw parsley. Very good BTW.
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Old 01-16-2016, 01:16 PM   #23
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The first time I had tzatziki, not already on something, I liked it so much that I just kept eating it. After a while, it started to get "hot". I hadn't realized that if you ate enough raw garlic, it would taste "hot".
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Old 01-16-2016, 01:56 PM   #24
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Since I can not put foil in my microwave, I can wrap a couple of bulbs in parchment paper after preparing them with olive oil as you would for the oven. Will have to staple that idea to my brain so it doesn't get lost.
Addie, you can put the garlic in the microwave all by it self if you like.

HOTNESS in garlic happens when you chop/slice/crush it, from that point when it is very hot, the hotness dissipates over the next 24-36 hours. So things like pesto, garlic butter go from having that 'hotness' to being mild when stored for a while. (The hotness is activated by chemicals (allicin) in the garlic upon chopping/slicing/crushing it.)

Onions are similar, if you chop onions the process of chopping it, causes sulfuric acid to be released. If you rinse off the outside of the chopped onions you will wash the sulfuric acid off of them, making them milder, for preparations such as salads.

The purpose of this is to discourage predators from taking a chomp on them.
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Old 01-17-2016, 12:39 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by blissful View Post
HOTNESS in garlic happens when you chop/slice/crush it, from that point when it is very hot, the hotness dissipates over the next 24-36 hours. So things like pesto, garlic butter go from having that 'hotness' to being mild when stored for a while. (The hotness is activated by chemicals (allicin) in the garlic upon chopping/slicing/crushing it.)
Onions are similar, if you chop onions the process of chopping it, causes sulfuric acid to be released. If you rinse off the outside of the chopped onions you will wash the sulfuric acid off of them, making them milder, for preparations such as salads.
I understand horseradish is that way too? Loses heat as soon as its opened up to air?
I saw a show once on Wasabi and they took extra care to keep it away from air. They were fanatical about allowing air to reach the product.

I have been hearing this idea of rinsing off onion and i am going to try it.
We eat lots of onions around here and many times they are raw.
I guess rinse then dry it off in the fridge?
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Old 01-17-2016, 12:51 PM   #26
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I understand horseradish is that way too? Loses heat as soon as its opened up to air?
I saw a show once on Wasabi and they took extra care to keep it away from air. They were fanatical about allowing air to reach the product.

I have been hearing this idea of rinsing off onion and i am going to try it.
We eat lots of onions around here and many times they are raw.
I guess rinse then dry it off in the fridge?
Hi Rollbones, Yes I think the earlier you add the vinegar to the horseradish, the hotter it stays, so they say.On the little ATK, he took the onions that were chopped, put them in a sieve and rinsed it under cold water in the sink, they drained and put in a serving dish, I've also seen chefs put the sliced or chopped onions in icewater for a few minutes, then drain, and serve.
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Old 01-17-2016, 04:02 PM   #27
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Hi Rollbones, Yes I think the earlier you add the vinegar to the horseradish, the hotter it stays, so they say.On the little ATK, he took the onions that were chopped, put them in a sieve and rinsed it under cold water in the sink, they drained and put in a serving dish, I've also seen chefs put the sliced or chopped onions in icewater for a few minutes, then drain, and serve.
Rick Bayless does that, too, when making pico de gallo. He just chops and rinses the onion first and lets it drain in the sieve while he prepares the rest of the ingredients.
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