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Old 07-07-2013, 10:06 AM   #1
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Clueless herb grower

Hey guys I just had the idea to grow some herbs this summer before it ends. My only problem is I know nothing about it. For instance; what I have to buy, what kind of pot or soil needed, how much sun they need/water. I have no knowledge so any tips will help.

Also if you have any suggestions on herbs to grow. I was going to do basil, tyme, and rosemary.

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Old 07-07-2013, 11:05 AM   #2
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Hi. I've been growing herbs for over 20 years - they're among the easiest plants to grow. They don't need any special soil or pots - any good potting soil will do and they can be grown in pretty much any kind of container. Rosemary and thyme don't need a lot of fertilizer or water; I plant basil with my tomatoes, since they need about the same amount of water.

Rosemary will grow into a large shrub - say, 3 feet by 3 feet - if you let it, but it can be trimmed to keep it smaller. Thyme grows to about 6-8 inches tall and will spread out, but again, can be clipped back to suit your container. Basil can get a couple of feet tall, and will be more bushy if you cut several inches of stems when you harvest it. With all of these, you can harvest as much as you need at one time.

In the fall when they start to fade, I cut back thyme and rosemary and put the stems in dry vases. Then I let them sit in the kitchen till they're dry, strip the leaves off the stems, and refill my dried herb jars. This works for woody herbs, like rosemary, thyme, sage and oregano. For soft herbs like parsley, basil and cilantro, I whiz them in the food processor with an equal amount of water, then portion the mixture into ice cube trays and freeze. Then you can throw a cube into winter soups, stews and sauces.

I would suggest starting with herbs you like to cook with I started with parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme because I like the song I also grow Genovese basil, cilantro, Thai basil, mint and a bay tree. Mint can be invasive, so I would plant it separately; I have mine in a strawberry pot. Hope this helps.
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Old 07-07-2013, 12:48 PM   #3
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I grow all my herbs in a AeroGarden sitting on a table bookshelf in my kitchen. Its expensive but its almost foolproof and the herbs it produces is fantastic. I've even done cherry tomatoes and jalapenos. I've even used it as a seed starter before transplanting to pots.
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Old 07-07-2013, 02:35 PM   #4
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So lets say I do Basil, tyhme, rosemary. Should I do any of them in separate pots? Do some need more sun than others or more or less water than others?
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Old 07-07-2013, 02:52 PM   #5
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All herbs do best with at least 6 hours of full sun per day. My experience has been that basil requires more water than the others.
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Old 07-07-2013, 02:57 PM   #6
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I would put the rosemary in its own pot, so you can bring it indoors for winter. Hmm, maybe you can bring in the thyme too.

Basil won't usually live through the winter.
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Old 07-07-2013, 03:11 PM   #7
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I don't baby my herbs. I grow my thyme and oregano in a little garden, and throw basil seeds (an annual) in the ground in another plot. I dig my rosemary up and bring it in to overwinter as it's not hardy here. Everything can be grown in pots, but to save on watering, I like to put them in the ground. You might want to put them in big pots, and they would all survive just fine if you stuck them all in one big pot like a whiskey barrel rather than a bunch of dinky ones. I don't fertilize my herbs. My oregano, thyme and sage actually don't get that much sun. I have my mints in pots buried in the shade garden, as GG said, they are invasive. As is oregano. Don't overwater, anything with woody stems will be fine. Succulent stems like basil and parsley might need more water. I've actually overwintered both, they looked pretty ratty, but tasted great!
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Old 07-07-2013, 11:43 PM   #8
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Double underscore growing Mint in pots. I too bury the pots in the ground, just so it visually fits in with the other garden herbs. It spreads and can really take over. Also, if you grow oregano, make sure you prune the flowers so they don't go to seed everywhere.
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Old 07-08-2013, 08:01 AM   #9
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On the other hand, if you grow parsley, let it go to seed. It's a biannual - it has a lot of leaves the first year; it has less the second year, but then it goes to seed and you have new plants with a lot of leaves the third year, and so on.
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Old 07-08-2013, 10:00 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
On the other hand, if you grow parsley, let it go to seed. It's a biannual - it has a lot of leaves the first year; it has less the second year, but then it goes to seed and you have new plants with a lot of leaves the third year, and so on.
That's what I found out by accident. There aren't any flowers / seeds the first year. The second year surprised me. The third year surprised me even more, because I got so much parsley. I'm on the fourth year now and they are flowering.

With parsley, you might even consider planting some or putting in some seed the second year, so you have "both years" going at once.
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