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Old 07-10-2014, 06:17 PM   #61
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We have a huge rosemary bush and I often take the sprigs and toss them into the propane fire pit, filling the air with a nice aroma.
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Old 07-10-2014, 07:06 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
We have a huge rosemary bush and I often take the sprigs and toss them into the propane fire pit, filling the air with a nice aroma.
Cool...it would smell like a pine campfire!!
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Old 07-11-2014, 03:27 PM   #63
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I wonder how they manage to reproduce by themselves, on a sunny, dry hill in France without someone soaking them all the time.
You are totally missing the point. The point has nothing to do with the plant itself. Its all about the peat starter pots or pods as some call them.

These things are completely dry when you buy them. They are designed to be soaked either right before you put the seed in or immediately after.
This is how a starter pod works.
The seed does not get soaked, it gets a steady moist medium until it sprouts.
When these pots start dry out, they are supposed to be soaked again or kept moist at all times.

The seed or seedling is never soaked or in standing water. They are inserted into these pots and they need to be kept moist until they sprout and are ready for planting.
Once they sprout they still need sufficient water to survive.

Once out of these pots, do as you like with them. But while the seed or plant resides in a starter pod, they require water. Lots of water or they will dry out and kill the plant.

Looking at the OP's photo, it is evident they are to dry.
It is also evident these are expanding type seed starter pellets, that must be soaked for them to expand.
The medium is to dry for those plants.
The OP should soak these pods and keep the complete pod moist. Not just a little bit of water near the plant.
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Old 07-11-2014, 07:59 PM   #64
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The question wasn't whether they should be watered, but knowing the plants come from a dry climate originally, exactly how much I should be watering them. They were soaked early that morning, they became that dry during the day and that is the shady side of the building.

I do know that plants need water to grow, I'm not a complete idiot, just a question of how much as I am a famous killer of plants, most of the time from over watering.
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Old 07-12-2014, 06:41 AM   #65
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
The question wasn't whether they should be watered, but knowing the plants come from a dry climate originally, exactly how much I should be watering them. They were soaked early that morning, they became that dry during the day and that is the shady side of the building.

I do know that plants need water to grow, I'm not a complete idiot, just a question of how much as I am a famous killer of plants, most of the time from over watering.
I have found the knuckle rule to be useful when it comes to plants. Except for cactus. Put you finger in the dirt down to your first knuckle. If the dirt feels moist, don't water. If dry, get water to them quickly. Use a watering can that has a long narrow spout. You are less likely to over water it. Water only until the top of the soil feels damp. It is a rule that has saved many a plant from my murderous attempts to kill it. When you have a houseful of plants, it can often be difficult to remember what plant gets what. That's why I always used a fish based fertilizer for them. It get diluted in water before feeding to the plants. Less likely to burn the plant with too much fertilizer.

Just be careful though. What felt as moist in the morning, can quickly become dry by afternoon. I always watered my plants in the evening. They will suck up less water overnight, then from morning to afternoon. During the hottest part of the day.

Unfortunately I get no sun in this apartment. So when I moved in here, I no longer have plants. I am on the north side of the building. I am lucky I even get daylight. I live in a cave.
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Old 07-12-2014, 08:13 AM   #66
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
I have found the knuckle rule to be useful when it comes to plants. Except for cactus. Put you finger in the dirt down to your first knuckle. If the dirt feels moist, don't water. If dry, get water to them quickly. Use a watering can that has a long narrow spout. You are less likely to over water it. Water only until the top of the soil feels damp. It is a rule that has saved many a plant from my murderous attempts to kill it. When you have a houseful of plants, it can often be difficult to remember what plant gets what. That's why I always used a fish based fertilizer for them. It get diluted in water before feeding to the plants. Less likely to burn the plant with too much fertilizer.

Just be careful though. What felt as moist in the morning, can quickly become dry by afternoon. I always watered my plants in the evening. They will suck up less water overnight, then from morning to afternoon. During the hottest part of the day.

Unfortunately I get no sun in this apartment. So when I moved in here, I no longer have plants. I am on the north side of the building. I am lucky I even get daylight. I live in a cave.
That works with houseplants, which mostly came from the moist tropics, but most herbs are from drier climates, so they don't usually need daily watering. That can kill them quickly. Basil is the primary exception;I always plant that with my tomatoes so they get a lot of watering.

I've never grown herbs from seed, PF, so I'm sorry, I can't advise you on that.
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Old 07-12-2014, 10:46 AM   #67
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I'm just going to dump a glass of water on them for good measure this morning on my way by, recheck them before the sun gets on that side. Less sun exposure where they are sitting, but it is the asphalt side of the building so it gets much hotter. My patio is at the end of the building so gets sun exposure almost all day and our temps are holding in the 90's this weekend, supposed to get to 100 tomorrow.
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Old 07-12-2014, 11:34 AM   #68
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I'm just going to dump a glass of water on them for good measure this morning on my way by, recheck them before the sun gets on that side. Less sun exposure where they are sitting, but it is the asphalt side of the building so it gets much hotter. My patio is at the end of the building so gets sun exposure almost all day and our temps are holding in the 90's this weekend, supposed to get to 100 tomorrow.
It is only 81F here. No humidity. No A/C or fan on. Very comfortable. But then I am old and love the heat.
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Old 07-13-2014, 11:59 AM   #69
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I do know that plants need water to grow, I'm not a complete idiot, just a question of how much as I am a famous killer of plants, most of the time from over watering.
No one said you were.
Were those pellets you soaked, to get them to puff up? Its what they look like.
I would get a bucket of water and fill it up with water and little soluble fertilizer. A peat container or pod has zero nutrients and is only a medium for the seedings to get a start in.
I would drop each pod into the nutrient rich water until they sink and are fully soaked. (This will not hurt the seedling).
Remove from the solution and allow to drip dry. When they fell light again, semi dry, drop them in again.
Once you have a decent size seedling, then you can plant the pod and seedling into the garden or into a container.
Make sure to soak this pod before planting it.

Advice is given with good intentions. You can take the advice or ignore the advice. Its all up to you.
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