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Old 03-02-2016, 08:47 AM   #21
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Thank you, Aunt Bea. I did try to find it online, but I will have to call City Hall to find out for sure. There is a fellow outside of Lingle who has a farm stand when the produce starts coming in. I'm going to be making friends with him for sure.
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Old 03-02-2016, 01:18 PM   #22
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Thank you, Aunt Bea. I did try to find it online, but I will have to call City Hall to find out for sure. There is a fellow outside of Lingle who has a farm stand when the produce starts coming in. I'm going to be making friends with him for sure.
PriFi; There is a manure that can be directly worked into your garden, with no need to let it rot, and it doesn't carry weed seed that can really make you crazy. It is rabbit droppings. If you know of any rabbit farms, or know anyone who raises them, they are usually more than happy to give them away. They are fairly oder-free, and are considered a cold manure, that is the nitrogen realeases slowly so as not to burn the plants, or their roots (just like worm casings, but not quite as good). Chicken manure is very hot, and must rot for a good, long time. Horse and cow manure aren't as hot, but still have to rot. They also carry lots of weed seeds. Just some more info for you.

Here is a site that lists the benefits of rabbit manures - THE BENEFITS AND USES OF RABBIT MANURE | Rise and Shine Rabbitry

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Old 03-02-2016, 04:16 PM   #23
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Also, I know Nurse PF knows this, but for others reading, e. Coli occurs naturally in all animal waste, so any manure must be aged for a period of time to eliminate it as much as possible.
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Old 03-02-2016, 04:34 PM   #24
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Also, I know Nurse PF knows this, but for others reading, e. Coli occurs naturally in all animal waste, so any manure must be aged for a period of time to eliminate it as much as possible.
That's why I was not looking at manure. Besides, most of the farms around here run cattle during the winter, they are not collecting the manure. There is a feed lot east of town, maybe they have a pile or two.
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Old 03-02-2016, 05:51 PM   #25
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The city composting program sounds like the fastest way.

Easy too.

To speed thing up if you can't find a source you'll want to make sure you build a bin that get plenty of air.

A wooden frame and hardware cloth works well.

You'll need to keep it moist and turn it over every now and again.

Giving it air speeds it up.

A mixture of brown and green is helpful. Check with Mr. Google for the ratio as I don't recall it myself.

They make contraptions that are a barrel that you spin to stir. They will save you having to turn it over by hand but are rather small scale.

If you have the room make more then one bin or get more then one barrel. I'd suggest at least 3.

That way you have one done, one cooking, and one your filling the pot with fresh ingredients.

Also if you make your own bins and they sit on the ground place some kind of barrier on the bottom.

Plants love nourishment and will attack your compost pile from underneath if they can.

Best of luck and enjoy the work ahead PF.
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Old 03-02-2016, 05:55 PM   #26
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Also, I know Nurse PF knows this, but for others reading, e. Coli occurs naturally in all animal waste, so any manure must be aged for a period of time to eliminate it as much as possible.
Rabbit droppings can be put in with the compost which supplies a great amount of nitrogen and other nutrients and minerals. The hot compost will kill pathogens. That's also why worm boxes are great as well. Worm casings are safer than is manure.

And just so's you knows, most soil contains a number of pathogens, which are outlined here - http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/770540. As you can see, Anthrax, Clostridium botuli (I think that's the critter), E-Coli, and a host of other pathogens occur in most soils, all over the world. tis a dangerous world we live in, and care must be taken to limit the risk of infection. Composting is a good way to do that as the heat from a proper compost pile not only kills weed seeds, but can help sterilize any matter in the pile, making it safe for using in your veggie garden. Just more info for you.

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Old 03-02-2016, 06:26 PM   #27
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That's why I was not looking at manure. Besides, most of the farms around here run cattle during the winter, they are not collecting the manure. There is a feed lot east of town, maybe they have a pile or two.
Farmers in general don't go around picking up pieces of manure. What they do is sweep/shovel/move with a tractor, large amounts of manure with straw/hay/shavings, and pile it outside the barn. Then a month or so later they do it again. They end up with piles of the mixture and the rain comes down on it, and it composts on its own.
We go to the farmer (on craigslist) and fill up a trailer with the composted manure/straw/hay/shavings that are aged, and put it in our gardens. We have fabulous gardens. Try to get the oldest pile of $%$%^. :)
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Old 03-02-2016, 06:31 PM   #28
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Farmers in general don't go around picking up pieces of manure. What they do is sweep/shovel/move with a tractor, large amounts of manure with straw/hay/shavings, and pile it outside the barn. Then a month or so later they do it again. They end up with piles of the mixture and the rain comes down on it, and it composts on its own.
We go to the farmer (on craigslist) and fill up a trailer with the composted manure/straw/hay/shavings that are aged, and put it in our gardens. We have fabulous gardens. Try to get the oldest pile of $%$%^. :)

Heh. When visiting a farm when I was little, I remember asking my dad what the big piles of manure and straw were for. He told me they were horse toilet paper.
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Old 03-03-2016, 08:29 AM   #29
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The fields around here have been tilled, manure and straw going back into the soil. The fields are then allowed to lie fallow for the year or an alternate crop is grown. Lots of alfalfa growing around these parts, corn and sunflowers, too.
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