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Old 07-31-2008, 08:13 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VeraBlue View Post
I rarely use white pepper for that very reason. I'm of the opinion that it smells like feet just released from sweaty sneakers.
I always associated that smell with cumin.
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Old 07-31-2008, 08:42 AM   #12
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Hmmmph, I just stuck my nose in my white pepper and didn't smell much of anything except a faint smell like black pepper. Maybe it's old. 'Course I'm sneezing like a banshee, now.

Vera and ke, my Aunt Alice says that brussels sprouts "taste like dirty feet smell". Guess I love dirty feet - I like all 3 things.

Lee
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Old 07-31-2008, 08:55 AM   #13
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The white pepper shouldn't stink, it is should smell less pungent than the black variety. It is just black pepper with the skin removed. I would take it back for a replacement or just stick with the black pepper.

Try some Balinese long pepper if you want to smell something stinky! It isn't quite so bad once it has been ground and put on the food, though.
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Old 07-31-2008, 09:08 AM   #14
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I'd have to say I agree that the pepper shouldn't smell any worse that the black variety. Perhaps it was another ingredient that is the bad guy.
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Old 07-31-2008, 09:13 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VeraBlue View Post
I rarely use white pepper for that very reason. I'm of the opinion that it smells like feet just released from sweaty sneakers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by QSis View Post
Hmmmph, I just stuck my nose in my white pepper and didn't smell much of anything except a faint smell like black pepper. Maybe it's old. 'Course I'm sneezing like a banshee, now.

Vera and ke, my Aunt Alice says that brussels sprouts "taste like dirty feet smell". Guess I love dirty feet - I like all 3 things.

Lee
I'm laughing my head off at you two. So funny!

I use white pepper because it is milder and when I don't want black speckles on my food - like fish.
But I don't cook or eat brussel sprouts not because they smell like feet, but they just plain STINK! Which is why I don't cook or eat califlower, cooked cabbage, or rutabega, either. Just can't get past the smell.

Send that pepper back. Maybe it wasn't dried enough, and it picked up a bacterial or a smell from something it was near, when drying. Don't chance it.
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Old 07-31-2008, 10:16 AM   #16
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Ditto for me. No potent bad experience for me with White Pepper. I use a grinder for both on a regular basis.
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Old 07-31-2008, 12:14 PM   #17
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Wow lot's of opinions here! I'm wondering if it is like cyanide... not poisonous (I hope), but that only certain people can smell it?

The overwhelming number of commenters that say they don't notice any stink vs the ones that say it DOES stink makes me think that some people got it and some people don't. I'm with Vera on the feet smell. I actually told SO that it smelled like... um.. kaka, I believe... Not sure how one goes about spelling that, but I think we all understand here.

I had coarse white pepper, so I tilted the cooking liquid to the bottom of the pan and used paper towels to sop up as many grounds as I could. The faint aroma is still obvious to me, but at least I cut back on anyone gettting it caught in their teeth! Talk about bad breath!

SO also said that in the past he always disliked white pepper because it tasted/smelled funny and he's corny for peppercorns. (That's like kooky for Coco Puffs)
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Old 07-31-2008, 12:16 PM   #18
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Quote:
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THis makes perfect sense with my cyanide idea!!

I wonder if they are closely chemically related? Any chemists here? This is so interesting. Thanks for the research.
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Old 07-31-2008, 12:30 PM   #19
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Ok it looks like Pyridine is C(5)H(5)N and Hydrogen Cyanide is HCN

are we on to something?

And YT2095 - I'm sorry I should have asked if YOU ARE a chemist! Are you?
[edit]Ok I checked your profile and now I know all about you.
You are definitely the authority.
I bow to your chemical wisdom (humbly).[/edit]
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Old 07-31-2008, 12:48 PM   #20
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Sorry to monopolize the thread, but here is a medical publication that refers to the "fecal off-odor frequently detected in white pepper powders." That's kaka, right?

Role of the fermentation process in off-odorant formation in white pepper

Can you tell I'm now obsessed?

All of the answers:
News For Curious Cooks: Strange flavors in white pepper
"The Australian scientists may also have discovered how these highly spiced potatoes were allowed to leave the kitchen: they tested 49 people and found that about 20 percent of them could not detect rotundone at all, even at concentrations far above what’s found in white pepper. The scientists say this shows the different experiences two people can have of the same wine, or of the same pepper-seasoned food."
Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company "What's the Pepper Note in Those Shirazes?"
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