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Old 09-14-2017, 12:42 PM   #51
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I've tried saffron in the past. Probably in rice dishes .
First time I got it, i opened it up and smelled it.
To me, it didn't smell all that great, but I wasn't sure if it was maybe something sitting on the shelf forever, not stored properly, cheap variety ...
So, years later, I tried it again. Similar experience, and haven't bought it since.
I'd like to taste a dish made by someone who knows what they're doing, so i can see what i'm missing out on.
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Old 09-14-2017, 02:37 PM   #52
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Saffron

I have a tiny bit of saffron threads from Penzeys that I got I don't how many years ago. I think I used a couple threads maybe twice, in some rice, didn't detect any difference in flavor.
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Old 09-16-2017, 11:54 AM   #53
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Mad Cook - Thank you ..

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Cornish saffron cake. Sporry, never made it so not sure what it's like
Shall do some research ..

Thank you for the idea and feedback ..

Have a nice weekend ..
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Old 09-16-2017, 12:00 PM   #54
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Larry: One must soak the threads in boiling water for 10 minutes

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Originally Posted by larry_stewart View Post
I've tried saffron in the past. Probably in rice dishes .
First time I got it, i opened it up and smelled it.
To me, it didn't smell all that great, but I wasn't sure if it was maybe something sitting on the shelf forever, not stored properly, cheap variety ...
So, years later, I tried it again. Similar experience, and haven't bought it since.
I'd like to taste a dish made by someone who knows what they're doing, so i can see what i'm missing out on.
Larry,

I am Barcelonés and have been preparing Paellas for a long time.

Take 5 to 12 strands depending on how many people you are serving a Paella or Rice to and soak the threads in boiling wáter for only 10 minutes in a glass bowl.

Then, pour the wáter with the saffron threads into your rice in your Pallera (pan to cook paella, metal with 2 handles ) when the rice is simmering ..

This is how we do it here ..

Have a lovely weekend ..
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Old 09-18-2017, 07:36 AM   #55
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While looking through our digital cookbook for another recipe, I came across another saffron recipe, yogurt and saffron marinated lamb chops that are grilled. It's not available online anymore and I copied and pasted, so can't post on here, but will send it IM if anybody wants it. We liked it, but had forgotten about it, been a long time since we made it.
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Old 09-18-2017, 08:27 AM   #56
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Hmm, a marinade? Sounds interesting.

I've had something similar once, but the saffron infused yoghurt was served as a sauce to go with the plainly roasted lamb.
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Old 09-18-2017, 12:43 PM   #57
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At the moment I'm researching old English recipes, notably 'The Forme of Cury A Roll of Ancient English Cookery' compiled about 1390 A.D. Saffron was an important ingredient in many dishes dating back to that era, and it was cultivated in England. It was an ingredient in both savoury and sweet dishes then. I need to investigate further. The evidence is in Medieval texts, which are quite difficult to read, but I know that it was used in the kitchens of the wealthy. More news anon. The Middle English texts are fairly difficult to read, but I read English at University, and have grasped some knowledge of it. Whether those recipes still exist remains to be seen, but I do know that it was a precious ingredient in much of the cookery.

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Old 09-21-2017, 01:21 PM   #58
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My understanding was that saffron was not uncommon across Europe in the middle ages. It would be locally grown, because they had loads of very cheap labour.
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Old 09-21-2017, 06:11 PM   #59
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Di Reston: Savory & Sweet

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At the moment I'm researching old English recipes, notably 'The Forme of Cury A Roll of Ancient English Cookery' compiled about 1390 A.D. Saffron was an important ingredient in many dishes dating back to that era, and it was cultivated in England. It was an ingredient in both savoury and sweet dishes then. I need to investigate further. The evidence is in Medieval texts, which are quite difficult to read, but I know that it was used in the kitchens of the wealthy. More news anon. The Middle English texts are fairly difficult to read, but I read English at University, and have grasped some knowledge of it. Whether those recipes still exist remains to be seen, but I do know that it was a precious ingredient in much of the cookery.

di reston

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Medieval texts are fascinating however, yes challenging to read.

Irani (Persians) and Turkish cuisines have used saffron since the VI century .. The Silk Route .. It is also quite common in desserts in Iran and Turkey ..

Spain is a fairly large producer (The Rurals of Toledo, is the Designation of Origin) so, I believe the Moors had brought it over to The Castilla La Mancha. Our Saffron Harvest is the last week of September every year.

As a matter of fact, we are flying to Madrid from Barcelona, and then shall rent a car and drive to the appellation ..

We, as a family (My Parents, My 2 daughter in laws and my in laws and I) prepare Paellas quite often for a Sunday lunch.

Thank you for the interesting post ..
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