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Old 08-17-2012, 10:12 AM   #11
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I've recently discoverd this and it definitely adds depth.
Achiote Paste Recipe - CHOW
I also use a homemade ancho/chipotle powder blend
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Old 08-17-2012, 10:50 AM   #12
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I like Rick Bayless's Roasted Tomato and Roasted Tomatillo Salsa recipes, where the vegetables are roasted under the broiler for 6-10 minutes, turning once, before making the salsa. Roasting concentrates the flavor and caramelizes the veggies, adding great flavor. If you want more heat, the easiest thing to do is keep more of the jalapeno's ribs and seeds.

Why do you use Italian seasonings in Tex/Mex food? I can see Mexican oregano, but basil or rosemary would not give a Tex/Mex flavor, imo.
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Old 08-17-2012, 11:01 AM   #13
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Maybe you should try the spices that homemade ketchup has? like chilli pepper, cinnamon, cloves, all spice, nutmeg, some vinegar?
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Old 08-18-2012, 01:16 AM   #14
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I could be totally off base but my theory is that you need to balance basic flavors to get depth. The tongue only tastes five basic ones, so take advantage of that by incorporating sweet, salty, sour, and umami (I skip on the bitter flavors...) into your dishes and you'll get the depth of flavor you want to go along with the heat. You could also go as far as to take a more Asian approach and include spicy as a sixth basic flavor component that needs to balance with the others.
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Old 09-01-2012, 08:25 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no mayonnaise View Post
I could be totally off base but my theory is that you need to balance basic flavors to get depth. The tongue only tastes five basic ones, so take advantage of that by incorporating sweet, salty, sour, and umami (I skip on the bitter flavors...) into your dishes and you'll get the depth of flavor you want to go along with the heat. You could also go as far as to take a more Asian approach and include spicy as a sixth basic flavor component that needs to balance with the others.
This is an interesting approach. And I never heard about this sixth basic flavor component.
Now I need to find out a chart which orders all spices and herbs according to the five basic tastes
I think I'll ask for it on the FB page of a big Italian producer, let's see what happens.

Thanks no mayonnaise
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Old 08-12-2013, 04:56 PM   #16
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My newest favorite spice for tex mex is smoked paprika. It has a slight kick & the smokey flavor adds the complexity you are looking for. It is bright red so it also adds color.
If you are making something green instead of red try green chilli powder made from New Mexico green chilis.
I have also started adding pickled hot chili peppers is small doses. Vinegar adds complexity & it is easier for me to find & keep pickled peppers.
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Old 08-12-2013, 05:05 PM   #17
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I make a blend from dried peppers typically found in Mexico/central America. I keep dried Chipotle, Ancho, Pasilla, Guajillo, Chili, Habanero in my pantry and will add various amounts, depending on what I am making, to my grinder and blend them up every so often. They keep forever....
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Old 08-12-2013, 05:12 PM   #18
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When I make salsa, I use different peppers, with different heat and flavor profiles. I like to use Anahiem, Hungarian Wax, Jalapeno, Sweet Red Bell, Green Bell, Habenero, and smoked Ghost Peppers (I like my salsa HOT). You could substitute Chipotle for the smoked ghost peppers. I then add diced onion, celery,and cilantro, and diced tomato. I cook it long enough to bring it to a boil, but only for 4 to 5 minutes. I then can it, using proper canning procedures. The longer it sits, the hotter it seems to get. I don't remove any seeds or membranes from the peppers.

The salsa has a great depth of flavor. You can tailor it by changing up the peppers, maybe adding some whole-kernal corn, chunks of mango, or berries.

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Old 08-12-2013, 06:25 PM   #19
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If you want to stray off Tex Mex, GOCHUJANG, the Korean hot pepper paste totally fills the bill about tons of flavor with manageable heat.
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Old 08-12-2013, 06:27 PM   #20
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In addition if you want to add umami, a squirt of good quality soy sauce does wonders.

And I'm not averse to a tiny pinch of Goya Sazon.
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