"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Herbs and Spices
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-06-2015, 04:46 PM   #1
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Austin, TX.
Posts: 569
Sauerbraten for two

I would like make this dish for two.I like sour things, but all the recipies I see call for a large rump roast.

could I just marinate a sirloinn steak in vinegar and spices for a day and cook it on the grill, then serve with a gravey of the marinade and crushed ginger snaps?

I think the spices include Junniper Berries, which I may have to go look for, but maybe a bit of Gin might work!

Eric, Austin Tx.

__________________

__________________
giggler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2015, 04:58 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 24,094
Sauerbraten for two

I don't see why not. And gin might just work. I think gingersnaps are the key to good sauerbraten.

Do you have junipers in your yard?

Edit: Gah! Sauerbraten is traditionally made from horse! Though thankfully other meats are used.
__________________

__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2015, 05:16 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,845
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
I don't see why not. And gin might just work. I think gingersnaps are the key to good sauerbraten.

Do you have junipers in your yard?

Edit: Gah! Sauerbraten is traditionally made from horse! Though thankfully other meats are used.
That explains why it needs to marinate for three days!
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2015, 05:39 PM   #4
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,781
My go to meat is regular beef stew meat. The last batch I made, I bought a beef knuckle and cut it into cubes myself. I use a draw string bag to hold the spices, which include, Juniper berry, black pepper corns, whole cloves, bay leaves and yellow mustard seeds. The marinade includes chopped onion and carrots, water and cider vinegar. The marinade is brought to a boil and then cooled to room temperature. The cubed meat is put in a non reactive container and the marinade is added. Refrigerate at least 3 days and up to 7 days. The longer it marinates, the more sour it gets. When ready to cook, remove spice bag, bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer until beef is tender and add ginger snaps to thicken. It is best served over kartoffelklosse.
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2015, 12:21 AM   #5
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Tacoma
Posts: 200
Buy a rump roast and cut it down for more meals.

I've not made one in years and should do it again.

When I lived in Germany the gal next door was from
Bonn originally. She said their tradition was to use ginger
bread cake to make the sauce. I got a cake recipe from
a church cookbook and it was fantastic. I only used a
small portion of the cake so there was plenty for dessert
with fresh whipped cream for topping. After all these years
I cannot find that cake recipe.

I'll do another for an Oktoberfest dinner.
__________________
Lance Bushrod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2015, 01:52 AM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,032
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lance Bushrod View Post
Buy a rump roast and cut it down for more meals.

I've not made one in years and should do it again.

When I lived in Germany the gal next door was from
Bonn originally. She said their tradition was to use ginger
bread cake to make the sauce. I got a cake recipe from
a church cookbook and it was fantastic. I only used a
small portion of the cake so there was plenty for dessert
with fresh whipped cream for topping. After all these years
I cannot find that cake recipe.

I'll do another for an Oktoberfest dinner.
The following is a five star recipe for a gingerbread cake recipe.

Gingerbread Cake Recipe - Food.com

It is an old recipe, so it might just be what you are looking for. It was her grandmother's recipe from the 1930's.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2015, 03:22 PM   #7
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,408
When I was growing up, our family would spend a couple of Sundays every month at my grandmother's house having dinner. She was a first generation German immigrant, and Sauerbraten was one of her specialties. We didn't have it often because it took several days to prepare, so it was more of a special occasion dish.

I still make it once in a while, although I've varied the recipe slightly. My grandmother's recipe (which I assume was handed down to her) called for the addition of white wine to the marinade. Grandma was a teetotaler, though, and never added it, instead using apple juice in place of the wine. I've gone back to using wine in the recipe. In her day, I assume the wine used would've been something like Riesling. Instead I usually use a dry red wine.

Grandma didn't add gingersnaps or cake to her gravy. She just made a roux of flour and butter and added pan drippings, along with some of the marinade to make gravy. With the apple juice, it was sweet enough as is.

You could probably get away with using a smaller piece of meat, although it would probably affect the time in the marinade. My recipe suggests 3-5 days. I would definitely cut it down to 2-3 days, lest you end up with a very vinegary roast.

The other option would be to marinate a larger roast, then cut it up into smaller pieces and freeze. That would give you a few meals.

By the way, the old recipe I have calls for "stew meat." I don't know what that translates to in today's world, but I'm fairly certain my grandmother used bottom round.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2015, 04:26 PM   #8
Master Chef
 
Aunt Bea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: near Mount Pilot
Posts: 7,005
This is a recipe from an old German restaurant in Syracuse, it's gone now, called Gruen's.

This recipe is a little different it uses a pressure cooker, some citrus, catsup, and no gingersnaps.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/archi...-2e6998013cfa/
__________________

__________________
Aunt Bea is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.