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Old 06-20-2009, 02:04 PM   #11
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I am consistently impressed by the knowledge of our members. Thanks for all the info you guys!

I am ALSO terribly jealous of those of you that have trees that bear actual cherries. All I have is a hawthorne tree. While its beautiful, I certainly can't eat anything off it. Lucky bums!
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Old 06-20-2009, 02:24 PM   #12
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Ahh - but you're blessed with a nice Hawthorne tree. My dad loved them, but unfortunately Long Island, NY, (as well as here in Virginia), we also have an abundance of native cedar trees, which are the main host for "rust". Dad tried to keep his lovely Hawthorne alive, just as I do my lone apple tree - but it's a losing battle when you're surrounded by a forest of disease host plants. And while I probably could stay the tide by following orchardist chemical-spray procedures, being organically-minded at heart, I think I'll just continue to buy my apples in season at the local farmers market. :)
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Old 06-20-2009, 05:42 PM   #13
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My hawthorne is flourishing, but my neighbour keeps offering to lop the top half of my tree off every other year when he does his ornamental cherry. I think that is an ugly look myself and you don't get any blossoms that year so I always say no thanks. I sure wish our growing season was conducive to some of the fruit trees you guys can have, sigh. Oh well. I'll settle for fewer bugs instead!
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Old 06-24-2009, 03:35 PM   #14
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An approved organic fungicide to help control rust is the old fashioned Bordeax mix and hydrated lime.
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Old 06-24-2009, 03:45 PM   #15
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Hey All,

turns out it really is a cherry tree. We picked some a little too early and they were sweet but still a bit too tart for us. I made some jam out of them. We'll be putting a net out soon, gotta get them before the birds do. Thanks for all the help!

Eva Marie
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Old 06-25-2009, 08:48 AM   #16
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Eva Marie - please be sure to check your netted tree frequently (at least twice a day) for trapped or entangled birds.

I stopped using netting on my cherry tree after one season because, even though it was "bird netting", I kept finding birds entangled in it. One, an absolutely gorgeous male Scarlet Tanager, was dead when I found him. I decided after that that it just wasn't worth it, & now just factor in a certain amount of fruit for us & a certain amount for the birds.
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Old 06-25-2009, 12:57 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
Eva Marie - please be sure to check your netted tree frequently (at least twice a day) for trapped or entangled birds.

I stopped using netting on my cherry tree after one season because, even though it was "bird netting", I kept finding birds entangled in it. One, an absolutely gorgeous male Scarlet Tanager, was dead when I found him. I decided after that that it just wasn't worth it, & now just factor in a certain amount of fruit for us & a certain amount for the birds.
What if you put a big mosquito net over it. I can't think of any birds that are small enough to get tangled up in that. And it would protect you from bugs when your picking as a bonus.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 06-25-2009, 11:35 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
Eva Marie - please be sure to check your netted tree frequently (at least twice a day) for trapped or entangled birds.

I stopped using netting on my cherry tree after one season because, even though it was "bird netting", I kept finding birds entangled in it. One, an absolutely gorgeous male Scarlet Tanager, was dead when I found him. I decided after that that it just wasn't worth it, & now just factor in a certain amount of fruit for us & a certain amount for the birds.
Thank goodness you mentioned this. No one else said anything, not even the woman who told me about netting the tree. Yikes. We have lots and lots of birds around that tree so it's certainly a risk. I'll make sure to check it often. I made my first cherry pie of the season with a friend of a friends cherries, delish! I cannot wait to make some of my own from our tree!
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